KTH Royal Institute of Technology

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KTH Royal Institute of Technology articles

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Enabling simulations of large parts of the brain

Enabling simulations of large parts of the brain
Brain activity simulations are a critical part of neuroscience research, but advances in this type of computing have been held back by the same thing that frustrates pretty much anything you use a computer for – namely, memory. The future of supercomputing promises immense resources for technologies such as the neuronal network simulator, NEST. The challenge today is to work out how to make optimal use of these resources.
9th March 2018

Model could lead to treatments for Alzheimer’s

Model could lead to treatments for Alzheimer’s
A protocol developed in Sweden has the potential for industrial-scale production of the brain helper cells known as astrocytes. The research team's work could help medical science develop treatments for such diseases as Alzheimer’s. Star shaped cells that are found in the brain and spine, astrocytes were long thought to be the 'glue' that binds nerve cells; but recent advances show that they are much more.
16th February 2018

Technique produces DNA wire biosensors

Technique produces DNA wire biosensors
  KTH researchers reported a nanoengineering innovation that offers hope for treatment of cancer, infections and other health problems – conductive wires of DNA enhanced with gold which could be used to electrically measure hundreds of biological processes simultaneously.
12th February 2018


Nanomaterials may help to kill specific cancer cells

Nanomaterials may help to kill specific cancer cells
Researchers from KTH have succeeded in taking the next step toward using man-made nanoscale compounds in the fight against cancer. A recent proof-of-concept study showed that dendrimers – which were first introduced in the 1980s – may be used to introduce compounds that essentially trick cancer cells into performing self-destructive tasks. Dendrimers – or cascade molecules – are organically synthesised large molecules that match nature's peptides and proteins with respect to size and structure.
14th December 2017

Forming a bioactive spider silk for medical use

Forming a bioactive spider silk for medical use
  With recent advances, technology can be used to synthesise silk with similar mechanical properties as an actual spider’s. But applying this material to promising medical therapies for illnesses such as cancer requires that humans develop a capability that only arachnids or silkworms possess – the ability to control the formation of silk.
5th December 2017

Is our cancer research down a 20-year dead-end path?

Is our cancer research down a 20-year dead-end path?
For nearly two decades researchers have sought a way to target an estrogen receptor in the hope they could improve breast cancer survival, but an article published in Nature Communications contends that the effort may never pan out. The reason? The target receptor does not actually appear to be where they believe it to be. The study questions whether reliance on insufficiently-validated antibodies has led science down a dead-end path since the discovery of estrogen receptor beta (ESR2) in the 1990s.
16th June 2017

Cell Atlas study reveals insights into human biology

Cell Atlas study reveals insights into human biology
The first analysis of the physical arrangement of proteins in cells was published in Science, revealing that a large portion of human proteins can be found in more than one location in a given cell. Using the Sweden-based Cell Atlas, researchers examined the spatial distribution of the human proteome that correspond to the majority of protein-coding genes, and they described in unprecedented detail the distribution of proteins to the various organelles and substructures of the human body’s smallest unit, the cell.
12th May 2017

Flu test is easy as breathing and presents faster results

Flu test is easy as breathing and presents faster results
A method for diagnosing flu virus from breath samples could soon replace invasive nasal swabs and deliver better results faster. There’s a short window for detecting influenza virus, because as the infection takes hold – the concentration of the virus lessens. So if the patient isn’t tested soon after exposure, conventional methods run the risk of a giving a false negative result.
29th March 2017

Heart’s hydraulics proven for the first time

While scientists agree that the heart relies on hydraulic forces to fill up with blood, for whatever reason these forces have never been measured – that is, until now. New research published in Scientific Reports shows for the first time how much the heart relies on a hydraulic mechanism for diastole – or the transfer of blood from its smaller chambers, the atria, to fill up its larger ones, the ventricles.
3rd March 2017

Treatment attacks liver disease and type 2 diabetes

Treatment attacks liver disease and type 2 diabetes
Researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology are planning the clinical trial of a new treatment for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes which harnesses liver cells’ own ability to burn accumulated fats. In a study involving 86 people with varying degrees of fatty liver disease, researchers from KTH Science for Life Laboratory(SciLifeLab) research center and Gothenburg University found that the liver has the ability to burn up accumulated fats.
3rd March 2017

Skin patch with microneedles could replace injections

Skin patch with microneedles could replace injections
It’s only a matter of time before drugs are administered via patches with painless microneedles instead of unpleasant injections. But designers need to balance the need for flexible, comfortable-to-wear material with effective microneedle penetration of the skin. Researchers from KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm say they may have cracked the problem.
13th December 2016

Probe offers accurate detection of biomarker for cancer

Probe offers accurate detection of biomarker for cancer
A technique offers better sensitivity and accuracy in detecting an essential biomarker of cancer and inflammatory diseases. Hypochlorous acid HOCl is one of the reactive molecules that our immune system dispatches to attack invading pathogens or potentially harmful irritants. The oxidant is also generated as a result of tissue damage that causes – or even exacerbates – inflammatory diseases such as lung and liver disease, heart attacks, atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative disorder.
8th December 2016

Researchers target tenfold increase in X-ray resolution

Researchers target tenfold increase in X-ray resolution
For all of its benefit to society, the technology we use for medical imaging is nevertheless flawed. Relevant little details go undetected due to limitations in resolution. But a recent investment in research at KTH aims to improve the picture – by at least 10 times. There are today several ways to explore how our bodies look inside. Computerised tomography (CT) and X-ray are two of the most widely-known techniques.
31st October 2016

Low cost method for examining single leukemia cells

Leukemia is a disease in which each cell can exhibit different genetic traits, and now KTH researchers have found a cheap way to examine individual leukemia cells. Reported in Nature Communications, the breakthrough could transform leukemia treatment. Cells are packed with genetic information that can be used to improve treatment of diseases such as cancer, but the RNA sequencing methods typically used today have one limitation: they don’t identify in which cells the genetic activity is taking place.
17th October 2016

Material enables more reliable self-screening

Material enables more reliable self-screening
Paper-based diagnostics enable rapid medical test results at minimal cost, and now they can get even better. A synthetic paper developed by Swedish researchers could enable simultaneous screenings for multiple conditions, with more reliable results. Microscopic image of the synthetic paper developed at KTH. Developed at KTH, the synthetic paper differs significantly from the most predominant paper diagnostics used today, such as pregnancy tests.
25th February 2016


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