Treatment

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Healing stroke damage with stem cells

Healing stroke damage with stem cells
Stroke is the leading cause of permanent disability in the U.S., striking nearly 800,000 people each year. Hemorrhagic, or bleeding, stroke is particularly devastating, says Mayo Clinic neurologist and critical care expert Dr. William D. Freeman. "About 40% of hemorrhagic stroke patients die within a month, and half of the survivors have some type of impairment," he adds.
6th July 2017

Early-stage breast cancer patients can receive expedited treatment

Early-stage breast cancer patients can receive expedited treatment
Early-stage breast cancer patients now have a fast-track treatment option at Mayo Clinic. Select, low-risk patients are completing their surgery and radiation in less than 10 days. "It’s a great option for women who are really, really busy and would like to complete all their therapy within a [short] time frame and get on with the rest of their life," says Dr. Tina Hieken, a Mayo Clinic surgeon who helped develop the program.
6th July 2017

Engineering digestive system tissues in the lab

Engineering digestive system tissues in the lab
  Researchers at Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine have reached important milestones in their quest to engineer replacement tissue in the lab to treat digestive system conditions - from infants born with too-short bowels to adults with inflammatory bowel disease, colon cancer, or fecal incontinence.
5th July 2017


Artificial bile ducts developed in lab

Artificial bile ducts developed in lab
Cambridge scientists have developed a new method for growing and transplanting artificial bile ducts that could in future be used to help treat liver disease in children, reducing the need for liver transplantation. In research published in the journal Nature Medicine, the researchers grew 3D cellular structure which, once transplanted into mice, developed into normal, functioning bile ducts.
4th July 2017

Old bones lead to strategy for drug delivery

Old bones lead to strategy for drug delivery
  Taking a hint from archaeology, where centuries-old bones and teeth have been found to harbor intact biological proteins, a team of Wisconsin scientists has devised a way to deliver drugs and other therapeutic agents by coating medical devices with a nanostructured mineral sheath that mimics bone.
4th July 2017

Molecular cages improve energy conversion and drug delivery

Molecular cages improve energy conversion and drug delivery
Scientists from Trinity College Dublin and AMBER, the Science Foundation Ireland-funded materials science research centre hosted in Trinity College Dublin, have created 'molecular cages' that can maximise the efficiency of converting molecules in chemical reactions, and that may in future also be used as sensors and drug-delivery agents. The cages can be packed with different molecules, many of which have a specific task or functionality.
30th June 2017

System makes customised antibiotic treatments possible

System makes customised antibiotic treatments possible
A diagnostic system developed at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology enables rapid and accurate customisation of the antibiotic to the patient. The system makes for faster diagnostics, earlier and more effective treatment of infectious bacteria, and improved patient recovery times. The findings were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
30th June 2017

Cerene Cryotherapy Device receives CE Mark Approval

Cerene Cryotherapy Device receives CE Mark Approval
Channel Medsystems has announced that it has earned CE Mark approval, allowing the Company to initiate marketing efforts and commercialisation of its Cerene Cryotherapy Device (Cerene device) in Europe. The Cerene device is intended for endometrial cryoablation in premenopausal women with heavy menstrual bleeding due to benign causes in whom childbearing is complete.
30th June 2017

Injectable nanoparticles delay tumour progression

Injectable nanoparticles delay tumour progression
Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in collaboration with researchers from Dartmouth Geisel School of Medicine and RWTH Aachen University (Germany) have adapted virus particles—that normally infect potatoes—to serve as cancer drug delivery devices for mice. But in an article published in Nano Letters, the team showed injecting the virus particles alongside chemotherapy drugs, instead of packing the drugs inside, may provide an even more potent benefit.
28th June 2017

Gene communication stimulates regenerative healing

Gene communication stimulates regenerative healing
In a study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the University of Florida researchers found genes known to form hearts cells in humans and other animals in the gut of a muscle-less and heartless sea anemone. But the sea anemone isn't just any sea creature. It has superpower-like abilities: cut it into many pieces and each piece will regenerate into a new animal.
27th June 2017


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