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Stanford articles

Displaying 1 - 20 of 49

Taking artificial skin to the next level

Taking artificial skin to the next level
Of the many ways that humans make sense of our world – with our eyes, ears, nose and mouth – none is perhaps less appreciated than our tactile and versatile hands. Thanks to our sensitive fingertips, we can feel the heat before we touch the flame, or sense the softness of a newborn’s cheek. But people with prosthetic limbs live in a world without touch.
20th February 2018

Cancer vaccine eliminates tumours in mice

Cancer vaccine eliminates tumours in mice
Injecting minute amounts of two immune-stimulating agents directly into solid tumours in mice can eliminate all traces of cancer in the animals, including distant, untreated metastases, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The approach works for many different types of cancers, including those that arise spontaneously, the study found.
2nd February 2018

Clinical trial shows benefits of acute-stroke therapy

Clinical trial shows benefits of acute-stroke therapy
A 38-center clinical trial sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine has shown that far more people than previously thought can benefit from an emergency procedure for acute ischemic stroke. The improved outcomes were achieved through the use of brain-imaging software developed at Stanford.
25th January 2018


A hassle-free HIV test that works better and sooner

A hassle-free HIV test that works better and sooner
  Public health officials have a tough choice to make when it comes to screening people for HIV: administer a reliable blood test that can detect infections early on, but that few people will volunteer for, or give people a convenient test using saliva that is less reliable during the first stages of infection. A new test could change that.
23rd January 2018

Antibiotics can benefit from latest type of cellulose

Antibiotics can benefit from latest type of cellulose
Produced by plants, algae and some bacteria, cellulose is an abundant molecule involved in the production of hundreds of products, from paper to fabrics to renewable building materials. It’s also one starting material for producing ethanol, a common fuel additive and renewable fuel source. Now, Stanford scientists have found a new type of cellulose in bacteria with properties that could make it an improvement over traditional cellulose for fuels and other materials, or for better understanding and treating bacterial infections.
22nd January 2018

Cooling glove helps athletes and patients

Cooling glove helps athletes and patients
A cooling device that has been improving strength and endurance in mostly male athletes for 15 years is finding new uses in helping people with multiple sclerosis live normal lives, preventing overheating in Ebola workers and cooling working dogs. In a recent trial in women, it helped frosh participants perform hundreds of pushups in an hour. The idea itself isn’t new. The mitten-like device is designed and built to draw heat out of the body’s core and has been shown to radically improve both strength and endurance.
2nd January 2018

Algorithm can diagnose pneumonia better than radiologists

Algorithm can diagnose pneumonia better than radiologists
Stanford researchers have developed an algorithm that offers diagnoses based off chest X-ray images. It can diagnose up to 14 types of medical conditions and is able to diagnose pneumonia better than expert radiologists working alone. A paper about the algorithm, called CheXNet, was published on the open-access, scientific preprint website arXiv.
16th November 2017

Technology relates brain circuits to alertness

Technology relates brain circuits to alertness
Stanford researchers have for the first time tied several brain circuits to alertness. The findings enhance scientists' understanding of the forces driving alertness, a brain state that's essential to survival, by showing that diverse cell types throughout the brain together produce this state. Problems tied to alertness deficits range from sleep deprivation to depression to brain-trauma-induced somnolence, while conditions such as anxiety, mania and post-traumatic stress disorder are often characterised by excessive alertness.
3rd November 2017

Gel improves growth of neural stem cells in large quantities

Gel improves growth of neural stem cells in large quantities
In a recent paper in Nature Materials, Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering Sarah Heilshorn described a solution to the dual challenges of growing and preserving neural stem cells in a state where they are still able to mature into many different cell types. The first challenge is that growing stem cells in quantity requires space. Like traditional farming, it is a two-dimensional affair. If you want more wheat, corn or stem cells, you need more surface area.
2nd November 2017

Rare disease results in a new way to attack cancer

Rare disease results in a new way to attack cancer
Some of the most promising new treatments for blood cancers, drugs called proteasome inhibitors, have a problem: For reasons that researchers are still working to fully understand, cancer cells can build up a resistance to them. Now, researchers report in ACS Central Science how an investigation into a rare disease known as NGLY1 deficiency has revealed a way to outmaneuver one possible resistance mechanism.
25th October 2017

Brain-machine interfaces treat neurological disease

Brain-machine interfaces treat neurological disease
Since the 19th century at least, humans have wondered what could be accomplished by linking our brains – smart and flexible but prone to disease and disarray – directly to technology in all its cold, hard precision. Writers of the time dreamed up intelligence enhanced by implanted clockwork and a starship controlled by a transplanted brain. While these remain inconceivably far-fetched, the melding of brains and machines for treating disease and improving human health is now a reality.
18th October 2017

Mutation can supercharge tumour-suppressor

Mutation can supercharge tumour-suppressor
Cancer researchers have long hailed p53, a tumour-suppressor protein, for its ability to keep unruly cells from forming tumours. But for such a highly studied protein, p53 has hidden its tactics well. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have tapped into what makes p53 tick, delineating a clear pathway that shows how the protein mediates anti-tumor activity in pancreatic cancer.
18th October 2017

Stanford psychologists simplify brain-imaging data

Stanford psychologists simplify brain-imaging data
Neuroscience research has made incredible strides toward revealing the inner workings of our brains thanks in part to technological advances, but barriers in sharing and accessing that data stymie progress in the field. Stanford psychologists are addressing those barriers through a new way of organising brain-imaging data that simplifies data analysis and helps researchers collaborate more effectively – they call it BIDS (Brain Imaging Data Structure).
2nd October 2017

VR helps study origins of fear and anxiety

VR helps study origins of fear and anxiety
Our irrational fears are both very real and are also figments of our imagination. By manipulating what we think of as reality, researchers at Stanford University are working to understand the source of our anxieties and how to alleviate them. In order to do so, they built a virtual reality chamber where one’s fears can be generated by a computer. In 1984, the book, this was done in a special room as well, but with real objects of fear and for opposite reasons.
11th September 2017

Models help doctors manage movement disorders

Models help doctors manage movement disorders
Computer-generated skeletons are competing in a virtual race, running, hopping and jumping as far as they can before collapsing in an electronic heap. Meanwhile, in the real world, their coaches – teams of machine learning and artificial intelligence enthusiasts – are competing to see who can best train their skeletons to mimic those complex human movements. The event’s creator has a serious end goal: making life better for kids with cerebral palsy.
7th August 2017

VR system helps surgeons and reassures patients

VR system helps surgeons and reassures patients
Having undergone two aneurysm surgeries, Sandi Rodoni thought she understood everything about the procedure. But when it came time for her third surgery, the Watsonville, California, resident was treated to a virtual reality trip inside her own brain. Stanford Medicine is using a new software system that combines imaging from MRIs, CT scans and angiograms to create a 3D model that physicians and patients can see and manipulate — just like a virtual reality game.
13th July 2017

Algorithm diagnoses heart arrhythmias with high accuracy

Algorithm diagnoses heart arrhythmias with high accuracy
A new algorithm developed by Stanford computer scientists can sift through hours of heart rhythm data generated by some wearable monitors to find sometimes life-threatening irregular heartbeats, called arrhythmias. The algorithm, detailed in an arXiv paper, performs better than trained cardiologists, and has the added benefit of being able to sort through data from remote locations where people don’t have routine access to cardiologists.
7th July 2017

Radiation-exposed corals may hold insights on cancer

Radiation-exposed corals may hold insights on cancer
More than 70 years after the U.S. tested atomic bombs on a ring of sand in the Pacific Ocean called Bikini Atoll, Stanford researchers are studying how long-term radiation exposure there has affected corals that normally grow for centuries without developing cancer. The researchers’ work is featured in an episode of “Big Pacific,” a five-week PBS series about species, natural phenomena and behaviors of the Pacific Ocean.
28th June 2017

Cellular 'guillotine' helps understand how single cells heal

Cellular 'guillotine' helps understand how single cells heal
While doing research at the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts, Sindy Tang learned of a remarkable organism: Stentor coeruleus. It’s a single-celled, free-living freshwater organism, shaped like a trumpet and big enough to see with the naked eye. And, to Tang’s amazement, if cut in half it can heal itself into two healthy cells. Tang, who is an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford University, knew right away that she had to study this incredible ability.
27th June 2017

Photosynthesis could help damaged hearts

Photosynthesis could help damaged hearts
In the ongoing hunt to find better treatments for heart disease, the top cause of death globally, new research from Stanford shows promising results using an unusual strategy: photosynthetic bacteria and light. Researchers found that by injecting a type of bacteria into the hearts of anaesthestised rats with cardiac disease, then using light to trigger photosynthesis, they were able to increase the flow of oxygen and improve heart function, according to a study published in Science Advances.
16th June 2017


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