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Anti-myeloma agent opens for latest treatment strategy

The tumour form multiple myeloma is very challenging to treat and is still considered incurable. In a recently published study in the scientific journal Oncotarget, researchers at Uppsala University show how inhibition of the protein BMI-1 could be used as a new strategy to treat the disease. Multiple myeloma is a type of blood cancer where immune cells grow in an uncontrolled manner in the bone marrow.
30th October 2017

Mechanism behind ‘DNA scissor’ CRIPSR revealed

A research group at Uppsala University has found out how CRISPR-Cas9 – also known as ‘molecular scissors’ – can search the genome for a specific DNA sequence. Cas9 already has many applications in biotechnology and is also expected to revolutionise medicine. The new research findings show how Cas9 can be improved to make the molecular scissors faster and more reliable.
29th September 2017

Blood test reveals risk of coronary artery disease

Blood test reveals risk of coronary artery disease
  A study led by researchers at Uppsala University, which included more than 13,000 patients, has resulted in a new tool that will facilitate the treatment of patients with stable coronary artery disease.
4th September 2017


Online support helps parents of children with cancer

Online support helps parents of children with cancer
Online support can help parents of children with cancer to cope with symptoms of post-traumatic stress and depression. This finding emerges from a study by researchers at the Department of Women’s and Children’s Health at Uppsala University. Previous research has shown that a substantial proportion of parents of children being treated for cancer experience symptoms of post-traumatic stress and depression.
22nd August 2017

Pathology atlas could lead to personalised cancer treatment

Pathology atlas could lead to personalised cancer treatment
A unique pathology atlas is now being launched and made available to researchers all over the world. It maps cancer-related genes and opens up a new route towards personalised cancer treatment. The atlas project has been led by Professor Mathias Uhlén, SciLifeLab, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, in cooperation with colleagues from Uppsala University and elsewhere. The new pathology atlas is a major step forward for the dream of personalised cancer treatment.
18th August 2017

Ultrafast method determines antibiotic resistance

Ultrafast method determines antibiotic resistance
Researchers at Uppsala University have developed a new method for very rapidly determining whether infection-causing bacteria are resistant or susceptible to antibiotics. The findings have now been published in the US journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Antibiotic resistance is a growing medical problem that threatens human health globally. One important contributory factor in the development of resistance is the incorrect use of antibiotics for treatment.
9th August 2017

Project advances research on tissue bioregeneration

Project advances research on tissue bioregeneration
Traditionally, tissue regeneration research uses limited design criteria and a single goal approach. Despite regenerative medicine moving to the forefront of therapeutic strategies, the final product is frequently disappointing, meaning lengthy repetition of costly trials. The part EU-funded BIODESIGN (Rational bioactive materials design for tissue regeneration) project has completed an outcome-driven initiative with first class academic and industrial collaboration to change the tissue regeneration research arena.
19th June 2017

Tea consumption could lead to epigenetic changes in women

Tea consumption could lead to epigenetic changes in women
Epigenetic changes are chemical modifications that turn our genes off or on. In a new study from Uppsala University, researchers show that tea consumption in women leads to epigenetic changes in genes that are known to interact with cancer and estrogen metabolism. The results are published in the journal Human Molecular Genetics. It is well known that our environment and lifestyle factors, such as food choices, smoking and exposure to chemicals, can lead to epigenetic changes.
31st May 2017

Dry blood samples are alternative for cheaper healthcare

Dry blood samples are alternative for cheaper healthcare
Dried blood on filter paper stored for future diagnostic purposes – considerably easier than the present-day, resource-consuming method using frozen blood samples in plastic tubes. In a new study, Uppsala researchers have successfully measured 92 different proteins in millimetre-sized circles punched out of dried samples. They have shown that this method has great potential to save resources, to the benefit of early diagnostics and treatment.
22nd May 2017

Mislocalised calcium channel causes insulin secretion defect

Researchers from Uppsala University have studied beta cells of type-2 diabetic donors, and find that a mislocalised calcium channel contributes to the failed insulin secretion associated with the disease. After a meal, the blood sugar rises. To counteract this and to make the sugar available to the body, specialised cells in the pancreas get activated to secrete insulin. In people with diabetes this mechanism fails, which leads to elevated blood sugar and a host of other diabetes related complications.
19th May 2017

Malaria mechanism gives hope to pregnant women

Resistance to malaria drugs means that pregnant women are unable to overcome the anaemia caused by the malaria parasite – and their babies are born undersized. A study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Uppsala University however, exposes the effects of malaria in pregnant women and shows how the PTEF protein is central to the infection. The study opens the way for new malaria drugs.
9th May 2017

Research brings hope for cancer patients with kidney failure

Kidney dysfunction affects more than 50% of all cancer patients, and is directly linked to poor survival. Despite the high occurrence, it is still not clear how presence of a tumour contributes to kidney dysfunction and how this can be prevented. A new study from researchers at Uppsala University shows that kidney dysfunction can be caused by the patient’s own immune system, ‘tricked’ by the tumour to become activated.
26th April 2017

Tool suits prognosis and choice of therapy for RA

In rheumatoid arthritis, antibodies are formed that affect the inflammation in the joints. In an article published today in the journal Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, researchers at Uppsala University show that antibodies against the cartilage protein collagen II are associated with a good prognosis. “Analysing these antibodies, in combination with other relevant antibodies, could be used for predicting prognosis and choosing therapy for rheumatoid arthritis patients,” says Professor Johan Rönnelid who has led the study.
23rd March 2017

Studying genes in clusters allows for better predictions

When many genes regulate a single trait, they commonly work together in large clusters or ‘networks’. Taking this into account allows better predictions of how an individual’s genetic make-up affects the trait concerned. The risk of perceiving the importance of an individual gene incorrectly is also reduced. This has been shown by researchers at Uppsala University, through a detailed analysis of thousands of related yeast cells.
28th February 2017

Nanosensor detects DNA building blocks

Nanosensor detects DNA building blocks
Researchers at Uppsala University and in Brazil have developed a new type of nanosensor that can detect single molecules. The nanosensor, comprising a combination of two different materials, has been used to identify the different building blocks in DNA. What is really groundbreaking about this study is that it has succeeded in combining graphene, which is electrically conductive, and boron nitride, which is insulating, in the same two-dimensional material.
16th February 2017

Principle for epigenetic changes discovered

  In a study, researchers at Uppsala University have found evidence of a new principle for how epigenetic changes can occur. The principle is based on an enzyme, tryptase, that has epigenetic effects that cause cells to proliferate in an uncontrolled manner.
23rd January 2017

Mobile microscope analyses cancer tumours and infections

Mobile microscope analyses cancer tumours and infections
With the help of a microscope which is attached to a regular mobile, doctors can diagnose for example cancer tumours, infections and tuberculosis. The invention could become a weapon in the fight against antibiotic resistance. A small, simple and relatively cheap microscope which is printed using a 3D printer and coupled to the camera of a mobile phone can be used to assess tumours, bacteria, viruses and fungal cells.
19th January 2017

Antibody design opens door for brain treatments

Antibody design opens door for brain treatments
Immunotherapy has proven to be effective against many serious diseases. But to treat diseases in the brain, the antibodies must first get past the obstacle of the blood-brain barrier. In a new study, a research group at Uppsala University describes their development of a new antibody design that increases brain uptake of antibodies almost 100-fold. Immunotherapy entails treatment with antibodies; it is the fastest growing field in pharmaceutical development.
17th January 2017

3D grown tumours allow more realistic drug testing

3D grown tumours allow more realistic drug testing
Understanding how cells within tumours respond to drugs is a critical issue in anticancer drug development. In an article published in Cell Chemical Biology researchers from Uppsala University report a new approach to study cancer cells’ reactions to treatments and present how it can be used to find new promising drug combinations. Much of what we currently know about cancer, both in terms of treatment and underlying molecular mechanisms, has been learned through growing cancer cells in the laboratory.
28th October 2016

AI reveals mechanism behind brain tumour

Researchers at Uppsala University have used computer modelling to study how brain tumours arise. The study, which is published today in the journal EBioMedicine, illustrated how researchers in the future will be able to use large-scale data to find new disease mechanisms and identify treatment targets. The last ten years’ progress in molecular biology has drastically changed how cancer researchers work.
20th September 2016


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