Sensors

Displaying 11 - 20 of 87

Plasmonic biosensors enable easy-to-use health tests

Plasmonic biosensors enable easy-to-use health tests
  A biosensor developed at Aalto University enables creating a range of new health tests similar to home pregnancy tests. The plasmonic biosensor can detect diseased exosomes even by the naked eye. Exosomes, important indicators of health conditions, are cell-derived vesicles that are present in blood and urine.
19th December 2017

Accidental exhale leads to improved DNA detector

Accidental exhale leads to improved DNA detector
Greg Madejski held his breath as he looked into the microscope, trying to weld two fingernail-sized chips together: a tiny chip containing a nanofiltre on top of another chip with a DNA sensor. It was frustrating work. The chips weren’t making good contact with each other. Madejski gently poked at the chips, then peered over the top of the microscope. And exhaled. The sudden waft of warm air swept over the nanofiltre, transferring it to the sensor—right on target.
18th December 2017

MEG sensor hoped to improve epilepsy diagnosis

MEG sensor hoped to improve epilepsy diagnosis
  A research institute of CEA Tech, Leti, has announced it has taken a major step toward development of next-gen magnetoencephalography (MEG) that could significantly reduce the cost of MEG systems and scans, improve diagnosis and treatment for epilepsy patients and help guide surgeons performing brain surgery.
12th December 2017


Sensor measures calcium concentrations deep inside tissue

Sensor measures calcium concentrations deep inside tissue
Key processes in the body are controlled by the concentration of calcium in and around cells. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed the first sensor molecule that is able to visualise calcium in living animals with the help of a radiation-free imaging technique known as optoacoustics. The method does not require the cells to be genetically modified and involves no radiation exposure.
5th December 2017

Mini connector delivers high speed transmission on consumer devices

Mini connector delivers high speed transmission on consumer devices
  A miniature lightweight Flexible Printed Circuit (FPC) connector for portable electronic devices that require high speed transmission has been developed by Hirose. The FH53M series FPC connector saves valuable PCB real estate via a back flip style actuator that minimises the required mounting area.
29th November 2017

Keep your finger on the pulse!

Keep your finger on the pulse!
Willow Technologies has unveiled the new heart rate optical sensor from Rohm - the BH1790GLC. Utilising a specialised optical filter which enables high accuracy detection, extending battery life while reducing the effects of IRraysten-fold versus conventional products. Making it possible to achieve high quality pulse signals even in environments with strong IR presence, such as the outdoors or under intense movement.
3rd November 2017

Sensor measures lipolysis by testing a person’s exhalations

Sensor measures lipolysis by testing a person’s exhalations
Experts advise anyone looking to shed extra kilos to eat less and exercise more. One way is with endurance training, during which the body burns not only carbohydrates such as sugar, but also fat. When exactly the body begins burning fat can now be determined by analysing, for example, biomarkers in the blood or urine. Scientists at ETH Zurich and the University Hospital Zurich have now developed a method for the highly convenient, real-time monitoring of lipolysis by testing a person’s exhalations during exercise.
16th October 2017

Stretchable fibre optic measures changes in body movements

Stretchable fibre optic measures changes in body movements
Engineers at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China have now developed a way to use a special optical fibre to detect minute changes in the movement of various body parts. The advancement will hopefully help patients undergoing musculoskeletal rehabilitation, athletes improve their training techniques, and everyone to play video games in an exciting new way. Though the approach is not entirely new, as fibre optics are already widely used to measure physical strains that buildings and bridges are subjected to.
16th October 2017

Future smartwatches could sense hand movement

Future smartwatches could sense hand movement
New research has shown future wearable devices, such as smartwatches, could use ultrasound imaging to sense hand gestures. The research team led by Professor Mike Fraser, Asier Marzo and Jess McIntosh from the Bristol Interaction Group (BIG) at the University of Bristol, together with University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust (UH Bristol), presented their paper this summer at one of the world’s most important conferences on human-computer interfaces, ACM CHI 2017 held in Denver, USA.
13th October 2017

Sensors can detect movement in GI tract

Sensors can detect movement in GI tract
Researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women’s Hospital have built a flexible sensor that can be rolled up and swallowed. Upon ingestion, the sensor adheres to the stomach wall or intestinal lining, where it can measure the rhythmic contractions of the digestive tract. Such sensors could help doctors to diagnose gastrointestinal disorders that slow down the passage of food through the digestive tract.
13th October 2017


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