Bioengineering

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Radiopaque glue seals bleeding and guides surgery

As open surgery has gradually been replaced by minimally-invasive and image-guided procedures, tissue adhesives are taking the place of sutures and surgical staples. With countless applications, including: bleeding embolisation, angioplasty, stent insertion, and biopsy, among others, new surgical glues are highly desired in medical clinics.
20th July 2017

Silicone heart beats almost like a human heart

Silicone heart beats almost like a human heart
  ETH researchers from the Functional Materials Laboratory have developed a silicone heart that beats almost like a human heart. In collaboration with colleagues from the Product Development Group Zurich, they have tested how well it works.
13th July 2017

Transparent heart tissue reveals hidden complexity

Transparent heart tissue reveals hidden complexity
A technique borrowed from neuroscience to see through brain tissue is helping scientists to see the fine structure of the heart. Using an existing approach, a team from Imperial has been able to turn samples of heart tissue transparent, revealing the complex networks of tiny blood vessels which supply the tissue as well as the scaffold of collagen which holds everything in place.
12th July 2017


A necessary step on road to 3D bioprinting

A necessary step on road to 3D bioprinting
  In their work toward 3D printing transplantable tissues and organs, bioengineers and scientists from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have demonstrated a key step on the path to generate implantable tissues with functioning capillaries.
12th July 2017

Engineering digestive system tissues in the lab

Engineering digestive system tissues in the lab
  Researchers at Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine have reached important milestones in their quest to engineer replacement tissue in the lab to treat digestive system conditions - from infants born with too-short bowels to adults with inflammatory bowel disease, colon cancer, or fecal incontinence.
5th July 2017

Artificial bile ducts developed in lab

Artificial bile ducts developed in lab
Cambridge scientists have developed a new method for growing and transplanting artificial bile ducts that could in future be used to help treat liver disease in children, reducing the need for liver transplantation. In research published in the journal Nature Medicine, the researchers grew 3D cellular structure which, once transplanted into mice, developed into normal, functioning bile ducts.
4th July 2017

Pluripotent stem cells generate lab grown human colons

Pluripotent stem cells generate lab grown human colons
Scientists used human pluripotent stem cells to generate human embryonic colons in a laboratory that function much like natural human tissues when transplanted into mice, according to research published in Cell Stem Cell. The study is believed to be the first time human colon organoids have been successfully tissue engineered in this manner, according to researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center who led the project.
23rd June 2017

Can PCU improve valve function?

Can PCU improve valve function?
Pulsed cavitation ultrasound (PCU) can be used to remotely soften human degenerative calcified biosprosthetic valves and may significantly improve the valve opening function, according to a study published in JACC: Basic to Translational Science. Olivier Villemain, MD, et al., examined the effects of PCU on human bioprosthetic heart valves that were removed from patients because they were heavily calcified and were non-functional.
20th June 2017

Project advances research on tissue bioregeneration

Project advances research on tissue bioregeneration
Traditionally, tissue regeneration research uses limited design criteria and a single goal approach. Despite regenerative medicine moving to the forefront of therapeutic strategies, the final product is frequently disappointing, meaning lengthy repetition of costly trials. The part EU-funded BIODESIGN (Rational bioactive materials design for tissue regeneration) project has completed an outcome-driven initiative with first class academic and industrial collaboration to change the tissue regeneration research arena.
19th June 2017

Silk fibres help to mend broken bones

Silk fibres help to mend broken bones
Silk is an unlikely substitute for steel in any context, but for bone fractures, it may just be the perfect thing. A Swinburne researcher has developed a mix of cocoon silk fibres and biodegradable polymers that may one day hold bones together and help heal them from the inside out. Steel plates and bolts are often a surgeon's only tools for fixing fractured bones. The problem is that steel can block new bone cells from repairing the fracture. Removing the steel through further surgery can leave bones brittle.
16th June 2017


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Building IoT products for smart healthcare market
8th February 2018
United Kingdom Cocoon Networks, London
Medical Japan 2018
21st February 2018
Japan INTEX Osaka
Med-Tech Innovation Expo 2018
25th April 2018
United Kingdom Ricoh Arena, Coventry