Surgery

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Simulation technology leads to better surgery planning

Simulation technology leads to better surgery planning
A team of researchers led by Stanford engineers has moved a step closer to helping surgeons more safely perform a life-saving procedure for victims of brain trauma. While surgeons have long performed an operation called a decompressive craniectomy – cutting a hole in the skull to give the swelling brain space to expand – the technique requires a fair amount of guesswork on how best to proceed.
28th September 2016

Alternative to brain surgery could control movement disorder

Alternative to brain surgery could control movement disorder
  A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine offers the most in-depth assessment yet of the safety and effectiveness of a high-tech alternative to brain surgery to treat the uncontrollable shaking caused by the most common movement disorder.
25th August 2016

Brain surgery robots installed at King's College Hospital

Brain surgery robots installed at King's College Hospital
  A neuromate stereotactic robot system and neuroinspire surgical planning software have been installed at one of London's largest and busiest teaching hospitals, King's College Hospital, Renishaw is pleased to announce.
16th August 2016


Sensor helps anaesthetists accurately guide needles

Sensor helps anaesthetists accurately guide needles
Over 13 million pain-blocking epidurals are performed every year in the United States and, although generally regarded as safe, there are complications in up to 10% of cases where the needles are inserted too far or placed in the wrong tissue. Researchers from MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital hope to improve this statistic with a new sensor that can be embedded into an epidural needle, helping anaesthetists guide the needle to the correct location.
16th August 2016

Vibrations in tools could improve surgeons' sensitivity

Vibrations in tools could improve surgeons' sensitivity
A small vibrating device added to surgical tools could improve surgeons' sensitivity to different shapes and textures inside their patients' bodies. Engineers from Hiroshima University have designed the small vibrating device to attach to any existing hand-held surgical tool and be used instantly, without requiring extra training for doctors. During minimally invasive surgeries, surgeons rely on long, thin, metal tools to explore their patients' bodies.
1st August 2016

Minimally traumatic and inexpensive ceramic laser scalpel

Scientists from MIPT and their colleagues have developed a compact and powerful ceramic-based laser with applications in minimally traumatic and inexpensive laser surgical scalpels, and also for cutting and engraving composite materials. The results of the study have been published in Optics Letters. Today, lasers are in consumer electronics devices, medicine, metallurgy, metrology, meteorology, and many other areas.
20th July 2016

3D-printed models prepare doctors for rhinological surgery

3D-printed models prepare doctors for rhinological surgery
Patients who walk into Dr. Jose Gurrola II's otolaryngology clinic at the University of Virginia Health System are seeking relief from a wide range of nasal issues, from nosebleeds and chronic sinusitis to brain fluid leaks. To assess the patients and determine the best course of action, Gurrola or a member of his team may perform an endoscopy – a procedure that involves taking a camera with a long scope on the end and inserting it into a patient's nasal cavity.
19th July 2016

'Nano scalpel' allows nanometre precision

'Nano scalpel' allows nanometre precision
A "nano scalpel" enables scientists at DESY to prepare samples or materials with nanometre precision while following the process with a scanning electron microscope. The Focused Ion Beam, or FIB, microscope which has now gone into service also allows a detailed view of the inner structure of materials. The device was purchased by the University of Bayreuth, as part of a joint research project on the DESY campus funded by the Federal Ministry of Research.
11th July 2016

'Surgify' makes cranial surgery safer and faster

An estimated 770 000 skull opening procedures are performed worldwide every year. In approximately 30% of these surgeries, some degree of damage is caused to the tissues under the skull. 'Drilling is one of the riskiest parts of bone and dental procedures, as it requires physical force while extreme care must be taken with vulnerable tissues or vessels and nerves within the bones,' says Visa Sippola, Project Coordinator.
7th July 2016

Technique could revolutionise surgical treatment of epilepsy

Technique could revolutionise surgical treatment of epilepsy
Scientists at the University of Exeter have developed a pioneering new technique that could revolutionise the surgical treatment of epilepsy. The team of scientists, led by Dr Marc Goodfellow and Professor John Terry, have developed the ground-breaking new method that can identify the specific regions of the brain that trigger seizures in people with epilepsy.
7th July 2016


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LASER World of PHOTONICS 2017
26th June 2017
Germany Messe Munchen