Testing and Monitoring

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AI uncovers insight into biophysics of cancer

AI uncovers insight into biophysics of cancer
Scientists from Tufts University's School of Arts and Sciences, the Allen Discovery Center at Tufts, and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County have used artificial intelligence to gain insight into the biophysics of cancer. Their machine-learning platform predicted a trio of reagents that was able to generate a never-before-seen cancer-like phenotype in tadpoles.
27th January 2017

Technique reveals circuitry of Parkinson’s disease tremours

Technique reveals circuitry of Parkinson’s disease tremours
If a piece of electronics isn’t working, troubleshooting the problem often involves probing the flow of electricity through the various components of the circuit to locate any faulty parts. Stanford bioengineer and neuroscientist Jin Hyung Lee, who studies Parkinson’s disease, has adapted that idea to diseases of the brain, creating a new way to turn on specific types of neurons in order to observe how this affects the whole brain. The work is described in Neuron.
27th January 2017

Mobile microscope analyses cancer tumours and infections

Mobile microscope analyses cancer tumours and infections
With the help of a microscope which is attached to a regular mobile, doctors can diagnose for example cancer tumours, infections and tuberculosis. The invention could become a weapon in the fight against antibiotic resistance. A small, simple and relatively cheap microscope which is printed using a 3D printer and coupled to the camera of a mobile phone can be used to assess tumours, bacteria, viruses and fungal cells.
19th January 2017


How solvents affect the skin

How solvents affect the skin
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a method that makes it possible to see how individual molecules from solvents in skin creams, medicated ointments and cleaning products affect and interact with the skin’s own molecules. In the study, the researchers have examined how molecules added to the skin through various liquids and creams affect the skin, and how the same molecules are affected by being inside the skin.
18th January 2017

Modelling sheds light on bacteria behaviour

A study into how bacteria move, behave, and form colonies could allow a better understanding of infections, and pave the way to new antimicrobial treatments. For their paper, published in the New Journal of Physics, the interdisciplinary team from the Max Planck Institute and Helmholtz-Center, Dresden, and from Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, used multiscale computer modelling of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae bacteria to reveal how bacteria use pili to spread the infection by self-assembling into microcolonies and, eventually, biofilms.
9th January 2017

Hologram video player shows your beating heart

Hologram video player shows your beating heart
UK scientists are developing an interactive holographic video created from an MRI or CT scan that can display live footage of internal organs in front of a user where features can be rotated, enlarged, and isolated, delivering a breakthrough in medical imaging and education. Popping in to your local hospital may be much more revealing in as little as three years thanks to engineers at Holoxica Limited, who have invented a moving 3D video hologram.
3rd January 2017

Ultrasound technique reveals the inside of live cells

Ultrasound technique reveals the inside of live cells
Researchers at The University of Nottingham have developed a breakthrough technique that uses sound rather than light to see inside live cells, with potential application in stem-cell transplants and cancer diagnosis. The nanoscale ultrasound technique uses shorter-than-optical wavelengths of sound and could even rival the optical super-resolution techniques which won the 2014 Nobel Prize for Chemistry.
21st December 2016

Stem cells could reduce number of animal experiments

Stem cells could reduce number of animal experiments
To develop new treatments for skin cancer, drugs need to be tested on animals. Now scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing in Cologne have been able to grow mouse skin stem cells in a dish. These stem cells in a test-tube could reduce the number of animal experiments. Wounds need to heal and dead hairs need to be replaced. Responsible for this are the so-called hair follicle stem cells in our skin.
20th December 2016

Identifying suitable target antigens by mass spectrometry

Identifying suitable target antigens by mass spectrometry
Cancer therapies harness the immune system to fight tumors. One of the main principles behind these therapies is to find out precisely which molecules on cancer cells trigger an immune response. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry has for the first time identified suitable protein structures directly from patients` tumor cells. The procedure therefore opens up new possibilities for individualised targeted cancer treatments.
16th December 2016

A non-invasive method to detect infections in prostheses

A non-invasive method to detect infections in prostheses
  Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a non-invasive method to detect infections in prostheses used for amputees, as well as for knee, hip and other joint replacements. The method, which is at the proof of concept stage, consists of a simple imaging technique and an innovative material to coat the prostheses.
14th December 2016


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