Neuro

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Successful implementation of prosthetic memory in humans

Successful implementation of prosthetic memory in humans
Scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and the University of Southern California (USC) have demonstrated the successful implementation of a prosthetic system that uses a person’s own memory patterns to facilitate the brain’s ability to encode and recall memory. In the pilot study, published in the Journal of Neural Engineering, participants’ short-term memory performance showed a 35 to 37% improvement over baseline measurements.
11th April 2018

Ultrathin endoscope captures neurons firing in the brain

Ultrathin endoscope captures neurons firing in the brain
  Researchers have developed an endoscope as thin as a human hair that can image the activity of neurons in the brains of living mice. Because it is so thin, the endoscope can reach deep into the brain, giving researchers access to areas that cannot be seen with microscopes or other types of endoscopes.
28th March 2018

Unlocking the secrets of the human brain with honeybees

Unlocking the secrets of the human brain with honeybees
  It has been discovered by researchers from the University of Sheffield that looking at honeybees in a colony in the same way as neurons in a brain could help us better understand the basic mechanisms of human behaviour.
27th March 2018


Brain scanner allows patients to move freely

Brain scanner allows patients to move freely
A new generation of brain scanner, that can be worn like a helmet allowing patients to move naturally whilst being scanned, has been developed by researchers at the Sir Peter Mansfield Imaging Centre, University of Nottingham and the Wellcome Centre for Human Neuroimaging, UCL. It is part of a five-year Wellcome funded project which has the potential to revolutionise the world of human brain imaging.
26th March 2018

'Brain stethoscope' turns brain waves into sound

'Brain stethoscope' turns brain waves into sound
When a doctor or nurse suspects something is wrong with a patient’s heart, there’s a simple way to check: put a stethoscope over the heart and listen to the sounds it makes. Doctors and nurses can use the same diagnostic tool to figure out what’s going on with the heart, lungs, stomach and more, but not the brain – although that could change with a new device.
23rd March 2018

Kinesthetic feedback improves control of prosthetic devices

Kinesthetic feedback improves control of prosthetic devices
Researchers at Cleveland Clinic have introduced a system that recreates so-called kinesthetic perception and significantly improves the dexterity of individuals using hand prostheses. Their technology involves vibrators that stimulate the muscles that are used to control the movement of prostheses. As the fingers of the device are opened and closed, vibrations are induced, the nature of which reveals to the user where their hand is.
21st March 2018

Brain perceives prosthetic devices as real hands

Brain perceives prosthetic devices as real hands
The human brain can take advantage of brain resources originally devoted to the hand to represent a prosthetic limb, a new UCL-led study concludes. Among people with only one hand, the brain area that enables us to recognise hands can also recognise a prosthetic hand, particularly among those who use a prosthesis regularly, according to the Brain paper. The study provides the first account of how artificial limbs are represented in the brains of amputees.
14th March 2018

Measuring brain signals with soft electronics

Measuring brain signals with soft electronics
Klas Tybrandt, principal investigator at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, has developed a new technology for long-term stable neural recording. It is based on a novel elastic material composite, which is biocompatible and retains high electrical conductivity even when stretched to double its original length. The result has been achieved in collaboration with colleagues in Zürich and New York.
9th March 2018

Determining whether people understand what they hear

Determining whether people understand what they hear
Neuroscientists from KU Leuven measure brainwaves to determine whether people understand what they hear. The new technique was developed by Professor Tom Francart and his colleagues from the Department of Neurosciences at KU Leuven in collaboration with the University of Maryland. It will allow for a more accurate diagnosis of patients who cannot actively participate in a speech understanding test because they’re too young, for instance, or because they’re in a coma.
9th March 2018

Enabling simulations of large parts of the brain

Enabling simulations of large parts of the brain
Brain activity simulations are a critical part of neuroscience research, but advances in this type of computing have been held back by the same thing that frustrates pretty much anything you use a computer for – namely, memory. The future of supercomputing promises immense resources for technologies such as the neuronal network simulator, NEST. The challenge today is to work out how to make optimal use of these resources.
9th March 2018


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