Bioengineering

Displaying 1 - 10 of 188

Growing patient-specific T cells could aid immunotherapies

Growing patient-specific T cells could aid immunotherapies
Immunologists and oncologists are harnessing the body’s immune system to fight cancers and other diseases with adoptive cell transfer techniques. In a normal immune response, a type of white blood cell known as T cells are instructed by another kind of immune cell called an antigen-presenting cell (APC) to expand their numbers and stay alive.
17th January 2018

Next-gen flexible robots are as strong as biological muscles

Next-gen flexible robots are as strong as biological muscles
In the basement of the Engineering Center at CU Boulder, a group of researchers is working to create the next generation of robots. But instead of the metallic droids you may be imagining, these robots are made from soft materials that react to applied voltage with a wide range of motions. Such soft robots contain tremendous potential for future applications as they adapt to dynamic environments and are well-suited to closely interact with humans.
17th January 2018

Stem cells enable the sense of touch

Stem cells enable the sense of touch
Researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have, for the first time, coaxed human stem cells to become sensory interneurons — the cells that give us our sense of touch. The new protocol could be a step toward stem cell–based therapies to restore sensation in paralysed people who have lost feeling in parts of their body.
15th January 2018


Grasshoppers inspire health-monitoring electrode

Grasshoppers inspire health-monitoring electrode
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a new type of health-monitoring electrode that exhibits optimum adhesion to skin and can record high quality signals. Two young spin-off founders want to turn it into a marketable product as early as this year. Anyone who has ever had an electrocardiogram – for example, to check their heart fitness – will be familiar with the electrodes that the doctor attaches to the chest.
15th January 2018

Lab-grown kidney helps test alternative drugs

Lab-grown kidney helps test alternative drugs
Drug use is extensive in the intensive care units of many hospitals, and although lifesaving, the practice is fraught with complexity. One notable complication is kidney toxicity, which develops more readily in ICU patients because of the underlying health conditions that enhance risk. The problem affects two out of three patients, according to a study on ICU drug use by Kidney International.
11th January 2018

Induced pluripotent stem cells grow functioning human muscle

Induced pluripotent stem cells grow functioning human muscle
  Biomedical engineers have grown the first functioning human skeletal muscle from induced pluripotent stem cells. The advance builds on work published in 2015 when researchers at Duke University grew the first functioning human muscle tissue from cells obtained from muscle biopsies.
9th January 2018

Artificial bacteria reflect signals for ultrasound imaging

Artificial bacteria reflect signals for ultrasound imaging
In the 1966 science fiction film Fantastic Voyage, a submarine is shrunken down and injected into a scientist's body to repair a blood clot in his brain. While the movie may be still be fiction, researchers at Caltech are making strides in this direction: they have, for the first time, created bacterial cells with the ability to reflect sound waves from inside bodies, reminiscent of how submarines reflect sonar to reveal their locations.
4th January 2018

Spider's web inspires removable implant for managing type 1 diabetes

Spider's web inspires removable implant for managing type 1 diabetes
  For the more than 1 million Americans who live with type 1 diabetes, daily insulin injections are literally a matter of life and death. And while there is no cure, a Cornell University-led research team has developed a device that could revolutionise management of the disease.
3rd January 2018

May the Force be with you

May the Force be with you
Luke Skywalker’s bionic hand is a step closer to reality for amputees in this galaxy. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have created an ultrasonic sensor that allows amputees to control each of their prosthetic fingers individually. It provides fine motor hand gestures that aren’t possible with current commercially available devices. The first amputee to use it, a musician who lost part of his right arm five years ago, is now able to play the piano for the first time since his accident.
14th December 2017

3D-printed implants could improve hearing loss treatments

3D-printed implants could improve hearing loss treatments
Researchers using CT scans and 3D printing have created accurate, custom-designed prosthetic replacements for damaged parts of the middle ear, according to a study being presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). The technique has the potential to improve a surgical procedure that often fails because of incorrectly sized prosthetic implants, researchers said.
14th December 2017


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Building IoT products for smart healthcare market
8th February 2018
United Kingdom Cocoon Networks, London
Medical Japan 2018
21st February 2018
Japan INTEX Osaka
Med-Tech Innovation Expo 2018
25th April 2018
United Kingdom Ricoh Arena, Coventry