Bioengineering

Displaying 1 - 10 of 199

Printing technique recreates biological structures

Printing technique recreates biological structures
Researchers from Queen Mary University of London have developed a printing technique using cells and molecules normally found in natural tissues to create constructs that resemble biological structures. These structures are embedded in an ink which is similar to their native environment and opens the possibility to make them behave as they would in the body.
21st February 2018

Deep-brain exploration with nanomaterial

Deep-brain exploration with nanomaterial
You can’t peer very far down into a well or below the surface of the ocean before things go dark—light does not penetrate to such depths. Though the brain is far from bottomless, neuroscientists face the same lack of light when they try to study living deep-brain structures. This is especially frustrating given that optogenetics, a method for manipulating genetically tagged brain cells with light, has exploded in popularity over the past decade.
20th February 2018

Taking artificial skin to the next level

Taking artificial skin to the next level
Of the many ways that humans make sense of our world – with our eyes, ears, nose and mouth – none is perhaps less appreciated than our tactile and versatile hands. Thanks to our sensitive fingertips, we can feel the heat before we touch the flame, or sense the softness of a newborn’s cheek. But people with prosthetic limbs live in a world without touch.
20th February 2018


Injectable nanomaterials for sustained delivery of drugs

Injectable nanomaterials for sustained delivery of drugs
Because they can be programmed to travel the body and selectively target cancer and other sites of disease, nanometer-scale vehicles called nanocarriers can deliver higher concentrations of drugs to bombard specific areas of the body while minimising systemic side effects. Nanocarriers can also deliver drugs and diagnostic agents that are typically not soluble in water or blood as well as significantly decrease the effective dosage.
15th February 2018

Scientists develop functioning kidney tissue

Scientists develop functioning kidney tissue
Scientists have successfully produced human kidney tissue within a living organism which is able to produce urine, a first for medical science. The study led by Professors Sue Kimber and Adrian Woolf from The University of Manchester, signifies a significant milestone in the development of treatment for kidney disease. The Medical Research Council and Kidney Research UK funded project is published in the journal Stem Cell Reports.
12th February 2018

Malleable 'electronic skin' is self-healable and recyclable

Malleable 'electronic skin' is self-healable and recyclable
  CU Boulder researchers have developed a type of malleable, self-healing and fully recyclable 'electronic skin' that has applications ranging from robotics and prosthetic development to better biomedical devices. Electronic skin, known as e-skin, is a thin, translucent material that can mimic the function and mechanical properties of human skin.
12th February 2018

Technique produces DNA wire biosensors

Technique produces DNA wire biosensors
  KTH researchers reported a nanoengineering innovation that offers hope for treatment of cancer, infections and other health problems – conductive wires of DNA enhanced with gold which could be used to electrically measure hundreds of biological processes simultaneously.
12th February 2018

Edible QR code can be the medicine of the future

Edible QR code can be the medicine of the future
Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have developed a new method for the production of medicine. They print medical drugs in QR coded patterns onto an edible material. The production can be tailored to fit each patient and has the potential to protect against wrong medication and fake medicine according to the researchers. For the last 100 years, researchers have constantly pushed the boundaries for our knowledge about medicine and how different bodies can respond differently to it.
7th February 2018

3D printing living cells into biomedical objects

3D printing living cells into biomedical objects
Using a new technique they call ‘in-air microfluidics’, University of Twente scientists succeed in printing 3D structures with living cells. This special technique enable the fast and ‘on-the-fly’ production of micro building blocks that are viable and can be used for repairing damaged tissue, for example. The work is presented in Science Advances. Microfluidics is all about manipulating tiny drops of fluid with sizes between a micrometer and a millimeter.
7th February 2018

Tiny scales could help reinforce bones and joints

Tiny scales could help reinforce bones and joints
Scales are the material of choice for animals from pangolins to fish: They’re customisable, water-friendly, strong but flexible, and easy to fix when damaged. Scientists would like to recreate this unique structure—they can imagine uses from medical implants to flexible electronics—but it’s proved difficult using non-organic materials. But researchers with the University of Chicago have published a concept to use a naturally occurring mineral called calcite to “grow” scales that can attach to soft materials.
1st February 2018


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