Genetic Eng.

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Gene circuit triggers immune attack

Gene circuit triggers immune attack
Researchers at MIT have developed a synthetic gene circuit that triggers the body’s immune system to attack cancers when it detects signs of the disease. The circuit, which will only activate a therapeutic response when it detects two specific cancer markers, is described in a paper published today in the journal Cell. Immunotherapy is widely seen as having considerable potential in the fight against a range of cancers.
23rd October 2017

Reengineered immune system cells could help fight HIV

Reengineered immune system cells could help fight HIV
Improving on a previous attempt, scientists have developed a new strategy that could potentially be used to reengineer a patient's own immune system cells to fight HIV. The approach, described in PLOS Pathogens, shows benefit in human cell cultures and in mice. White blood cells known as T cells play an important role in the immune system's response to HIV infection, especially if a patient stops taking antiretroviral medications that normally keep the disease under control.
16th October 2017

Screening genes that can protect against Parkinson’s disease

Screening genes that can protect against Parkinson’s disease
Using a modified version of the CRISPR genome-editing system, MIT researchers have developed a new way to screen for genes that protect against specific diseases. CRISPR is normally used to edit or delete genes from living cells. However, the MIT team adapted it to randomly turn on or off distinct gene sets across large populations of cells, allowing the researchers to identify genes that protect cells from a protein associated with Parkinson’s disease.
13th October 2017


Computer program detects differences between human cells

Computer program detects differences between human cells
“How many different cell types are there in the human body? And how do these differences develop? Nobody really knows,” says Professor Stein Aerts from KU Leuven/VIB. But thanks to a new method developed by his team, that may be about to change. Even though each of the cells in our body carries the exact same DNA sequence, there’s a huge variety of cell types and functions. These differences stem from how the DNA sequence is interpreted: not all genes are ‘switched on’ in each cell.
12th October 2017

Mechanism behind ‘DNA scissor’ CRIPSR revealed

A research group at Uppsala University has found out how CRISPR-Cas9 – also known as ‘molecular scissors’ – can search the genome for a specific DNA sequence. Cas9 already has many applications in biotechnology and is also expected to revolutionise medicine. The new research findings show how Cas9 can be improved to make the molecular scissors faster and more reliable.
29th September 2017

The cyber security risks to DNA processing programs

The cyber security risks to DNA processing programs
Rapid improvement in DNA sequencing has sparked a proliferation of medical and genetic tests that promise to reveal everything from one's ancestry to fitness levels to microorganisms that live in your gut. A new study from University of Washington researchers that analysed the security hygiene of common, open-source DNA processing programs finds evidence of poor computer security practices used throughout the field.
10th August 2017

The advancement in regenerative medicine we were waiting for

The advancement in regenerative medicine we were waiting for
Researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and Ohio State's College of Engineering have developed a new technology, Tissue Nanotransfection (TNT), that can generate any cell type of interest for treatment within the patient's own body. This technology may be used to repair injured tissue or restore function of aging tissue, including organs, blood vessels and nerve cells.
8th August 2017

Sequencing program could enable precision medicine for advanced cancer

Sequencing program could enable precision medicine for advanced cancer
  In one of the largest and most comprehensive efforts to examine the genetic and molecular landscape of advanced cancer, researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center sequenced the DNA and RNA of 500 patients with metastatic cancer. The results are published in Nature.
3rd August 2017

How to reprogram cells in the immune system

How to reprogram cells in the immune system
When the immune system is imbalanced, either due to overly-active cells or cells that suppress its function, it causes a wide range of diseases, from psoriasis to cancer. By manipulating the function of certain immune cells, called T cells, researchers could help restore the system's balance and create new treatments to target these diseases. Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes revealed, for the first time, a method to reprogram specific T cells.
3rd August 2017

Device detects tumour cells in blood

Device detects tumour cells in blood
Researchers at the URV’s Department of Physical and Inorganic Chemistry, led by the ICREA researcher, Ramon Álvarez Puebla, and the professor of Applied Physics, Francesc Díaz, and the Department of Clinical Oncology of the HM Torrelodones University Hospital, have patented a portable device that can detect tumour cells in blood. The device counts the number of tumour cells in a blood sample in real time and is thus a highly effective tool for improving the monitoring, treatment and diagnosis of cancer.
18th July 2017


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