Neuro

Displaying 21 - 30 of 148

EEG system achieves highest signal resolution

EEG system achieves highest signal resolution
Carnegie Mellon University engineers and cognitive neuroscientists have demonstrated that a new high-density EEG can capture the brain’s neural activity at a higher spatial resolution than ever before. This next generation brain-interface technology is the first non-invasive, high-resolution system of its kind, providing higher density and coverage than any existing system. It has the potential to revolutionise future clinical and neuroscience research as well as brain-computer interfaces.
11th December 2017

'Getting in sync' with your baby

'Getting in sync' with your baby
Making eye contact with an infant makes adults’ and babies’ brainwaves ‘get in sync’ with each other – which is likely to support communication and learning – according to researchers at the University of Cambridge. When a parent and infant interact, various aspects of their behaviour can synchronise, including their gaze, emotions and heartrate, but little is known about whether their brain activity also synchronises – and what the consequences of this might be.
29th November 2017

Brain stimulation improves cognition in Parkinson's disease

Brain stimulation improves cognition in Parkinson's disease
A multidisciplinary neuroscience study using rare, intraoperative brain recordings suggests that low frequency stimulation of a deep brain region may be able to improve cognitive function in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The study findings, published in the journal Brain, also hint at the broader potential of brain stimulation for treating other cognitive diseases.
28th November 2017


First whole-brain map shows key to forming memories

First whole-brain map shows key to forming memories
A team of neuroscientists at the University of Pennsylvania has constructed the first whole-brain map of electrical connectivity in the brain based on data from nearly 300 neurosurgical patients with electrodes implanted directly on the brain. The researchers found that low-frequency rhythms of brain activity, when brain waves move up and down slowly, primarily drive communication between the frontal, temporal and medial temporal lobes, key brain regions that engage during memory processing.
23rd November 2017

Brain's ability to decode pitch improves cochlear implants

Brain's ability to decode pitch improves cochlear implants
For decades, scientists have debated how humans perceive pitch, and how the ear and the brain transmit pitch information in a sound. There are two prevalent theories: place and time. The “time code” theory argues that pitch is a matter of auditory nerve fibre firing rate, while the 'place code' theory focuses on where in the inner ear a sound activates. Now a study bolsters support for the place code. These findings, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, could inform further development of the cochlear implant.
22nd November 2017

Brain stimulation can change how much we enjoy music

Brain stimulation can change how much we enjoy music
Enjoyment of music is considered a subjective experience; what one person finds gratifying, another may find irritating. Music theorists have long emphasised that although musical taste is relative, our enjoyment of music, be it classical or heavy metal, arises, among other aspects, from structural features of music, such as chord or rhythm patterns that generate anticipation and expectancy.
21st November 2017

Flexibility is at the heart of human intelligence

Flexibility is at the heart of human intelligence
  Centuries of study have yielded many theories about how the brain gives rise to human intelligence. Some neuroscientists think intelligence springs from a single region or neural network. Others argue that metabolism or the efficiency with which brain cells make use of essential resources are key.
21st November 2017

Hibernating squirrels inspire alternative stroke treatments

Hibernating squirrels inspire alternative stroke treatments
In the fight against brain damage caused by stroke, researchers have turned to an unlikely source of inspiration: hibernating ground squirrels. While the animals' brains experience dramatically reduced blood flow during hibernation, just like human patients after a certain type of stroke, the squirrels emerge from their extended naps suffering no ill effects.
20th November 2017

Ultrafast light pulses can trigger neuron activity

Ultrafast light pulses can trigger neuron activity
Specially tailored, ultrafast pulses of light can trigger neurons to fire and could one day help patients with light-sensitive circadian or mood problems, according to a new study in mice at the University of Illinois. Chemists have used such carefully crafted light beams, called coherent control, to regulate chemical reactions, but this study is the first demonstration of using them to control function in a living cell.
20th November 2017

Take an immersive 3D voyage through the brain

Take an immersive 3D voyage through the brain
An immersive VR experience now offers a unique way to visualise and interact with large volumes of 3D anatomical brain data. The system, developed by researchers from the Wyss Center for Bio and Neuroengineering and the University of Geneva, has applications in neurotechnology development, research and surgeon training. A poster describing the system will be presented on Wednesday 15 November at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience 2017, in Washington DC.
17th November 2017


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