Robotics

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Coin-sized scanner to target blindness

A European group of scientists are working on the development of a breakthrough, compact, cost-effective retinal scanner that will play a key role in targeting the early diagnosis of retinal diseases that are worldwide leading causes of blindness. Funded by the Photonics PPP platform, OCTChip is set to revolutionise diagnosis of retinal diseases and prevent millions of cases of blindness.
10th June 2016

Scientist programmes robot for 'soft tissue' surgery

Not even the surest surgeon’s hand is quite as steady and consistent as a robotic arm built of metal and plastic, programmed to perform the same motions over and over. So could it handle the slippery stuff of soft tissues during a surgery?
5th May 2016

What are the risks in medical device design?

What are the risks in medical device design?
Jean-Louis Evans, Managing Director at TÜV SÜD Product Service, explains how legislation can keep pace with the fast evolution of medical technology. While medical technology evolves at a fast rate, traditionally test standards develop much more slowly. 
5th April 2016


Is there a computer in the house?

Is there a computer in the house?
Steve Rogerson looks at how the IoT is affecting the medical industry and asks whether the days of the human doctor may be numbered. One of the most prominent areas being impacted by the Internet of Things (IoT) is medical technology, with the promise of remote patient care and people being treated at home whilst being linked to medical staff over various communications links. 
5th April 2016

Robotically driven system could reduce cost of drug discovery

Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University have created the first robotically driven experimentation system to determine the effects of a large number of drugs on many proteins, reducing the number of necessary experiments by 70%. The model, presented in the journal eLife, uses an approach that could lead to accurate predictions of the interactions between novel drugs and their targets, helping to reduce the cost of drug discovery.
11th February 2016

Wireless sleeve helps recover arm use after a stroke

Wireless sleeve helps recover arm use after a stroke
Scientists at the University of Southampton are to develop and trial a new wearable technology to help people who have had a stroke recover use of their arm and hand. Led by Professor Jane Burridge, the team will create a wireless sleeve, which will provide automatic, intelligent information about muscle movement and strength while patients practice every-day tasks at home.
9th February 2016

Robotic exoskeleton helps the paralysed walk

Robotic exoskeleton helps the paralysed walk
Paralysed from the waist down after a BMX accident, Steven Sanchez rolled into SuitX’s Berkeley, California, office in a wheelchair. A half-hour later he was standing and walking thanks to the Phoenix, a robotic exoskeleton now available for around $40,000. The suit returns movement to wearers’ hips and knees with small motors attached to standard orthotics.
3rd February 2016

Spermbots could help solve male infertility

Spermbots could help solve male infertility
Sperm that don’t swim well rank high among the main causes of infertility. To give these cells a boost, women trying to conceive can turn to artificial insemination or other assisted reproduction techniques, but success can be elusive. In an attempt to improve these odds, scientists have developed motorised 'spermbots' that can deliver poor swimmers — that are otherwise healthy — to an egg. Their report appears in ACS’ journal Nano Letters.
15th January 2016

Video games will compete with drugs as a form of medicine

Video games will compete with drugs as a form of medicine
Last summer, neuroscientist Adam Gazzaley spent two months playing video games. For five days a week, he played Meditrain - which involves meditation and was developed in collaboration with Zynga - on his iPad, and another called Rhythmicity, which he developed with Mickey Hart, drummer for the Grateful Dead, and Rob Garza of Thievery Corporation. "It's based on the hypothesis that our brain is a rhythmic machine," Gazzaley says. 
14th January 2016

Robotics key to making the most of our surgeons

Robotics key to making the most of our surgeons
According to research conducted by the Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU) in 2012, it costs over £560,000 to train a surgeon. This includes investment from both the prospective surgeon and the NHS, a steep price, considering the fact that tuition fees aren’t getting any cheaper. By Graham Mackrell, managing director of Harmonic Drive UK.
3rd December 2015


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EPE 2017 ECCE Europe
11th September 2017
Poland Warsaw
DSEI 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom ExCeL, London
RWM 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom NEC, Birmingham
Productronica India 2017
14th September 2017
India Pragati Maidan, New Delhi
Industry of Things World 2017
18th September 2017
Germany Berlin Congress Center