Research

Displaying 11 - 20 of 245

Modified blood stem cells reverse diabetes in mice

Modified blood stem cells reverse diabetes in mice
Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital have successfully reversed type 1 diabetes in a mouse model by infusing blood stem cells pre-treated to produce more of a protein called PD-L1, which is deficient in mice (and people) with type 1 diabetes. The cells curbed the autoimmune reaction in cells from both mice and humans and reversed hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. Findings were published in Science Translational Medicine.
16th November 2017

Tiny liver tumours created in a dish for the first time

Tiny liver tumours created in a dish for the first time
Scientists have created mini biological models of human primary liver cancers, known as organoids, in the lab for the first time. In a paper published in Nature Medicine, the tiny laboratory models of tumours were used to identify a new drug that could potentially treat certain types of liver cancer. Primary liver cancer is the second most lethal cancer worldwide.
16th November 2017

Research links heading a football to CTE

Research links heading a football to CTE
A documentary aired on the BBC last night (12th November), has explored the link between heading a football and the onset of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a type of dementia associated with repeated blows to the head and recurrent episodes of concussion.
13th November 2017


Nanoparticles limit inflammation by distracting the immune system

Nanoparticles limit inflammation by distracting the immune system
A finding suggests that an injection of nanoparticles may be able to help fight the immune system when it goes haywire, researchers at the University of Michigan have shown. The nanoparticles divert immune cells that cause inflammation away from an injury site. Inflammation is a double-edged sword. When it works, it helps the body heal and fights off infections. But sometimes, the immune system overreacts.
13th November 2017

Scientists figure out how timer for cell division works

Scientists figure out how timer for cell division works
Human cells use a timer to divide: each cell gets at least 30 minutes to divide its genetic material between the nuclei of two daughter cells. Researchers at KU Leuven have unravelled how this timer is switched on and off. Their findings open up perspectives for the treatment of cancer, as keeping the timer going would stop cancer cells from dividing. Our body is constantly building new tissue and replacing dead or damaged cells through cell division.
10th November 2017

Studying patients’ cancer genomes with blood samples

Studying patients’ cancer genomes with blood samples
  Researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Massachusetts General Hospital have developed an accurate, scalable approach for monitoring cancer DNA from blood samples.
8th November 2017

Impressive cognitive ability might make you feel sheepish

Impressive cognitive ability might make you feel sheepish
Sheep can be trained to recognise human faces from photographic portraits – and can even identify the picture of their handler without prior training – according to new research from scientists at the University of Cambridge. The study, published in the journal Royal Society: Open Science, is part a series of tests given to the sheep to monitor their cognitive abilities.
8th November 2017

Alternative cancer treatment alleviates the need for animal testing

Alternative cancer treatment alleviates the need for animal testing
A new technology that simulates tumours has been shown to perform as well as research animals in testing chemotherapy drugs, representing a potential tool for screening drugs before treating a patient. A long-term goal is to incorporate biopsied cancer cells from patients and test the effectiveness of different drugs on the patient-derived cells, said Bumsoo Han, a Purdue University professor of mechanical and biomedical engineering.
6th November 2017

Scientists identify 27 novel cancer genes

Scientists identify 27 novel cancer genes
Researchers from KU Leuven and the Francis Crick Institute have pinpointed 27 novel genes thought to prevent cancer from forming. Their findings could help develop personalised cancer treatments that target these genes. “Our cells have two copies of tumour suppressor genes that, when lost in mutated cells, cause cancer,” says Jonas Demeulemeester. “Using a new statistical model, we’ve uncovered 27 novel tumour suppressor genes.”
6th November 2017

Study shows how the brain reacts to difficult moral issues

Study shows how the brain reacts to difficult moral issues
  The family relationship between film characters clearly affects the reactions in the viewers' brain. The study has also detected a significant conflict between the reactions of the brain and the person's own account. Are we more prone to help the person that resembles us the most?
30th October 2017


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