Research

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Do our brain cells die as we age? Researchers say no

Do our brain cells die as we age? Researchers say no
  Research shows that older adults can still grow new brain cells. It has become conventional wisdom that older adults’ brains can’t crank out as many new cells as younger ones do. Mental decline was all but certain as people aged. Getting older? Some good news, apparently the brain never stops growing!
20th April 2018

Grafted organoids provide insight into neurological disorders

Grafted organoids provide insight into neurological disorders
Many neurological disorders—Alzheimer’s, schizophrenia, autism, even depression—have lagged behind in new therapies. Because the brain is so complex, it can be difficult to discover new drugs and even when a drug is promising in animal models, it often doesn’t work for humans. Scientists are aiming to change that with stem cell technology by taking skin cells from a patient and turning those cells into neurons.
18th April 2018

Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system ensure thick insulation

Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system ensure thick insulation
  ETH researchers have revealed that Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system largely produce their own fatty acids in order to create electrical insulation for nerve fibres. This process relies on an enzyme whose absence leads to defective insulation and impaired motor function.
9th March 2018


Model provides better understanding of cancer spread

Model provides better understanding of cancer spread
Purdue researcher Luis Solorio has helped create a lifelike cancer environment out of polymer to better predict how drugs might stop its course. Previous research has shown that most cancer deaths happen because of how it spreads, or metastasises, in the body. A major hurdle for treating cancer is not being able to experiment with metastasis itself and knock out what it needs to spread.
6th March 2018

Skin bacteria could help protect against skin cancer

Skin bacteria could help protect against skin cancer
In a study published in Science Advances, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers report a potential new role for some bacteria on the skin: protecting against cancer. “We have identified a strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis, common on healthy human skin, that exerts a selective ability to inhibit the growth of some cancers,” said Richard Gallo, MD, PhD, Distinguished Professor and chair of the Department of Dermatology at UC San Diego School of Medicine.
5th March 2018

Staining extremophile microorganisms with fluorescent dyes

Staining extremophile microorganisms with fluorescent dyes
Researchers from MIPT and their colleagues from Research Center Juelich (Germany) and Dmitry Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia have described a new method for studying microorganisms that can survive in extreme conditions. The scientists identified a fluorescent dye that enabled them to observe the life cycle of bacteria in real time.
1st March 2018

Mapping the neural circuit regulating thirst

Mapping the neural circuit regulating thirst
There are few feelings more satisfying than gulping down water when you are thirsty. But how does your brain know when you are dehydrated or satiated, and how does it use this information to initiate or terminate drinking? Caltech scientists have now mapped the circuit of neurons within the mouse brain that regulates thirst by stimulating and suppressing the drive to drink water. This circuit offers insight into thirst regulation in the mammalian brain, possibly including humans.
1st March 2018

Microfluidic device brings single-cell tech to the bedside

Microfluidic device brings single-cell tech to the bedside
  Single-cell analysis holds enormous potential to study how individual cells influence disease and respond to treatment, but the lack of cost-effective and user-friendly instrumentation remains challenging.
28th February 2018

CRISPR/Cas9-guided activation to investigate X syndrome neurons

CRISPR/Cas9-guided activation to investigate X syndrome neurons
Fragile X syndrome is the most frequent cause of intellectual disability in males, affecting one out of every 3,600 boys born. The syndrome can also cause autistic traits, such as social and communication deficits, as well as attention problems and hyperactivity. Currently, there is no cure for this disorder. Fragile X syndrome is caused by mutations in the FMR1 gene on the X chromosome, which prevent the gene’s expression.
27th February 2018

A ‘weather map’ that forecasts antibiotic resistance

A ‘weather map’ that forecasts antibiotic resistance
The resistance that infectious microbes have to antibiotics makes it difficult for physicians to confidently select the right drug to treat an infection. And that resistance is dynamic: It changes from year to year and varies across a region. To help choose the best antibiotic first, researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison are drawing inspiration from another dynamic process — the weather.
26th February 2018


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