Research

Displaying 171 - 180 of 255

‘Prototype pathway’ yields organ transplant technology

‘Prototype pathway’ yields organ transplant technology
Organ transplantation has come a long way from its early days in the mid-twentieth century. But even with major medical advances, there’s still an admittedly familiar factor at play: ice. Just prior to transplantation, an organ is reconstructed and prepared in the sterile operating room during what is known as the “backbench procedure.” As surgeons prepare the organ, it stays cooled and preserved in a hypothermic state in a basin on a bed of sterile ice.
14th November 2016

Cracking the code for dormant bacteria

Cracking the code for dormant bacteria
  The genetic code that allows cells to store the information necessary for life is well-known. Four nucleotides, abbreviated A, C, G, and T, spell out DNA sequences that code for all of the proteins cells need. MIT researchers have now discovered another layer of control that helps cells to rapidly divert resources in emergency situations.
11th November 2016

Researchers target tenfold increase in X-ray resolution

Researchers target tenfold increase in X-ray resolution
For all of its benefit to society, the technology we use for medical imaging is nevertheless flawed. Relevant little details go undetected due to limitations in resolution. But a recent investment in research at KTH aims to improve the picture – by at least 10 times. There are today several ways to explore how our bodies look inside. Computerised tomography (CT) and X-ray are two of the most widely-known techniques.
31st October 2016


Nanoparticle drugs reach their targets with ease

Nanoparticle drugs reach their targets with ease
The huge doses of drugs required to combat cancer could be reduced thanks to the work of A*STAR researchers, and the drugs themselves may become more effective. The researchers have developed a polymeric 'scaffold' that helps drugs that often have trouble entering the bloodstream, such as anti-cancer agents, form highly stable nanoparticles with improved bioavailability.
21st October 2016

Researchers uncover the skin barrier

Researchers uncover the skin barrier
Researchers at the Faculty of Science at Lund University in Sweden can now explain how the properties of the skin change depending on the environment. The new findings explain, among other things, why people don’t dehydrate in dry air. The research results can also be used in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry to make substances penetrate the skin more effectively.
28th September 2016

Improved microendoscope brings cervical cancer into focus

Improved microendoscope brings cervical cancer into focus
Rice University researchers have added a clever spin—a rotating grating that removes out-of-focus light—to a cutting-edge, minimally invasive fibre-optic microscope that lets oncologists and surgeons zoom in on cancer tumors prior to surgery. The research is published online in the Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
15th September 2016

Fighting cancer with space research

Fighting cancer with space research
Every day, NASA spacecraft beam down hundreds of petabytes of data, all of which has to be codified, stored and distributed to scientists across the globe. Increasingly, artificial intelligence is helping to "read" this data as well, highlighting similarities between datasets that scientists might miss. For the past 15 years, the big data techniques pioneered by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, have been revolutionising biomedical research.
15th September 2016

Cells offer insights into properties of the heart

Cells offer insights into properties of the heart
Cell models from stem cells serve an ever-increasing role in research of cardiac dysfunction. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have succeeded in producing cells which offer new insights into properties of the heart. They installed a molecular sensor into the cells which emits light, and not only makes the cells' electrical activity visible, but also makes it possible for the first time to quickly identify cell types.
2nd September 2016

Virtual scalpel aids anatomy lessons

Virtual scalpel aids anatomy lessons
First-year medical students at the University of British Columbia will begin using a state-of-the-art touch-screen table that displays detailed images of internal anatomy that can be rotated, enlarged and even sliced open. The anatomy visualisation table will be used with traditional anatomical dissections to teach first-year medical students about human anatomy and the medical conditions they are likely to encounter as physicians.
26th August 2016

Triggering blood clotting at the molecular scale

Triggering blood clotting at the molecular scale
Using a unique single-molecule force measurement tool, a research team has developed a clearer understanding of how platelets sense the mechanical forces they encounter during bleeding to initiate the cascading process that leads to blood clotting. Beyond providing a better understanding of this vital bodily process, research into a mechanoreceptor molecule that triggers clotting could provide a potential new target for therapeutic intervention.
16th August 2016


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