Research

Displaying 181 - 190 of 250

Growing living bone for facial reconstruction

Growing living bone for facial reconstruction
Researchers have engineered living bone tissue to repair bone loss in the jaw, a structure that is typically difficult to restore. The team led by researchers from Columbia University, New York, grafted customised implants into pig jaws that resulted in integration and function of the engineered graft into the recipient's own tissue. The work, reported in Science Translational Medicine, suggests that personalised bone grafts for facial reconstruction may be possible in the future.
5th August 2016

Magnetic field helps avoid implants rejection

A group of Russian physicists, with the contribution from their Swiss colleagues, developed a way to use the therapeutic effect of heating or cooling the tissues due to the magnetocaloric effect. The article with the results of the work was published in the latest issue of the International Journal of Refrigeration. A team of the Lomonosov Moscow State University scientists proposed a way to use the magnetocaloric effect for the targeted delivery of drugs to the implants.
5th August 2016

Microfluidic chip replicates muscle-nerve connection

Microfluidic chip replicates muscle-nerve connection
MIT engineers have developed a microfluidic device that replicates the neuromuscular junction - the vital connection where nerve meets muscle. The device, about the size of a U.S. quarter, contains a single muscle strip and a small set of motor neurons. Researchers can influence and observe the interactions between the two, within a realistic, three-dimensional matrix. The researchers genetically modified the neurons in the device to respond to light.
5th August 2016


Lab-on-a-chip technology helps cancer detection

Lab-on-a-chip technology helps cancer detection
IBM scientists have developed a lab-on-a-chip technology that can, for the first time, separate biological particles at the nanoscale and could enable physicians to detect diseases such as cancer before symptoms appear. As reported today in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, the IBM team's results show size-based separation of bioparticles down to 20 nm in diameter, a scale that gives access to important particles such as DNA, viruses and exosomes.
2nd August 2016

Singapore scientists grow mini human brains

Singapore scientists grow mini human brains
Scientists in Singapore have made a big leap on research on the 'mini-brain'. These advanced mini versions of the human midbrain will help researchers develop treatments and conduct other studies into Parkinson's Disease[1] (PD) and ageing-related brain diseases. These mini midbrain versions are 3D miniature tissues that are grown in the laboratory and they have certain properties of specific parts of the human brain. 
1st August 2016

Inflammatory response to ceramic scaffolds promotes bone regeneration

Inflammatory response to ceramic scaffolds promotes bone regeneration
In their mission to design biomaterials that promote tissue regeneration, Drexel University researchers have identified how inflammation, when precisely controlled, is crucial to bone repair. Their findings, published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, show that a new type of ceramic scaffold causes inflammatory cells to behave in a way that is more regenerative than scaffolds that are currently used clinically.
29th July 2016

Virtual brain aids the investigation of epilepsy

Virtual brain aids the investigation of epilepsy
Researchers at CNRS, INSERM, Aix-Marseille University and AP-HM have just created a virtual brain that can reconstitute the brain of a person affected by epilepsy for the first time. From this work we understand better how the disease works and can also better prepare for surgery. These results are published in Neuroimage. Worldwide, one percent of the population suffers from epilepsy.
29th July 2016

'Repair system' in algae yields tools for biotechnology

'Repair system' in algae yields tools for biotechnology
A way of fixing inactive proteins has been discovered in an algae, which uses chloroplast extracts and light to release an interrupting sequence from a protein. Research specialist Stephen Campbell and Professor David Stern at the Boyce Thompson Institute report the discovery in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. This repair system may have applications in agriculture and biotechnology because it could potentially be harnessed to enable proteins to become active only in the light.
29th July 2016

Enabling the visualisation of oxygen in tissue

Enabling the visualisation of oxygen in tissue
Learning how to look inside a body without having to cut it open is still an important part of medical research. One of the great challenges in imaging remains the visualisation of oxygen in tissue. A team led by Prof. Vasilis Ntziachristos, Chair for Biological Imaging at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Director of the Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging at the Helmholtz Centre in Munich, has developed an approach to this task.
29th July 2016

Helping the visually impaired to navigate safely

Helping the visually impaired to navigate safely
A recently launched project aimed at developing and testing a portable, electronic assistance system that will greatly extend the range of motion for the visually impaired, will receive €1.7m funding from The Federal Ministry of Education and Research.
28th July 2016


Research documents


Sign up to view our publications

Sign up

Sign up to view our downloads

Sign up

Building IoT products for smart healthcare market
8th February 2018
United Kingdom Cocoon Networks, London
Medical Japan 2018
21st February 2018
Japan INTEX Osaka
Med-Tech Innovation Expo 2018
25th April 2018
United Kingdom Ricoh Arena, Coventry