Research

Displaying 1 - 10 of 250

A method to study neurodegenerative diseases in the lab

A method to study neurodegenerative diseases in the lab
KU Leuven scientists present a new way to generate oligodendrocytes, building blocks of the brain that play a crucial role in neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis and ALS. The method makes it much easier to study these cells and explore their therapeutic potential. All stem cells are immature, and pluripotent stem cells are the most immature among them: they can give rise to all different cell types of the body.
12th January 2018

Sweet like stress detection

Sweet like stress detection
Global research and innovation hub in nanoelectronics and digital technologies, imec, has announced that it has collected the largest multisensor dataset worldwide on stress detection. imec’s Stress in the Work Environment (SWEET) study captured data from more than 1,000 people and is the first large-scale study that used clinical-grade wearables to establish the link between mental stress and physiological symptoms in daily life.
11th January 2018

Modelling approach effectively predicts cancer tumour growth

Modelling approach effectively predicts cancer tumour growth
  A new and more effective method of predicting how cancer tumours grow and spread has been developed by a team of researchers in the US. Their study, published in the journal Convergent Science Physical Oncology, reports a new computational modelling approach, which fits more closely than previous models with the tumour behaviour seen in experimental observations.
3rd January 2018


Methodology increases resolution in oligodendrocyte proteomics

Methodology increases resolution in oligodendrocyte proteomics
One of the key challenges of proteomics, the study of all proteins expressed by a cell or organism, is managing to distinguish between molecules that are structurally different yet have the same mass. This is hard because a mass spectrometer, the main apparatus used in this type of study, works like a weighing scale, sorting the molecules analysed according to their mass.
3rd January 2018

Understanding the roots of CAVD

Understanding the roots of CAVD
The diminutive size of our aortic valve belies its essential role in pushing oxygen-rich blood from the heart into the aorta, our body’s largest vessel, and from there to all other organs. Yet for decades, researchers have focused less on damaged valves than on atherosclerosis, the gradual hardening of the blood vessels themselves. Thanks, in part, to pigs at the University of Wisconsin–Madison’s Arlington Agricultural Research Station, scientists are catching up on understanding the roots of CAVD.
3rd January 2018

Computer model sheds light on sudden cardiac death

Computer model sheds light on sudden cardiac death
Some heart disease patients face a higher risk of sudden cardiac death, which can happen when an arrhythmia—an irregular heartbeat—disrupts the normal electrical activity in the heart and causes the organ to stop pumping. However, arrhythmias linked to sudden cardiac death are very rare, making it difficult to study how they occur—and how they might be prevented.
11th December 2017

BioMimics: highly realistic 3D-printed models of human anatomy

BioMimics: highly realistic 3D-printed models of human anatomy
Stratasys has unveiled BioMimics – a highly advanced capability to 3D print medical models that are engineered to meet demands of the industry’s leading hospitals, researchers and medical device manufacturers. Offered initially in North America as a service through Stratasys Direct Manufacturing, BioMimics provides incredibly realistic, functionally-accurate 3D printed replicas of complex anatomical structures - empowering more effective medical training, education and advanced device testing.
11th December 2017

Study examines the interaction of human cancer inhibitors

Study examines the interaction of human cancer inhibitors
Medications which block enzymes belonging to the kinase family, are among the most effective pharmaceuticals for targeted cancer therapies. Scientists at the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have examined 243 kinase inhibitors which are either approved drugs or have been tested in clinical trials. According to results published in Science, some of these may have more applications than previously thought.
5th December 2017

Turtles help advance understanding of lung abnormality

Turtles help advance understanding of lung abnormality
A study of an unusual snapping turtle with one lung found shared characteristics with humans born with one lung who survive beyond infancy. Digital 3D anatomical models created by Emma Schachner, PhD, Assistant Professor of Cell Biology & Anatomy at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, made the detailed research possible. The work is published in The Journal of Anatomy, the cover of which features an image of the study's 3D models.
27th November 2017

Flexibility is at the heart of human intelligence

Flexibility is at the heart of human intelligence
  Centuries of study have yielded many theories about how the brain gives rise to human intelligence. Some neuroscientists think intelligence springs from a single region or neural network. Others argue that metabolism or the efficiency with which brain cells make use of essential resources are key.
21st November 2017


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Building IoT products for smart healthcare market
8th February 2018
United Kingdom Cocoon Networks, London
Medical Japan 2018
21st February 2018
Japan INTEX Osaka
Med-Tech Innovation Expo 2018
25th April 2018
United Kingdom Ricoh Arena, Coventry