Diagnosis

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Patch boosts brightness in medical diagnostic tests

Patch boosts brightness in medical diagnostic tests
Fluorescence-based biosensing and bioimaging technologies are widely used in research and clinical settings to detect and image various biological species of interest. While fluorescence-based detection and imaging techniques are convenient to use, they suffer from poor sensitivity. For example, when a patient carries low levels of antigens in the blood or urine, the fluorescent signal can be feeble, making visualisation and diagnosis difficult.
16th July 2018

Expanding diagnostic ultrasound beyond obstetrics in the US

Expanding diagnostic ultrasound beyond obstetrics in the US
Healcerion has launched the SONON 300L handheld ultrasound device to the US market, following FDA approval of this wireless device for primary care providers. It provides flexible ultrasound technology at less than 1/10 the cost of a traditional ultrasound machine, with a user interface anyone can learn in minutes.
16th July 2018

Device detects mosquito-borne diseases

Device detects mosquito-borne diseases
A startup created by Purdue University professors is developing a sensor that can detect dangerous mosquito-borne tropical diseases faster and at a lower cost than current methods, giving health officials time to take action before the viruses are transmitted to humans. SMK Diagnostics has created biosensor technology to identify and monitor diseases such as Zika, which set off a global health crisis in 2015 and 2016, and dengue, which causes about 22,000 deaths a year worldwide, mostly among children.
16th July 2018


‘Smart stent‘ detects narrowing of arteries

‘Smart stent‘ detects narrowing of arteries
For every three individuals who have had a stent implanted to keep clogged arteries open and prevent a heart attack, at least one will experience restenosis—the renewed narrowing of the artery due to plaque buildup or scarring—which can lead to additional complications.
26th June 2018

Tissue-imaging tech could enable real-time diagnostics

Tissue-imaging tech could enable real-time diagnostics
A microscope system can image living tissue in real time and in molecular detail, without any chemicals or dyes, report researchers at the University of Illinois. The system uses precisely tailored pulses of light to simultaneously image with multiple wavelengths. This enables the researchers to study concurrent processes within cells and tissue, and could give cancer researchers a new tool for tracking tumour progression and physicians new technology for tissue pathology and diagnostics.
22nd June 2018

World’s first high-field MR-linac receives CE mark

World’s first high-field MR-linac receives CE mark
Elekta has announced that its Elekta Unity magnetic resonance radiation therapy (MR/RT) system has received CE mark, clearing the technology for commercial sales and clinical use in Europe. “Receiving CE mark for Unity is a big achievement in revolutionising the field of radiation therapy and a real watershed moment for treating cancer,” said Richard Hausmann, President and CEO, Elekta.
20th June 2018

Laser-sonic scanner aims to replace mammograms

Laser-sonic scanner aims to replace mammograms
For women over 40, mammography is a necessary yet annoying procedure to endure every year or two. The technique, while valuable for reducing breast cancer deaths, is less than ideal because it exposes patients to X-ray radiation and requires their breasts to be painfully squished between plates. The plates flatten the breast so the X-rays can more easily pass through it and produce a clear image.
19th June 2018

AI is fighting back in the battle against cancer

AI is fighting back in the battle against cancer
Artificial Intelligence (AI) has had its fair share of negative media coverage in recent months. As the technology becomes increasingly sophisticated and moves more to the fore in our daily lives, so the doomsayers have turned up the volume when warning of the dangers of machine intelligence. 
12th June 2018

Ingestible bacteria on a chip could help diagnose disease

Ingestible bacteria on a chip could help diagnose disease
MIT researchers have built an ingestible sensor equipped with genetically engineered bacteria that can diagnose bleeding in the stomach or other gastrointestinal problems. This 'bacteria-on-a-chip' approach combines sensors made from living cells with ultra-low-power electronics that convert the bacterial response into a wireless signal that can be read by a smartphone.
25th May 2018

AI improves stroke and dementia diagnosis in brain scans

AI improves stroke and dementia diagnosis in brain scans
Machine learning has detected one of the commonest causes of dementia and stroke, in brain scans (CT), more accurately than current methods. A software, created by scientists at Imperial College London and the University of Edinburgh, has been able to identify and measure the severity of small vessel disease, one of the commonest causes of stroke and dementia. The study, published in Radiology, took place at Charing Cross Hospital, part of Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust.
23rd May 2018


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