Wyss Institute

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Wyss Institute articles

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Making personalised medicine a reality

Making personalised medicine a reality
The small intestine is the main site where we digest and absorb nutrients and minerals from food, and it is also a place where many intestinal infections occur and digestive and inflammatory disorders manifest themselves. To better understand the intestine in its normal and pathological states, researchers have created 'organoids' by isolating intestinal stem cells from human biopsy samples.
19th February 2018

Growing patient-specific T cells could aid immunotherapies

Growing patient-specific T cells could aid immunotherapies
Immunologists and oncologists are harnessing the body’s immune system to fight cancers and other diseases with adoptive cell transfer techniques. In a normal immune response, a type of white blood cell known as T cells are instructed by another kind of immune cell called an antigen-presenting cell (APC) to expand their numbers and stay alive.
17th January 2018

Providing insight into anti-inflammatory drug candidate

Providing insight into anti-inflammatory drug candidate
  One of the most important and fraught processes in the human body is inflammation. Inflammatory responses to injury or disease are crucial for recruiting the immune system to help the body heal, but inflammation can also cause dangerous blood clots and other conditions by inducing an overproduction of the coagulant protein thrombin.
16th January 2018


Take an immersive 3D voyage through the brain

Take an immersive 3D voyage through the brain
An immersive VR experience now offers a unique way to visualise and interact with large volumes of 3D anatomical brain data. The system, developed by researchers from the Wyss Center for Bio and Neuroengineering and the University of Geneva, has applications in neurotechnology development, research and surgeon training. A poster describing the system will be presented on Wednesday 15 November at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience 2017, in Washington DC.
17th November 2017

A cheap and accurate test for biomarkers

A cheap and accurate test for biomarkers
  Engineered strands of DNA — nanoscale tools called “nanoswitches” — could be the key to faster, easier, cheaper and more sensitive tests that can enable high-fidelity detection of biomarkers indicating the presence of different diseases, viral strains and even genetic variabilities as subtle as a single-gene mutation.
13th September 2017

Adhesive remains tough and resilient when wet

Adhesive remains tough and resilient when wet
  A team of researchers from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) has created a super-strong 'tough adhesive' that is biocompatible and binds to tissues with a strength comparable to the body’s own resilient cartilage, even when they’re wet.
2nd August 2017

Robotic suit improves walking in stroke patients

Robotic suit improves walking in stroke patients
To help stroke patients regain their walking abilities, various robotics groups from industry and academia are developing powered wearable devices - so-called exoskeletons - that can restore gait functions or assist with rehabilitation. Historically, these systems restricted patients to a treadmill in a clinical setting, but in recent years portable systems have been developed that enable walking overground.
27th July 2017

Organ-on-chip senses electrical activity and cell resistance

Organ-on-chip senses electrical activity and cell resistance
Organ-on-chip technology promises to help speed up and improve research on how potential new drugs will interact with the body’s own organs. Additionally, it may alleviate the need for in-animal studies that can be difficult to perform and that too often produce misleading results. Organs-on-chip are essentially specialised microfluidic devices within which living cells are grown, supported, and experimented on.
16th June 2017

Next-gen heart valve regenerates into heart-like tissue

Next-gen heart valve regenerates into heart-like tissue
A team lead by Kevin Kit Parker, Ph.D. at Harvard University's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering recently developed a nanofibre fabrication technique to rapidly manufacture heart valves with regenerative and growth potential. In a paper published in Biomaterials, Andrew Capulli, Ph.D. and colleagues fabricated a valve-shaped nanofibre network that mimics the mechanical and chemical properties of the native valve extracellular matrix (ECM).
19th May 2017

Brain-computer interface allows locked-in people to communicate

Brain-computer interface allows locked-in people to communicate
A brain-computer interface that can decipher the thoughts of people who are unable to communicate could revolutionise the lives of those living with completely locked-in syndrome, according to a paper publishing in PLOS Biology. Counter to expectations, the participants in the study reported being "happy", despite their extreme condition. The research was conducted by a multinational team, led by Professor Niels Birbaumer, at the Wyss Center for Bio and Neuroengineering in Geneva, Switzerland.
1st February 2017


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