Genetic Eng.

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Gene-editing may reduce cholesterol by up to 50%

Gene-editing may reduce cholesterol by up to 50%
  Using a variation of CRISPR gene editing may be a potential strategy for mimicking the protective effects of a genetic mutation linked to lower cholesterol levels and heart disease risks, according to new mouse research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania published in Circulation.
28th February 2018

Defeating THOR brings a hammer down on cancer

Defeating THOR brings a hammer down on cancer
It turns out Thor, the Norse god of thunder and the Marvel superhero, has special powers when it comes to cancer too. Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center uncovered a novel gene they named THOR while investigating previously unexplored regions of the human genome - the dark matter of the human genome. They characterised a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that is expressed in humans, mice and zebrafish.
15th December 2017

How privacy policies affect genetic testing

How privacy policies affect genetic testing
Different types of privacy laws in U.S. states produce markedly different effects on the willingness of patients to have genetic testing done, according to a new study co-authored by an MIT professor. As the research shows, policies that focus on the privacy risks of genetic testing, and ask for patient consent to those risks, lead to a reduction in tests performed.
14th December 2017


Blocking genes of antibiotics resistance

Blocking genes of antibiotics resistance
Antibiotics are commonly used around the world to cure diseases caused by bacteria. But as the World Health Organisation and other international bodies have pointed out, the global increase of antibiotic resistance is a rapidly worsening problem. And since antibiotics are also an essential part of modern medicine, as prophylactic treatment during surgeries and cancer therapy, rising resistance of bacteria presents even more of a danger.
27th November 2017

Repair kit improves precision of CRISPR gene editing

Repair kit improves precision of CRISPR gene editing
For the past five years, CRISPR-Cas9 technology has revolutionised the field of gene editing due to its ease and low cost. But although this technology reliably finds and cuts the targeted stretch of DNA sequence, fixing that cut as desired has been something of a hit-or-miss process. Error rates as high as 50% are a particular problem when the goal is to correct typos in the DNA that cause genetic disease.
24th November 2017

Genome editing improves T-cells to attack cancer

Genome editing improves T-cells to attack cancer
Researchers at Cardiff University have found a way to boost the cancer-destroying ability of the immune system’s T-cells, offering new hope in the fight against a wide range of cancers. Using CRISPR genome editing, the team took the genetic engineering of killer T-cells one step further by removing their non-cancer specific receptors and replacing them with ones that would recognise specific cancer cells and destroy them.
21st November 2017

Reprogrammed human cells can hunt cancer

Reprogrammed human cells can hunt cancer
ETH researchers have reprogrammed normal human cells to create designer immune cells capable of detecting and destroying cancer cells. T-cells are one of the immune system’s major weapons. They detect the body’s cells infected with a virus and trigger their ablation, effectively killing the virus. T-cells cannot do the same with cancer cells, however, as they do not recognise them as foreign cells and are therefore unable to eliminate them.
14th November 2017

Boy is given new skin thanks to gene therapy

Boy is given new skin thanks to gene therapy
A medical team at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum's burn unit and the Center for Regenerative Medicine at the University of Modena (Italy) were the first ever to successfully treat a child suffering from extensive skin damage using transplants derived from genetically modified stem cells. The boy is a so-called butterfly child: he suffers from epidermolysis bullosa, a genetic skin disease that had destroyed approximately 80% of his epidermis.
9th November 2017

Old human cells rejuvenated in discovery on aging

Old human cells rejuvenated in discovery on aging
A team led by Professor Lorna Harries, Professor of Molecular Genetics at the University of Exeter, has discovered a new way to rejuvenate inactive senescent cells. Within hours of treatment the older cells started to divide, and had longer telomeres - the 'caps' on the chromosomes which shorten as we age. This discovery, funded by the Dunhill Medical Trust, builds on earlier findings from the Exeter group that showed that a class of genes called splicing factors are progressively switched off as we age.
8th November 2017

Working toward a reversible kind of gene editing

Working toward a reversible kind of gene editing
Scientists are altering a powerful gene-editing technology in hopes of one day fighting diseases without making permanent changes to people's DNA. The trick: Edit RNA instead, the messenger that carries a gene's instructions. "If you edit RNA, you can have a reversible therapy," important in case of side effects, said Feng Zhang of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, a gene-editing pioneer whose team reported the new twist Wednesday in the journal Science.
26th October 2017


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