Surgery

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Mixed reality simulation solution makes use of HoloLens

Mixed reality simulation solution makes use of HoloLens
On the eve of the International Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare (IMSH) in Orlando, Florida, CAE Healthcare announced the release of CAE VimedixAR, an ultrasound training simulator integrated with the Microsoft HoloLens. CAE Healthcare will be the first company to bring a commercial Microsoft HoloLens application to the medical simulation market.
1st February 2017

Tattoos mark the spot for surgery and then disappear

Tattoos mark the spot for surgery and then disappear
Tattoos aren't just for body art. They can have medical applications, too. Doctors are using them on patients to mark an area for future treatment - particularly for non-melanoma skin cancer such as basal cell carcinoma - but the inks can cause problems. Now scientists have developed a better solution. In the journal ACS Nano, they report an ink that glows only under certain light conditions and can disappear altogether after a period of time.
22nd December 2016

Stimulator bypasses spine injury and helps patients move hands

Stimulator bypasses spine injury and helps patients move hands
Doctors at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center have implanted a spinal stimulator that is showing early promise in returning hand strength and movement to a California man who broke his neck in a dirt-biking accident five years ago. Brian Gomez, 28, became one of the world's first patients to undergo surgery for the experimental device in June 2016. UCLA scientists positioned the 32-electrode stimulator below the site of Gomez's spinal-cord injury, near the C-5 vertebrae in the middle of his neck.
13th December 2016


Simulation technology leads to better surgery planning

Simulation technology leads to better surgery planning
A team of researchers led by Stanford engineers has moved a step closer to helping surgeons more safely perform a life-saving procedure for victims of brain trauma. While surgeons have long performed an operation called a decompressive craniectomy – cutting a hole in the skull to give the swelling brain space to expand – the technique requires a fair amount of guesswork on how best to proceed.
28th September 2016

Alternative to brain surgery could control movement disorder

Alternative to brain surgery could control movement disorder
  A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine offers the most in-depth assessment yet of the safety and effectiveness of a high-tech alternative to brain surgery to treat the uncontrollable shaking caused by the most common movement disorder.
25th August 2016

Brain surgery robots installed at King's College Hospital

Brain surgery robots installed at King's College Hospital
  A neuromate stereotactic robot system and neuroinspire surgical planning software have been installed at one of London's largest and busiest teaching hospitals, King's College Hospital, Renishaw is pleased to announce.
16th August 2016

Vibrations in tools could improve surgeons' sensitivity

Vibrations in tools could improve surgeons' sensitivity
A small vibrating device added to surgical tools could improve surgeons' sensitivity to different shapes and textures inside their patients' bodies. Engineers from Hiroshima University have designed the small vibrating device to attach to any existing hand-held surgical tool and be used instantly, without requiring extra training for doctors. During minimally invasive surgeries, surgeons rely on long, thin, metal tools to explore their patients' bodies.
1st August 2016

3D-printed models prepare doctors for rhinological surgery

3D-printed models prepare doctors for rhinological surgery
Patients who walk into Dr. Jose Gurrola II's otolaryngology clinic at the University of Virginia Health System are seeking relief from a wide range of nasal issues, from nosebleeds and chronic sinusitis to brain fluid leaks. To assess the patients and determine the best course of action, Gurrola or a member of his team may perform an endoscopy – a procedure that involves taking a camera with a long scope on the end and inserting it into a patient's nasal cavity.
19th July 2016

'Surgify' makes cranial surgery safer and faster

An estimated 770 000 skull opening procedures are performed worldwide every year. In approximately 30% of these surgeries, some degree of damage is caused to the tissues under the skull. 'Drilling is one of the riskiest parts of bone and dental procedures, as it requires physical force while extreme care must be taken with vulnerable tissues or vessels and nerves within the bones,' says Visa Sippola, Project Coordinator.
7th July 2016

Scientist programmes robot for 'soft tissue' surgery

Not even the surest surgeon’s hand is quite as steady and consistent as a robotic arm built of metal and plastic, programmed to perform the same motions over and over. So could it handle the slippery stuff of soft tissues during a surgery?
5th May 2016


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LASER World of PHOTONICS 2017
26th June 2017
Germany Messe Munchen