Diagnosis

Displaying 91 - 100 of 161

Improving cancer diagnosis and follow-up

Improving cancer diagnosis and follow-up
A team of investigators from Cedars-Sinai and UCLA is using a blood-analysis technique and tiny experimental device to help physicians predict which cancers are likely to spread by identifying and characterising tumor cells circulating through the blood. The investigators are conducting "liquid biopsies" by running blood through a postage-stamp-sized chip with nanowires 1,000 times thinner than a human hair and coated with antibodies, or proteins, that recognise circulating tumour cells.
13th February 2017

Diagnosing tumours during brain surgeries

Diagnosing tumours during brain surgeries
If a tumour is suspected during brain surgery, it takes 30-40 minutes from the time of removing the sample from the patient’s brain to the time of diagnosis. The sample is taken through a rigorous process of tissue sectioning, staining, mounting, and interpretation by pathologists. Researchers from University of Michigan have now developed an imaging technique that could significantly reduce the time taken for such diagnoses.
9th February 2017

Myopia cell discovered in retina

Myopia cell discovered in retina
Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered a cell in the retina that may cause myopia when it dysfunctions. The dysfunction may be linked to the amount of time a child spends indoors and away from natural light. "This discovery could lead to a new therapeutic target to control myopia," said Greg Schwartz, lead investigator and assistant professor of ophthalmology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.
9th February 2017


A potential diagnostic for pancreatic cancer

A potential diagnostic for pancreatic cancer
Despite enormous research strides, detection methods for many diseases remain cumbersome and expensive, and often uncover illness only at advanced stages, when patient outcomes can be bleak. One such illness is pancreatic cancer, which may display no obvious symptoms in its early stages, yet can develop aggressively. Indeed, according to the American Cancer Society, a staggering 80% of those stricken with this form of cancer die within 1 year of diagnosis.
7th February 2017

Technique reduces diagnosis time during brain surgery

Technique reduces diagnosis time during brain surgery
An approach to the practice of surgical pathology for brain tumour patients could make for a powerful combination: more accurate, safer and more efficient operations. Neurosurgeons and pathologists at Michigan Medicine are the first to execute stimulated Raman histology, a method that improves speed and diagnostic efficiency, in an operating room. They detail the advance in a Nature Biomedical Engineering paper.
6th February 2017

Radiotracer makes diagnosing prostate cancer easier

Radiotracer makes diagnosing prostate cancer easier
Researchers at the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) have developed a new radiotracer to diagnose prostate cancer and conducted a successful Phase I clinical trial. Phase I trials are typically conducted with a small group of people in order to establish safety and identify any possible side effects. Prostate cancer is the fifth leading cause of death worldwide and is especially difficult to diagnose.
3rd February 2017

Breath monitor device is capable of detecting flu

Breath monitor device is capable of detecting flu
Perena Gouma, a professor in the Materials Science and Engineering Department at The University of Texas at Arlington, has published an article in the journal Sensors that describes her invention of a hand-held breath monitor that can potentially detect the flu virus. The article explains in-depth how the single-exhale sensing device works and the research involved in its creation, which was funded by the National Science Foundation through the Smart Connected Health program.
1st February 2017

Acoustofluidic chip helps detect disease

Acoustofluidic chip helps detect disease
Scientists at Duke University have developed a way of concentrating nanoparticles inside a small device using only sound waves. This achievement may help introduce portable diagnostics that rely on attaching nanoparticles to biomarkers such as proteins and measuring how many find their targets. Nanoparticles tagged with fluorescent markers to make them easier to see are concentrated in a column by a new acoustic whirlpool device.
31st January 2017

Cell counting system aids diagnosis of meningitis

Cell counting system aids diagnosis of meningitis
French researchers from Grenoble Alpes University and Aix-Marseille University have developed an automated lens-free microscopy technique for counting and telling apart red and white blood cells within cerebrospinal fluid. Cerebrospinal fluid, gathered through a spinal tap, should be clear and have few, if any, blood cells within it. Patients with meningitis, due to inflammation and disruption of the membranes enveloping the brain, have white blood cells seeping into the cerebrospinal fluid (>10/μL).
31st January 2017

Deep learning algorithm helps identify skin cancer

Deep learning algorithm helps identify skin cancer
Universal access to health care was on the minds of computer scientists at Stanford when they set out to create an artificially intelligent diagnosis algorithm for skin cancer. They made a database of nearly 130,000 skin disease images and trained their algorithm to visually diagnose potential cancer. From the very first test, it performed with inspiring accuracy.
26th January 2017


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