Treatment

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Smartphones advance diagnosis and treatment

Smartphones advance diagnosis and treatment
Smartphones are revolutionising the diagnosis and treatment of illnesses, thanks to add-ons and apps that make their ubiquitous small screens into medical devices, researchers say. "If you look at the camera, the flash, the microphone... they all are getting better and better," said Shwetak Patel, engineering professor at the University of Washington. "In fact the capabilities on those phones are as great as some of the specialised devices," he told the AAAS annual meeting.
20th February 2017

BIOTRONIK introduces Its first stent in U.S.

BIOTRONIK introduces Its first stent in U.S.
BIOTRONIK has just landed its first FDA approval for a coronary stent. The PRO-Kinetic Energy CoCr metal stent is intended for placement within narrow arteries, only between 2.25 and 4 mm in diameter, and features struts that are nearly microscopic at 60 µm in width. The narrow struts and the helical design make the stent very flexible for easier delivery through tortuous vasculature.
16th February 2017

Research makes latest cancer treatment more precise

Researchers in Germany have taken an important step towards improving the accuracy of a highly effective radiotherapy technique used to treat cancer. The team, from the German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Centre (HIT) and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), hoped to address uncertainty about the dosimetry – the measurement and assessment of the absorbed radiation dose – for carbon ion beam therapy.
16th February 2017


LifeFlow aids sepsis and shock

LifeFlow aids sepsis and shock
410 Medical, a company out of Durham, North Carolina, is releasing in the US its LifeFlow Rapid Infuser for treating patients afflicted by sepsis or shock. The device can help infuse 500 milliliters of crystalloid fluid into a patient within two and a half minutes, including in both adults and children, and an entire litre can be delivered within five minutes. The FDA cleared device has so far been tested at the WakeMed Health & Hospitals in Raleigh, North Carolina.
15th February 2017

Magnetic implant offers alternative drug delivery method

Magnetic implant offers alternative drug delivery method
University of British Columbia researchers have developed a magnetic drug implant—the first of its kind in Canada—that could offer an alternative for patients struggling with numerous pills or intravenous injections. The device, a silicone sponge with magnetic carbonyl iron particles wrapped in a round polymer layer, measures just six millimetres in diameter. The drug is injected into the device and then surgically implanted in the area being treated.
14th February 2017

Klotho could unlock treatments for kidney and heart disease

Klotho could unlock treatments for kidney and heart disease
A study by researchers at King's College London has found that patients with diabetes suffering from the early stages of kidney disease have a deficiency of the protective 'anti-ageing' hormone, Klotho. The study, published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]), suggests that Klotho may play a significant role in the development of kidney disease, which is often prevalent in patients with diabetes.
13th February 2017

Enzyme-like drugs against Alzheimer's disease

Enzyme-like drugs against Alzheimer's disease
Catalytic molecules are emerging as powerful medicines. European scientists exploited this paradigm of modern medicine to produce novel drugs against Alzheimer's disease. The growing incidence and socioeconomic burden of Alzheimer's disease emphasises the need for novel therapies. Medium sized peptide-transition metal complexes can act as enzymes and perform proteolysis of pathogen substrates, overcoming many of the difficulties encountered with present drugs.
10th February 2017

Project could lead to gene-based cancer treatments

Project could lead to gene-based cancer treatments
A breakthrough in understanding the role of a specific lymphoid cell gene has been achieved thanks to an EU Marie Curie research grant. The findings could lead to new targeted treatments for leukaemia and other types of cancers. The body’s immune system is a true marvel of biological engineering, made up of structures and processes that cooperate to identify and attack viruses, bacteria and parasites while sparing the body itself.
10th February 2017

Brazilian peppertree disarms antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Brazilian peppertree disarms antibiotic-resistant bacteria
The red berries of the Brazilian peppertree—a weedy, invasive species common in Florida—contain an extract with the power to disarm dangerous antibiotic-resistant staph bacteria, scientists at Emory University have discovered. The journal Scientific Reports is publishing the finding, made in the lab of Cassandra Quave, an assistant professor in Emory's Center for the Study of Human Health and in the School of Medicine's Department of Dermatology.
10th February 2017

DNA “barcoding” aids therapeutic delivery

DNA “barcoding” aids therapeutic delivery
Using tiny snippets of DNA as “barcodes,” researchers have developed a new technique for rapidly screening the ability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to specific organs of the body. The technique could accelerate the development and use of gene therapies for such killers as heart disease, cancer and Parkinson’s disease. Genetic therapies, such as those made from DNA or RNA, are hard to deliver into the right cells in the body.
9th February 2017


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LASER World of PHOTONICS 2017
26th June 2017
Germany Messe Munchen