Neuro

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'Brain on a chip' tracks how the brain folds

'Brain on a chip' tracks how the brain folds
Being born with a 'tabula rasa' – a clean slate – in the case of the brain is something of a curse. Our brains are already wrinkled like walnuts by the time we are born. Babies born without these wrinkles – smooth brain syndrome – suffer from severe developmental deficiencies and their life expectancy is markedly reduced. The gene that causes this syndrome recently helped Weizmann Institute of Science researchers to probe the physical forces that cause the brain’s wrinkles to form.
21st February 2018

Method investigates brain function and its ageing

Method investigates brain function and its ageing
Physicists have devised a method of investigating brain function, opening a frontier in the diagnoses of neurodegenerative and ageing related diseases. This new non-invasive technique could potentially be used for any diagnosis based on cardiovascular and metabolic-related diseases of the brain. The researchers at Lancaster University and the Medical University of Gdansk (Poland) deciphered oscillations in the cerebrospinal fluid which lies between the scalp and skull.
21st February 2018

Brain-inspired tech brings data processing to IoT devices

Brain-inspired tech brings data processing to IoT devices
A forward-looking call to action for the microelectronics industry has been issued by CEA-Leti’s chief scientist to create a radically new, digital-communication architecture for the Internet of Things in which “a great deal of analytics processing occurs at the edge and at the end devices instead of in the Cloud.”
16th February 2018


Model could lead to treatments for Alzheimer’s

Model could lead to treatments for Alzheimer’s
A protocol developed in Sweden has the potential for industrial-scale production of the brain helper cells known as astrocytes. The research team's work could help medical science develop treatments for such diseases as Alzheimer’s. Star shaped cells that are found in the brain and spine, astrocytes were long thought to be the 'glue' that binds nerve cells; but recent advances show that they are much more.
16th February 2018

Headset uses tDCS to stimulate the brain

Headset uses tDCS to stimulate the brain
Created by Halo Neuroscience, a Silicon Valley firm founded by Dr. Daniel Chao and Dr. Brett Wingeier, the Halo Sport uses a process called transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to stimulate the brain. It sends a low level electric current of around 1.4 to 2.2 milliamps to a targeted region of the brain to excite the neurons, effectively “priming” them to be more likely to fire and create new neural pathways. This means that the brain temporarily becomes better at hard-coding what you are doing.
14th February 2018

Neuro electrical stimulation improves memory

Neuro electrical stimulation improves memory
Tickling the brain with low-intensity electrical stimulation in a specific area can improve verbal short-term memory. Mayo Clinic researchers report their findings in Brain. The researchers found word recall was enhanced with stimulation of the brain’s lateral temporal cortex, the regions on the sides of the head by the temples and ears. Patients recalled more words from a previously viewed list when low-amplitude electrical stimulation was delivered to the brain.
30th January 2018

Technique evaluates the effect of drugs on the brain

Technique evaluates the effect of drugs on the brain
An international team led by ETH researchers has developed a technique that uses electrical brain signals to more precisely evaluate the effect of drugs on the brain. It could be of particular use in the early development phase of anti-epilepsy medication. There are still comparatively few treatments available for brain diseases. Among other reasons, this is due to the difficulty of developing new drugs, as it is not easy to establish the effects and side effects of a substance on the brain.
30th January 2018

Superconducting switch could be key to artificial brains

Superconducting switch could be key to artificial brains
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have built a superconducting switch that 'learns' like a biological system and could connect processors and store memories in future computers operating like the human brain. The NIST switch, described in Science Advances, is called a synapse, like its biological counterpart, and it supplies a missing piece for so-called neuromorphic computers.
29th January 2018

People with tetraplegia gain use of brain-computer interface

People with tetraplegia gain use of brain-computer interface
For a brain-computer interface (BCI) to be truly useful for a person with tetraplegia, it should be ready whenever it’s needed, with minimal expert intervention, including the very first time it’s used. In a new study in the Journal of Neural Engineering, researchers in the BrainGate* collaboration demonstrate new techniques that allowed three participants to achieve peak BCI performance within three minutes of engaging in an easy, one-step process.
26th January 2018

Ultra-thin needle delivers drugs directly to the brain

Ultra-thin needle delivers drugs directly to the brain
  MIT researchers have devised a miniaturised system that can deliver tiny quantities of medicine to brain regions as small as 1 cubic millimetre. This type of targeted dosing could make it possible to treat diseases that affect very specific brain circuits, without interfering with the normal function of the rest of the brain, the researchers say.
25th January 2018


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Med-Tech Innovation Expo 2018
25th April 2018
United Kingdom Ricoh Arena, Coventry