Surgery

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Minimally invasive instrument moves like a surgeon's hand

Minimally invasive instrument moves like a surgeon's hand
In an era of spiraling health care cost concerns, a $500 surgical instrument developed at the University of Michigan is vying to take the place of a $2 million robot for certain minimally invasive procedures. U-M startup FlexDex Surgical's first product—a simple, ergonomic and intuitive "needle driver" for stitching inside the body—has been used for the first time in a series of operations.
24th February 2017

Simulations can improve heart surgeries

Simulations can improve heart surgeries
MRI and CT scans provide physicians with a detailed picture of their patients’ internal anatomy. Heart surgeons often use these images to plan surgeries. Unfortunately, these anatomical images don’t show how the blood is flowing through the vessels — which is critical, according to Alison Marsden, PhD, a Stanford associate professor of pediatrics and of bioengineering. In the video above, she explains that many surgeons now use a pencil and paper to sketch out their surgical plan based on the patient’s images.
16th February 2017

Diagnosing tumours during brain surgeries

Diagnosing tumours during brain surgeries
If a tumour is suspected during brain surgery, it takes 30-40 minutes from the time of removing the sample from the patient’s brain to the time of diagnosis. The sample is taken through a rigorous process of tissue sectioning, staining, mounting, and interpretation by pathologists. Researchers from University of Michigan have now developed an imaging technique that could significantly reduce the time taken for such diagnoses.
9th February 2017


Technique reduces diagnosis time during brain surgery

Technique reduces diagnosis time during brain surgery
An approach to the practice of surgical pathology for brain tumour patients could make for a powerful combination: more accurate, safer and more efficient operations. Neurosurgeons and pathologists at Michigan Medicine are the first to execute stimulated Raman histology, a method that improves speed and diagnostic efficiency, in an operating room. They detail the advance in a Nature Biomedical Engineering paper.
6th February 2017

Fluorescent probe targets pancreatic cancer cells

Fluorescent probe targets pancreatic cancer cells
A diagnosis of pancreatic cancer often means the patient has less than a year to live, and some reports suggest that pancreatic cancer will become the second-leading cause of cancer-related death in the next fifteen years. Patients often require surgery to remove the cancerous tissue as chemotherapy or radiation do not significantly improve patient prognosis.
3rd February 2017

Mixed reality simulation solution makes use of HoloLens

Mixed reality simulation solution makes use of HoloLens
On the eve of the International Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare (IMSH) in Orlando, Florida, CAE Healthcare announced the release of CAE VimedixAR, an ultrasound training simulator integrated with the Microsoft HoloLens. CAE Healthcare will be the first company to bring a commercial Microsoft HoloLens application to the medical simulation market.
1st February 2017

Tattoos mark the spot for surgery and then disappear

Tattoos mark the spot for surgery and then disappear
Tattoos aren't just for body art. They can have medical applications, too. Doctors are using them on patients to mark an area for future treatment - particularly for non-melanoma skin cancer such as basal cell carcinoma - but the inks can cause problems. Now scientists have developed a better solution. In the journal ACS Nano, they report an ink that glows only under certain light conditions and can disappear altogether after a period of time.
22nd December 2016

Stimulator bypasses spine injury and helps patients move hands

Stimulator bypasses spine injury and helps patients move hands
Doctors at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center have implanted a spinal stimulator that is showing early promise in returning hand strength and movement to a California man who broke his neck in a dirt-biking accident five years ago. Brian Gomez, 28, became one of the world's first patients to undergo surgery for the experimental device in June 2016. UCLA scientists positioned the 32-electrode stimulator below the site of Gomez's spinal-cord injury, near the C-5 vertebrae in the middle of his neck.
13th December 2016

Device lets women do part of breast reconstruction at home

Device lets women do part of breast reconstruction at home
This might be the ultimate do-it-yourself project: Doctors are testing a device that would let women do part of their own breast reconstruction at home. It's aimed at not only making treatment more comfortable and convenient, but also giving women a sense of control—something cancer often takes away. More than 100,000 women each year in the United States have surgery to remove a cancerous breast, and many of them choose reconstruction with an implant.
16th November 2016

‘Prototype pathway’ yields organ transplant technology

‘Prototype pathway’ yields organ transplant technology
Organ transplantation has come a long way from its early days in the mid-twentieth century. But even with major medical advances, there’s still an admittedly familiar factor at play: ice. Just prior to transplantation, an organ is reconstructed and prepared in the sterile operating room during what is known as the “backbench procedure.” As surgeons prepare the organ, it stays cooled and preserved in a hypothermic state in a basin on a bed of sterile ice.
14th November 2016


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LASER World of PHOTONICS 2017
26th June 2017
Germany Messe Munchen