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Technische Universität München articles

Displaying 1 - 20 of 35

Staining method enables Nano-CT imaging of tissue samples

Staining method enables Nano-CT imaging of tissue samples
To date, examining patient tissue samples has meant cutting them into thin slices for histological analysis. This might now be set to change – thanks to a new staining method devised by an interdisciplinary team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM). This allows specialists to investigate three-dimensional tissue samples using the Nano-CT system also recently developed at TUM.
22nd February 2018

The formation of myelin sheaths around nerve fibres

The formation of myelin sheaths around nerve fibres
Nerve fibres are surrounded by a myelin sheath. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now made the first-ever 'live' observations of how this protective layer is formed. The team discovered that the characteristic patterns of the myelin layer are determined at an early stage. However, these patterns can be adjusted as needed in a process apparently controlled by the nerve cells themselves.
14th February 2018

Double strike against tuberculosis

Double strike against tuberculosis
In search of new strategies against life-threatening tuberculosis infections, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), as well as Harvard University and Texas A&M University in the USA have found a new ally. They discovered a substance that interferes with the mycomembrane formation of the bacterium. It is effective even in low concentrations and when combined with known antibiotics their effectiveness is improved by up to 100-fold.
2nd January 2018


Building virus-sized structures through mass production

Building virus-sized structures through mass production
It is the double strands of our genes that make them so strong. Using a technique known as DNA origami, biophysicist Hendrik Dietz has been building nanometer-scale objects for several years at the Technical University of Munich (TUM). Now Dietz and his team have not only broken out of the nanometer realm to build larger objects, but have also cut the production costs a thousand-fold. These innovations open a whole new frontier for the technology.
8th December 2017

Study examines the interaction of human cancer inhibitors

Study examines the interaction of human cancer inhibitors
Medications which block enzymes belonging to the kinase family, are among the most effective pharmaceuticals for targeted cancer therapies. Scientists at the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have examined 243 kinase inhibitors which are either approved drugs or have been tested in clinical trials. According to results published in Science, some of these may have more applications than previously thought.
5th December 2017

Sensor measures calcium concentrations deep inside tissue

Sensor measures calcium concentrations deep inside tissue
Key processes in the body are controlled by the concentration of calcium in and around cells. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed the first sensor molecule that is able to visualise calcium in living animals with the help of a radiation-free imaging technique known as optoacoustics. The method does not require the cells to be genetically modified and involves no radiation exposure.
5th December 2017

Proteome of the human heart mapped for the first time

Proteome of the human heart mapped for the first time
A healthy heart beats about two billion times during a lifetime – thanks to the interplay of more than 10,000 proteins. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) and the German Heart Centre at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now determined which and how many individual proteins are present in each type of cell that occurs in the heart. In doing so, they compiled the first atlas of the healthy human heart, known as the cardiac proteome.
14th November 2017

Nano-CT device successfully tested

Nano-CT device successfully tested
Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht the researchers analysed the locomotory system of a velvet worm.
7th November 2017

How can obesity cause breast cancer

How can obesity cause breast cancer
Obesity leads to the release of cytokines into the bloodstream which impact the metabolism of breast cancer cells, making them more aggressive as a result. Scientists from Technical University of Munich (TUM), Helmholtz Zentrum München, and Heidelberg University Hospital report on this in Cell Metabolism. The team has already been able to halt this mechanism with an antibody treatment.
20th October 2017

Heart valves formed from patient’s own tissue

Heart valves formed from patient’s own tissue
A new method allows surgeons to reconstruct entire heart valves from the patient’s own tissue. This surgical procedure is currently only used at a handful of centres in the world. Recently, PD Dr. Markus Krane, Deputy Director of the Cardiovascular Surgery Department of the German Heart Centre Munich, has also used the new method on patients in Munich. The method is particularly advantageous for children and young patients.
29th September 2017

TranslaTUM: Technology meets Medicine

TranslaTUM: Technology meets Medicine
They have different scientific backgrounds and specialist research fields but are pursuing a common goal: Leading researchers from the worlds of medicine, engineering and the natural sciences will be working under the umbrella of the new Central Institute for Translational Cancer Research (TranslaTUM) of the Technical University of Munich on cutting-edge methods in diagnostics and treatment for cancer patients. The interdisciplinary research building was opened on Thursday, September 14, 2017.
15th September 2017

Determining motor deficits precisely following a stroke

Determining motor deficits precisely following a stroke
  After a stroke, many people are unable to successfully perform basic hand movements in everyday life. The reason are symptoms of hemiparesis resulting from damage to the brain. These very frequently affect fine motor skills. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) is now paving the way to better diagnosis and more targeted therapy.
11th September 2017

Bioengineered livers similar to natural development

Bioengineered livers similar to natural development
How do cells work together and use their genome to develop into human liver tissue? An international research team from the Max Planck Institute, headed by Prof. Barbara Treutlein from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), has applied this question by using novel technologies of genomics and stem cell research. This new research greatly advances efforts to bioengineer healthy and usable human liver tissue from human pluripotent stem cells.
4th September 2017

Blood test predicts prostate tumour resistance

Blood test predicts prostate tumour resistance
When bacteria develop antibiotic resistance, treatment with these medications becomes ineffective. Similarly, tumour cells can also change in such a way that renders them resistant to particular medications. This makes it vitally important for cancer patients and their doctors to determine as early as possible whether a specific therapy is working or not. A new blood test developed by researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) can predict drug resistance in patients with advanced prostate cancer.
22nd August 2017

Helping sportspeople produce optimum results

Golfers wanting to shoot below par or tennis players looking to smash their way past opponents should focus on their backswing in order to perfect new techniques quickly, research suggests. Academics at the University of Plymouth and the Technical University of Munich assessed the speed at which people learned the basic skills which allowed them to achieve consistent results.
15th August 2017

Optimising immunisation with T cell receptors

Optimising immunisation with T cell receptors
When T cells encounter an antigen, they proliferate and produce various types of daughter cells. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now refuted the prevailing hypothesis that this immune response is largely predetermined by the individual structure of the T cell receptor. Instead, the influence of the T cell receptor can be described only in probabilistic terms. Such mathematical models may help to improve the design of future vaccination strategies.
1st August 2017

Porcine gastric molecule creates coating for contact lenses

Porcine gastric molecule creates coating for contact lenses
After a long day of working at the computer, scratchy contact lenses are not only painful, over longer periods of time they can also damage ocular tissue. Relief may be in sight from a natural mucus component referred to as a mucin. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now succeeded in demonstrating that contact lenses coated with purified porcine gastric mucin do not cause damage to the eye anymore.
1st August 2017

Substance improves brain function and fights dementia

Substance improves brain function and fights dementia
The protein amyloid beta is believed to be the major cause of Alzheimer’s disease. Substances that reduce the production of amyloid beta, such as BACE inhibitors, are therefore promising candidates for new drug treatments. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has recently demonstrated that one such BACE inhibitor reduces the amount of amyloid beta in the brain. By doing so, it can restore the normal function of nerve cells and significantly improve memory performance.
28th July 2017

TUM leads major project in digital medicine

TUM leads major project in digital medicine
  The aim of the DIFUTURE (Data Integration for Future Medicine) project is to collate and analyse digital patient data with a view to improving our understanding of diseases and allowing doctors to reach the individual right decisions faster.
14th July 2017

Antibody against carcinogenic substance deciphered

Antibody against carcinogenic substance deciphered
A team led by Prof. Arne Skerra from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has deciphered the binding mechanism of an antibody to benzopyrene — a discovery that could pave the way for an easier method to identify and, hence, remove the toxin. During the incomplete combustion of organic substances polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are created. The most well-known of these substances is benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) due to its high toxicity and its facile identification.
12th July 2017


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