Research

Displaying 11 - 20 of 255

Computer model sheds light on sudden cardiac death

Computer model sheds light on sudden cardiac death
Some heart disease patients face a higher risk of sudden cardiac death, which can happen when an arrhythmia—an irregular heartbeat—disrupts the normal electrical activity in the heart and causes the organ to stop pumping. However, arrhythmias linked to sudden cardiac death are very rare, making it difficult to study how they occur—and how they might be prevented.
11th December 2017

BioMimics: highly realistic 3D-printed models of human anatomy

BioMimics: highly realistic 3D-printed models of human anatomy
Stratasys has unveiled BioMimics – a highly advanced capability to 3D print medical models that are engineered to meet demands of the industry’s leading hospitals, researchers and medical device manufacturers. Offered initially in North America as a service through Stratasys Direct Manufacturing, BioMimics provides incredibly realistic, functionally-accurate 3D printed replicas of complex anatomical structures - empowering more effective medical training, education and advanced device testing.
11th December 2017

Study examines the interaction of human cancer inhibitors

Study examines the interaction of human cancer inhibitors
Medications which block enzymes belonging to the kinase family, are among the most effective pharmaceuticals for targeted cancer therapies. Scientists at the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have examined 243 kinase inhibitors which are either approved drugs or have been tested in clinical trials. According to results published in Science, some of these may have more applications than previously thought.
5th December 2017


Turtles help advance understanding of lung abnormality

Turtles help advance understanding of lung abnormality
A study of an unusual snapping turtle with one lung found shared characteristics with humans born with one lung who survive beyond infancy. Digital 3D anatomical models created by Emma Schachner, PhD, Assistant Professor of Cell Biology & Anatomy at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, made the detailed research possible. The work is published in The Journal of Anatomy, the cover of which features an image of the study's 3D models.
27th November 2017

Flexibility is at the heart of human intelligence

Flexibility is at the heart of human intelligence
  Centuries of study have yielded many theories about how the brain gives rise to human intelligence. Some neuroscientists think intelligence springs from a single region or neural network. Others argue that metabolism or the efficiency with which brain cells make use of essential resources are key.
21st November 2017

Genome editing improves T-cells to attack cancer

Genome editing improves T-cells to attack cancer
Researchers at Cardiff University have found a way to boost the cancer-destroying ability of the immune system’s T-cells, offering new hope in the fight against a wide range of cancers. Using CRISPR genome editing, the team took the genetic engineering of killer T-cells one step further by removing their non-cancer specific receptors and replacing them with ones that would recognise specific cancer cells and destroy them.
21st November 2017

Hibernating squirrels inspire alternative stroke treatments

Hibernating squirrels inspire alternative stroke treatments
In the fight against brain damage caused by stroke, researchers have turned to an unlikely source of inspiration: hibernating ground squirrels. While the animals' brains experience dramatically reduced blood flow during hibernation, just like human patients after a certain type of stroke, the squirrels emerge from their extended naps suffering no ill effects.
20th November 2017

Paving the way to safer drugs through dissociation of side effects

Paving the way to safer drugs through dissociation of side effects
Opioid pain relievers can be extremely effective in relieving pain, but can carry a high risk of addiction and ultimately overdose when breathing is suppressed and stops. Scientists have discovered a way to separate these two effects - pain relief and breathing - opening a window of opportunity to make effective pain medications without the risk of respiratory failure. The research, published in Cell, was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health.
20th November 2017

Soft biological tissue deforms differently under tension

Soft biological tissue deforms differently under tension
  Engineers at ETH Zurich have discovered that soft biological tissue deforms very differently under tension than previously assumed. Their findings are already being put to use in medical research projects.
20th November 2017

Gut microbes can protect against high blood pressure

Gut microbes can protect against high blood pressure
Microbes living in your gut may help protect against the effects of a high-salt diet, according to a new study from MIT. The MIT team, working with researchers in Germany, found that in both mice and humans, a high-salt diet shrinks the population of a certain type of beneficial bacteria. As a result, pro-inflammatory immune cells called Th-17 cells grow in number. These immune cells have been linked with high blood pressure, although the exact mechanism of how they contribute to hypertension is not yet known.
16th November 2017


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