Prophylaxis

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Special antibodies could lead to HIV vaccine

Special antibodies could lead to HIV vaccine
Around one percent of people infected with HIV produce antibodies that block most strains of the virus. These broadly acting antibodies provide the key to developing an effective vaccine against HIV. Researchers from the University of Zurich and the University Hospital Zurich have now shown that the genome of the HI virus is a decisive factor in determining which antibodies are formed.
11th September 2018

VR headset reduces children's fear of needles

VR headset reduces children's fear of needles
The scenario is all too familiar for the majority of parents. The crying, the screaming and the tantrums as they try to coax their children into the doctor’s office for routine immunisations. After all, who can’t relate to being fearful and anxious about needles? Needle phobia is one of the most common fears among children who receive vaccines and they are exposed to needles on numerous occasions throughout their childhood.
19th June 2018

A type of vaccine based on spider silk

A type of vaccine based on spider silk
To fight cancer, researchers increasingly use vaccines that stimulate the immune system to identify and destroy tumour cells. However, the desired immune response is is not always guaranteed.
18th June 2018


Glowing contact lens could prevent cause of blindness

Glowing contact lens could prevent cause of blindness
Hundreds of millions of people suffer from diabetes worldwide, putting them at risk for a creeping blindness, or diabetic retinopathy, that comes with the disease in its more advanced stages. Existing treatments, though effective, are painful and invasive, involving lasers and injections into the eyeball. Caltech graduate student Colin Cook (MS '16) thinks there's a better way.
24th April 2018

Making use of social media to predict syphilis trends

Making use of social media to predict syphilis trends
UCLA-led research found that internet search terms and tweets related to sexual risk behaviours can predict when and where syphilis trends will occur. Two studies from the UCLA-based University of California Institute for Prediction Technology, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC, found an association between certain risk-related terms that Google and Twitter users researched or tweeted about and subsequent syphilis trends that were reported to the CDC.
20th April 2018

Artificial mole presents an early warning sign

Artificial mole presents an early warning sign
ETH researchers working with Martin Fussenegger have developed an early warning system for the four most common types of cancer. Should a tumour develop, a visible mole will appear on the skin. Alongside cardiovascular disease, cancer has become the top cause of death in industrialised countries. Many of those affected are diagnosed only after the tumour has developed extensively.
20th April 2018

Septal occluder for PFO closure receives FDA approval

Septal occluder for PFO closure receives FDA approval
Following the unprecedented Gore REDUCE Clinical Study conclusion that closure of patent foramen ovale (PFO) can prevent recurrent ischemic strokes, W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. (Gore) has received approval from the FDA for an expanded indication for its GORE CARDIOFORM Septal Occluder. The device, already approved for closure of atrial septal defects (ASDs) up to 17 mm, is now also approved for the closure of PFO to reduce the risk of recurrent ischemic stroke in certain patients.
9th April 2018

A ‘weather map’ that forecasts antibiotic resistance

A ‘weather map’ that forecasts antibiotic resistance
The resistance that infectious microbes have to antibiotics makes it difficult for physicians to confidently select the right drug to treat an infection. And that resistance is dynamic: It changes from year to year and varies across a region. To help choose the best antibiotic first, researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison are drawing inspiration from another dynamic process — the weather.
26th February 2018

Gut microbes can protect against high blood pressure

Gut microbes can protect against high blood pressure
Microbes living in your gut may help protect against the effects of a high-salt diet, according to a new study from MIT. The MIT team, working with researchers in Germany, found that in both mice and humans, a high-salt diet shrinks the population of a certain type of beneficial bacteria. As a result, pro-inflammatory immune cells called Th-17 cells grow in number. These immune cells have been linked with high blood pressure, although the exact mechanism of how they contribute to hypertension is not yet known.
16th November 2017

Device monitors blister pack drug usage

Device monitors blister pack drug usage
Smart pill bottle caps have existed for a while now. But, most of the world relies on blister packs and a new product will soon be able to track those as well. The Popit Sense device is a small plastic dongle that bites into and tightly attaches to just about any blister pack, and then senses every time a pill has been popped out. Timo Heikkilä and Teemu Piirainen are the co-founders of Popit Ltd., a Finnish company which intends to produce technology to help patients, providers, and researchers.
14th November 2017


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IoT Solutions World Congress 2018
16th October 2018
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17th October 2018
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