Kyoto University

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Kyoto University articles

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Turbulence enhances the production of platelets

Turbulence enhances the production of platelets
Platelets are the cells that stop bleeding and are regularly needed to treat patients suffering from various diseases or undergoing surgery. In a new study seen in Cell, CiRA researchers show that turbulence can significantly increase platelet numbers. Using this new information, they report a bioreactor that produces enough platelets from iPS cells that may be able to replace donor blood and be used to treat patients.
26th July 2018

'Body-on-a-chip' helps discover side effects of drugs

'Body-on-a-chip' helps discover side effects of drugs
Researchers at Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) in Japan have designed a small 'body-on-a-chip' device that can test the side effects of drugs s on human cells. The device solves some issues with current, similar microfluidic devices and offers promise for the next generation of pre-clinical drug tests. The Integrated Heart/Cancer on a Chip (iHCC) was used to test the toxicity of the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin on heart cells.
29th August 2017

A nanofibre matrix for healing

A nanofibre matrix for healing
A matrix made of gelatin nanofibers on a synthetic polymer microfiber mesh may provide a better way to culture large quantities of healthy human stem cells. Developed by a team of researchers led by Ken-ichiro Kamei of Kyoto University’s Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), the ‘fibre-on-fibre’ (FF) matrix improves on currently available stem cell culturing techniques.
16th March 2017


Heartbeats could be measured wirelessly

Heartbeats could be measured wirelessly
A group of researchers at Kyoto University have developed a technique that measures heartbeats wirelessly. The technology works in real time and, the researchers claim, is as accurate as an electrocardiograph. The sensors work by using millimeter-wave spread-spectrum radar technology and a signal analysis algorithm that identifies signals from the body.
21st January 2016


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