Prosthesis

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Kinesthetic feedback improves control of prosthetic devices

Kinesthetic feedback improves control of prosthetic devices
Researchers at Cleveland Clinic have introduced a system that recreates so-called kinesthetic perception and significantly improves the dexterity of individuals using hand prostheses. Their technology involves vibrators that stimulate the muscles that are used to control the movement of prostheses. As the fingers of the device are opened and closed, vibrations are induced, the nature of which reveals to the user where their hand is.
21st March 2018

Brain perceives prosthetic devices as real hands

Brain perceives prosthetic devices as real hands
The human brain can take advantage of brain resources originally devoted to the hand to represent a prosthetic limb, a new UCL-led study concludes. Among people with only one hand, the brain area that enables us to recognise hands can also recognise a prosthetic hand, particularly among those who use a prosthesis regularly, according to the Brain paper. The study provides the first account of how artificial limbs are represented in the brains of amputees.
14th March 2018

Adaptive powered knee prosthesis assists amputees

Adaptive powered knee prosthesis assists amputees
North Carolina State University research into wearable robotics shows how amputees wearing these devices adapted when presented with a real-world challenge: carrying a weighted backpack. The results could assist device manufacturers and clinicians expand the utility of these important devices, and could help researchers develop smarter controllers that adapt to real-world demands.
6th November 2017


Brain rewires itself to adjust to advanced prostheses

Brain rewires itself to adjust to advanced prostheses
  EPFL scientists from the Center for Neuroprosthetics have used functional MRI to show how the brain re-maps motor and sensory pathways following targeted motor and sensory reinnervation (TMSR), a neuroprosthetic approach where residual limb nerves are rerouted towards intact muscles and skin regions to control a robotic limb.
30th October 2017

Flexible skin for prosthetics can sense shear force

Flexible skin for prosthetics can sense shear force
If a robot is sent to disable a roadside bomb — or delicately handle an egg while cooking you an omelet — it needs to be able to sense when objects are slipping out of its grasp. Yet to date it’s been difficult or impossible for most robotic and prosthetic hands to accurately sense the vibrations and shear forces that occur, for example, when a finger is sliding along a tabletop or when an object begins to fall.
23rd October 2017

Investigating the competitive neuroprosthetics market

Investigating the competitive neuroprosthetics market
The market for cochlear implants, retinal implants and neuroprosthetic limbs is expected to reach $18bn by 2028. The new IDTechEx Research report, Neuroprosthetics 2018-2028: Technologies, Forecasts, Players, covers this competitive landscape. An analysis of patent timelines and major developments alongside the most recent technologies is provided for major players in each respective category. These timelines are particularly useful in answering a number of interesting questions for this field.
21st August 2017

'Proprioceptive' feedback tests prosthetic hand

'Proprioceptive' feedback tests prosthetic hand
Engineers working to add 'muscle sense' to prosthetic limbs found that tactile feedback on the skin allowed blindfolded test subjects to more than double their ability to discern the size of objects grasped with a prosthetic hand. The results will be presented next month in Germany by researchers from Rice University and the Research Center 'E.Piaggio' of the University of Pisa and the Italian Institute of Technology (IIT).
31st May 2017

Mediating sensations via osseointegrated prostheses

A study has found that people with a prosthesis attached directly to their skeleton can hear by means of vibrations in their implant. This sound transmission through bones is an important part of osseoperception - sensory awareness of the patient's surroundings provided by their prosthesis. The discovery sheds new light on the tactile and auditory perception of humans and can be used to develop improved prostheses.
7th April 2017

'Synthetic skin' could lead to advanced prosthetic limbs

'Synthetic skin' could lead to advanced prosthetic limbs
Engineers from the University of Glasgow, who have previously developed an 'electronic skin' covering for prosthetic hands made from graphene, have found a way to use some of graphene's remarkable physical properties to use energy from the sun to power the skin. Graphene is a highly flexible form of graphite which, despite being just a single atom thick, is stronger than steel, electrically conductive, and transparent.
23rd March 2017

Prosthetic arm tech detects spinal nerve signals

Prosthetic arm tech detects spinal nerve signals
Scientists have developed sensor technology for a robotic prosthetic arm that detects signals from nerves in the spinal cord. To control the prosthetic, the patient has to think like they are controlling a phantom arm and imagine some simple manoeuvres, such as pinching two fingers together. The sensor technology interprets the electrical signals sent from spinal motor neurons and uses them as commands.
7th February 2017


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