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University of Wisconsin-Madison articles

Displaying 1 - 20 of 39

Enabling communication between cells

Enabling communication between cells
A basic structure that allows cells and subcellular units to converse in chemical language turns out to have a lot more abilities than expected. The structure, called a “fusion pore,” allows hormones, chemicals that carry nerve impulses, and proteins produced in containers inside cells to reach their destination. Without fusion pores, multicellular life is difficult to envision, says University of Wisconsin–Madison neuroscientist Edwin Chapman.
1st February 2018

Bringing accurate tuberculosis tests to Africa

Bringing accurate tuberculosis tests to Africa
Since the 1970s, millions of women have appreciated the ease of a urine-based home pregnancy test to find out if their family is about to grow. A diagnostic test that’s just as accurate and easy to use would make a big impact in the war on tuberculosis. With more than 10 million affected people worldwide, many of them in Africa, the annual market for such a test is estimated at about 75 million — but only if it costs as little as $2 apiece.
19th January 2018

Understanding the roots of CAVD

Understanding the roots of CAVD
The diminutive size of our aortic valve belies its essential role in pushing oxygen-rich blood from the heart into the aorta, our body’s largest vessel, and from there to all other organs. Yet for decades, researchers have focused less on damaged valves than on atherosclerosis, the gradual hardening of the blood vessels themselves. Thanks, in part, to pigs at the University of Wisconsin–Madison’s Arlington Agricultural Research Station, scientists are catching up on understanding the roots of CAVD.
3rd January 2018


Repair kit improves precision of CRISPR gene editing

Repair kit improves precision of CRISPR gene editing
For the past five years, CRISPR-Cas9 technology has revolutionised the field of gene editing due to its ease and low cost. But although this technology reliably finds and cuts the targeted stretch of DNA sequence, fixing that cut as desired has been something of a hit-or-miss process. Error rates as high as 50% are a particular problem when the goal is to correct typos in the DNA that cause genetic disease.
24th November 2017

Video game improves balance in children with autism

Video game improves balance in children with autism
  Playing a video game that rewards participants for holding various 'ninja' poses could help children and youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) improve their balance, according to a recent study in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders led by researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.
22nd November 2017

A recipe to make human blood-brain barrier

A recipe to make human blood-brain barrier
  A critical anatomical structure, the barrier is the brain’s first and most comprehensive line of defense. But in addition to protecting the brain, it also is involved in disease and effectively blocks many of the small-molecule drugs that might make effective therapies for a host of neurological conditions, including such things as stroke, trauma and cancer.
9th November 2017

Model reveals possibility of pumping antibiotics into bacteria

Model reveals possibility of pumping antibiotics into bacteria
Researchers in the University of Wisconsin–Madison Department of Biochemistry have discovered that a cellular pump known to move drugs like antibiotics out of E. coli bacteria has the potential to bring them in as well, opening lines of research into combating the bacteria. The discovery could rewrite almost 50 years of thinking about how these types of transporters function in the cell.
8th November 2017

Old bones lead to strategy for drug delivery

Old bones lead to strategy for drug delivery
  Taking a hint from archaeology, where centuries-old bones and teeth have been found to harbor intact biological proteins, a team of Wisconsin scientists has devised a way to deliver drugs and other therapeutic agents by coating medical devices with a nanostructured mineral sheath that mimics bone.
4th July 2017

Machine learning can help diagnose genetic disorders

Machine learning can help diagnose genetic disorders
In a new study published in Scientific Reports, the researchers used machine learning to analyse hundreds of voice recordings and accurately identify individuals with a genetic condition known as fragile X premutation, which increases the risk of developing neurodegenerative disorders, infertility or having a child with fragile X syndrome.
12th June 2017

Stem cells yield blueprint for body’s vasculature

Stem cells yield blueprint for body’s vasculature
In the average adult human, there are an estimated 100,000 miles of capillaries, veins and arteries — the plumbing that carries life-sustaining blood to every part of the body, including vital organs such as the heart and the brain. When things go wrong with vasculature, the result can be a heart attack, stroke or other life-threatening or chronic condition.
31st May 2017

Improving medical imaging and patient outcomes

Improving medical imaging and patient outcomes
Since the 1980s, GE has supported research into imaging technologies at UW–Madison. The latest agreement, a 10-year, $34-million contract, began in 2012 to fund radiology and medical physics researchers, who work on campus with the company’s newest CT, PET and MR scanners. “We have relationships globally, but UW–Madison is practically in a class of its own in those relationships,” says Jörg Debatin, vice-president, chief medical officer, and chief technology officer at GE Healthcare.
22nd May 2017

Smartphone app aimed at preventing substance abuse relapse

Smartphone app aimed at preventing substance abuse relapse
A UW–Madison research team was selected as one of seven finalists in Harvard’s Innovation in American Government competition, for its work in creating a smartphone application that helps people recover from addiction to alcohol and other substances. The app, called Addiction CHESS (A-CHESS), was created by the Center for Health Enhancement Systems Studies.
19th May 2017

Replicating the patient's blood-brain barrier in the lab dish

Replicating the patient's blood-brain barrier in the lab dish
  The blood-brain barrier is biology's proverbial double-edged sword. An impermeable shield of endothelial cells that protects our brains from toxins and other threats that may lurk in circulating blood, the barrier can also exclude therapeutic drugs and, at times, essential biomolecules required for healthy brain development.
17th May 2017

Technology aims to accelerate learning

Technology aims to accelerate learning
The adage “put your thinking caps on” might evoke visions of an elementary classroom, where a teacher has just admonished cherubic little learners about to embark on a particularly difficult academic adventure. In today’s high-stakes world, where we all need to think, learn or act quickly, the adage still rings true: Mastering a new task, skill or information often takes the right environment, mindset, sharp focus and lots of hard work, repetition and time.
27th April 2017

Introducing infection-detection tech into hospital ICUs

Introducing infection-detection tech into hospital ICUs
In the face of growing crises related to antibiotic resistance and hospital-acquired infections, a UW–Madison spinoff called Isomark is working to introduce a new infection-detection technology into hospital intensive care units. Isomark’s system measures carbon isotopes in exhaled breath. Without even touching the patient, it can offer the earliest warning of severe bacterial infection, says founder Mark Cook, a professor of animal science at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.
25th April 2017

Digital inhaler add-on offers slick aid to asthma care

Digital inhaler add-on offers slick aid to asthma care
  What do you get by marrying an asthma inhaler to a wireless monitor and a smartphone app? Plenty, says David Van Sickle, a medical anthropologist who specialises in respiratory disease. In 2011, Van Sickle created a spinoff called Propeller Health while he was working on respiratory disease prevention at UW Health in Madison.
20th April 2017

Experiment yields clue to devastating neurological disease

Experiment yields clue to devastating neurological disease
  After a 29-year quest, Ian Duncan, a professor of veterinary medicine at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, has finally pinpointed the cause of a serious neurologic disease in a colony of rats. His new study, now online in the journal Annals of Neurology, is more than the conclusion of a personal and intellectual odyssey, however.
20th April 2017

Text-mining tool turbocharges biomedical pursuits

Text-mining tool turbocharges biomedical pursuits
With about 100 lines of code, a Morgridge Institute for Research team has unleashed a fast, simple and predictive text-mining tool that may turbocharge big biomedical pursuits such as drug repurposing and stem cell treatments. The algorithm, named “KinderMiner” by its inventors, has been put to use exploring one of the largest single archives of research journal papers, Europe PubMed Central.
30th March 2017

Engineer aims to grow spinal tissue in lab

Engineer aims to grow spinal tissue in lab
For a soldier who suffered a spinal cord injury on the battlefield, the promise of regenerative medicine is to fully repair the resulting limb paralysis. But that hope is still years from reality. Not only powerful, but efficient. Studying diseases in lab-created tissue may help reduce the price tag — now roughly $1.8 billion — for bringing a new drug to market, which is one of the reasons Ashton received a National Science Foundation CAREER Award for advancing tissue engineering of the human spinal cord.
22nd March 2017

Plant-based 3D scaffolds can create biomedical implants

Plant-based 3D scaffolds can create biomedical implants
  Borrowing from nature is an age-old theme in science. Form and function go hand-in-hand in the natural world and the structures created by plants and animals are only rarely improved on by humans.
21st March 2017


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