Nanomedicine

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Nanoparticle technology could help treat ATC

Nanoparticle technology could help treat ATC
Investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital, together with collaborators from Massachusetts General Hospital, have developed an innovative nanoplatform that allows them to effectively deliver RNA interference (RNAi) agents to the sites of cancer and suppress tumor growth and reduce metastasis in preclinical models of anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC). Their results appear in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
21st June 2016

Personalised medicine employs computer algorithms

Personalised medicine employs computer algorithms
Scientists from ITMO University, the Federal Research and Clinical Centre of Physical-Chemical Medicine and MIPT have developed a software program that quickly compares sets of DNA of microorganisms living in different environments. Using the algorithm to compare the microflora of a healthy person with the microflora of a patient, specialists could detect previously unknown pathogens and their strains, which can aid the development of personalised medicine. The results of the study have been published in Bioinformatics.
16th June 2016

Nanoprobe enables measurement of proteins in living cells

Nanoprobe enables measurement of proteins in living cells
A team of researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Rowland Institute at Harvard University have used a specialised nanoprobe developed by the Harvard/Rowland investigators to directly measure levels of key proteins within living, cultured cells. As described in the journal Nano Letters, the investigators used the device to track levels of the Alzheimer's-disease-associated proteins amyloid-beta (A-beta) and tau in neurons and other cells exposed to an anesthetic known to produce Alzheimer's-like changes in the brains of mice.
15th June 2016


Prodding leukemia cells with nanoprobes could provide cancer clues

Giving blood cells a gentle squeeze can reveal a great deal about their health. To find out more, researchers in France have used a tiny force probe to compare the mechanical responses of healthy and cancerous hematopoietic cells (biological structures that help to renew blood in the body).
2nd June 2016

Nanogel delivers possible treatment for cancer

Nanogel delivers possible treatment for cancer
An immunotherapy drug delivery system created at Yale that can carry multiple drugs inside a tiny particle is heading toward its first phase of clinical trials for a possible new treatment for cancer. The delivery system, a nanogel developed in the lab of associate professor Tarek Fahmy, can be used for multiple combinations of drugs for many different cancers and some immune disorders. The platform is designed to deliver multiple drugs with different chemical properties.
8th April 2016

Nanoparticles could treat intestinal inflammation

Nanoparticles could treat intestinal inflammation
Nanoparticles designed to block a cell-surface molecule that plays a key role in inflammation could be a safe treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University and Southwest University in China. The scientists developed nanoparticles, or microscopic particles, to reduce the expression of CD98, a glycoprotein that promotes inflammation. Their findings are published in the journal Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces.
8th April 2016

Nanoparticle reveals cancer treatment effectiveness in real time

Nanoparticle reveals cancer treatment effectiveness in real time
Being able to detect early on whether a cancer therapy is working for a patient can influence the course of treatment and improve outcomes and quality of life. However, conventional detection methods – such as PET scans, CT and MRI – usually cannot detect whether a tumor is shrinking until a patient has received multiple cycles of therapy.
30th March 2016

Chemotherapy drug directed to tumour site through nanoparticles

The overall five-year survival rate for people with pancreatic cancer is just 6%, and there is an urgent need for new treatment options. More than 80% of pancreatic cancer diagnoses occur too late for surgery, making chemotherapy the only possible treatment. Scientists from the California NanoSystems Institute at UCLA and UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have developed a delivery system for one chemotherapy drug that greatly reduces the occurrence of serious side effects while enhancing the drug's effectiveness against pancreatic cancer.
4th March 2016

Engineered nanoparticles deliver cancer drugs to tumours

Engineered nanoparticles deliver cancer drugs to tumours
Chemotherapy isn't supposed to make your hair fall out—it's supposed to kill cancer cells. A new molecular delivery system created at U of T could help ensure that chemotherapy drugs get to their target while minimising collateral damage. Many cancer drugs target fast-growing cells. Injected into a patient, they swirl around in the bloodstream acting on fast-growing cells wherever they find them. That includes tumours, but unfortunately also hair follicles, the lining of your digestive system, and your skin.
19th February 2016

New hydrogel nanoplatform shrinks tumors in mice

Functionalised nanoparticles are one avenue of drug delivery for chemotherapeutics. However, getting nanoparticles to target the tumor site has proven difficult to do. One method researchers have used to target cancer cells is to create hydrogels made of filamentous bacteriophage (phage) and gold nanoparticles. Peptide binding ligands can be incorporated into the phage portion of the hydrogel that will then target known carcinoma cells.
17th February 2016


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