Sensors

Displaying 1 - 10 of 72

Keep your finger on the pulse!

Keep your finger on the pulse!
Willow Technologies has unveiled the new heart rate optical sensor from Rohm - the BH1790GLC. Utilising a specialised optical filter which enables high accuracy detection, extending battery life while reducing the effects of IRraysten-fold versus conventional products. Making it possible to achieve high quality pulse signals even in environments with strong IR presence, such as the outdoors or under intense movement.
3rd November 2017

Sensor measures lipolysis by testing a person’s exhalations

Sensor measures lipolysis by testing a person’s exhalations
Experts advise anyone looking to shed extra kilos to eat less and exercise more. One way is with endurance training, during which the body burns not only carbohydrates such as sugar, but also fat. When exactly the body begins burning fat can now be determined by analysing, for example, biomarkers in the blood or urine. Scientists at ETH Zurich and the University Hospital Zurich have now developed a method for the highly convenient, real-time monitoring of lipolysis by testing a person’s exhalations during exercise.
16th October 2017

Stretchable fibre optic measures changes in body movements

Stretchable fibre optic measures changes in body movements
Engineers at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China have now developed a way to use a special optical fibre to detect minute changes in the movement of various body parts. The advancement will hopefully help patients undergoing musculoskeletal rehabilitation, athletes improve their training techniques, and everyone to play video games in an exciting new way. Though the approach is not entirely new, as fibre optics are already widely used to measure physical strains that buildings and bridges are subjected to.
16th October 2017


Future smartwatches could sense hand movement

Future smartwatches could sense hand movement
New research has shown future wearable devices, such as smartwatches, could use ultrasound imaging to sense hand gestures. The research team led by Professor Mike Fraser, Asier Marzo and Jess McIntosh from the Bristol Interaction Group (BIG) at the University of Bristol, together with University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust (UH Bristol), presented their paper this summer at one of the world’s most important conferences on human-computer interfaces, ACM CHI 2017 held in Denver, USA.
13th October 2017

Sensors can detect movement in GI tract

Sensors can detect movement in GI tract
Researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women’s Hospital have built a flexible sensor that can be rolled up and swallowed. Upon ingestion, the sensor adheres to the stomach wall or intestinal lining, where it can measure the rhythmic contractions of the digestive tract. Such sensors could help doctors to diagnose gastrointestinal disorders that slow down the passage of food through the digestive tract.
13th October 2017

Sensor measures the lowest flow rates in biomedical applications

Sensor measures the lowest flow rates in biomedical applications
Sensirion will be attending the COMPAMED 2017 trade fair in order to present its single-use liquid flow sensor LD20 aimed at the fast, precise and reliable measurement of the lowest flow rates. The showcased flow sensor series is based on a successful design study that was first presented in 2014 and has already received several international awards. Product development of the LD20-2600B, the first representative of the new single-use sensor series, is now complete and it is ready for high-volume production.
12th October 2017

Biosensor can detect antibiotic production by microbes

Biosensor can detect antibiotic production by microbes
Researchers from North Carolina State University have engineered designer biosensors that can detect antibiotic molecules of interest. The biosensors are a first step toward creating antibiotic-producing “factories” within microbes such as E. coli. Macrolides are a group of naturally occurring small molecules that can have antibiotic, antifungal or anticancer effects. The antibiotic erythromycin is one example – it is a macrolide produced by soil-dwelling bacteria.
6th October 2017

The Internet of Medical Things is born

The Internet of Medical Things is born
Having already established itself in the consumer market, the digital revolution and its related IoT concept is rapidly changing health models. Yole Développement’s analysts announce an impressive $9bn market in 2016 with a 16% CAGR between 2016 and 2022. Connected devices are now part of the IoT industry: the Internet of Medical Things (IoMT) is born. Such developments have been performed in parallel of the numerous technical innovations dedicated to the consumer applications.
7th September 2017

IoT asset health tracking and remote toxic gas sensing

Analog Devices evaluation and development platforms provide frameworks for rapid IoT application development with ADI's industry leading sensors, transcievers, and microcontrollers.
23rd August 2017

Temporary tattoo made of graphene tracks vital signs

Temporary tattoo made of graphene tracks vital signs
A graphene health sensor that goes on the skin like a temporary tattoo takes measurements with the same precision as bulky medical equipment. The graphene tattoos, presented in December at the International Electron Devices Meeting in San Francisco, are the thinnest epidermal electronics ever made. They can measure electrical signals from the heart, muscles, and brain, as well as skin temperature and hydration.
7th August 2017


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SPS IPC Drives 2017
28th November 2017
Germany Nuremberg
Cyber Security - Oil, Gas, Power 2017
29th November 2017
United Kingdom London
AI Tech World
29th November 2017
United Kingdom Olymipa, London
Maker Faire 2017
1st December 2017
Italy Rome
Virtual & Augmented Reality Creative Summit 2017
5th December 2017
United Kingdom Picturehouse Central, London