Robotics

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Robotic cleaning technique could automate neuroscience

Robotic cleaning technique could automate neuroscience
For scientists listening in on the faint whispers of brain neurons, a first-ever robotic technique for cleaning the tiny devices that record the signals could facilitate a new level of automation in neuroscience research. That could accelerate the gathering of information used to map the functions of brain cells and ultimately provide a better understanding what’s going on between our ears.
26th October 2016

Doctor, Doctor, my nurse is a robot!

Doctor, Doctor, my nurse is a robot!
The NHS is a permanent topic in the news, from strikes and concerns of A&E staff numbers, to care home neglect and the dangers of superbugs and healthcare associated infections (HCAI). To aid this, there have been some developments in robotics to alleviate the strain on healthcare professionals. Electronic Specifier’s Daisy Stapley-Bunten gets up close and personal with the new face of healthcare.
31st August 2016

Brain surgery robots installed at King's College Hospital

Brain surgery robots installed at King's College Hospital
  A neuromate stereotactic robot system and neuroinspire surgical planning software have been installed at one of London's largest and busiest teaching hospitals, King's College Hospital, Renishaw is pleased to announce.
16th August 2016


Remote-controlled microrobots aid medical operations

Remote-controlled microrobots aid medical operations
EPFL scientist Selman Sakar teamed up with Hen-Wei Huang and Bradley Nelson at ETHZ to develop a simple and versatile method for building bio-inspired robots and equipping them with advanced features. They also created a platform for testing several robot designs and studying different modes of locomotion. Their work, published in Nature Communications, produced complex reconfigurable microrobots that can be manufactured with high throughput.
22nd July 2016

Prototype robot helps improve sports recovery

Trials of a prototype robot for sports therapy have just begun in Singapore, to create a high quality and repeatable treatment routine to improve sports recovery, reducing reliance on trained therapists. The robot named Emma, short for Expert Manipulative Massage Automation, has already treated 50 patients in trials including professional athletes for conditions ranging from tennis elbows, stiff neck and shoulders, to lower back pain.
22nd July 2016

Coin-sized scanner to target blindness

A European group of scientists are working on the development of a breakthrough, compact, cost-effective retinal scanner that will play a key role in targeting the early diagnosis of retinal diseases that are worldwide leading causes of blindness. Funded by the Photonics PPP platform, OCTChip is set to revolutionise diagnosis of retinal diseases and prevent millions of cases of blindness.
10th June 2016

Scientist programmes robot for 'soft tissue' surgery

Not even the surest surgeon’s hand is quite as steady and consistent as a robotic arm built of metal and plastic, programmed to perform the same motions over and over. So could it handle the slippery stuff of soft tissues during a surgery?
5th May 2016

What are the risks in medical device design?

What are the risks in medical device design?
Jean-Louis Evans, Managing Director at TÜV SÜD Product Service, explains how legislation can keep pace with the fast evolution of medical technology. While medical technology evolves at a fast rate, traditionally test standards develop much more slowly. 
5th April 2016

Is there a computer in the house?

Is there a computer in the house?
Steve Rogerson looks at how the IoT is affecting the medical industry and asks whether the days of the human doctor may be numbered. One of the most prominent areas being impacted by the Internet of Things (IoT) is medical technology, with the promise of remote patient care and people being treated at home whilst being linked to medical staff over various communications links. 
5th April 2016

Robotically driven system could reduce cost of drug discovery

Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University have created the first robotically driven experimentation system to determine the effects of a large number of drugs on many proteins, reducing the number of necessary experiments by 70%. The model, presented in the journal eLife, uses an approach that could lead to accurate predictions of the interactions between novel drugs and their targets, helping to reduce the cost of drug discovery.
11th February 2016


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