Research

Displaying 11 - 20 of 203

Optimising immunisation with T cell receptors

Optimising immunisation with T cell receptors
When T cells encounter an antigen, they proliferate and produce various types of daughter cells. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now refuted the prevailing hypothesis that this immune response is largely predetermined by the individual structure of the T cell receptor. Instead, the influence of the T cell receptor can be described only in probabilistic terms. Such mathematical models may help to improve the design of future vaccination strategies.
1st August 2017

How does cell segregation can prevent cancer spread?

How does cell segregation can prevent cancer spread?
Scientists have uncovered how cells are kept in the right place as the body develops, which may shed light on what causes invasive cancer cells to migrate. In order for organs to develop properly, cells from different tissues need to be separated by sharp borders that persist throughout our lifetime. The mechanisms that keep cells in the right place are lost in cancer cells, allowing them to invade other cell populations and spread to different tissues.
31st July 2017

Blue light from digital devices lessens sleep quality

Blue light from digital devices lessens sleep quality
A study by researchers at the University of Houston College of Optometry, published in Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics, found that blue light emitted from digital devices could contribute to the high prevalence of reported sleep dysfunction. Study participants, ages 17-42, wore short wavelength-blocking glasses three hours before bedtime for two weeks, while still performing their nightly digital routine.
31st July 2017


Diabetes can be tracked with Google search engine

Diabetes can be tracked with Google search engine
  The emergence of Type 2 Diabetes could be more effectively monitored using our Google searches - helping public health officials keep track of the disease and halt its spread - according to research by the University of Warwick.
28th July 2017

More precise treatments for depression in women

More precise treatments for depression in women
Among women in the United States, depression is at epidemic levels: Approximately 12 million women in the U.S. experience clinical depression each year, and more than 12% of women can expect to experience depression in their lifetime. Moreover, many experts believe the numbers are likely higher, given the degree of under-reporting about the condition, the fact that depression in women is often misdiagnosed and the fact that fewer than half of women who experience clinical depression will ever seek care.
28th July 2017

Research links pain sensitivity to autism

Research links pain sensitivity to autism
Research by a UT Dallas neuroscientist has established a link between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and pain sensitivity. The study, led by Dr. Xiaosi Gu, outlines alternations in pain perception faced by people on the autism spectrum and how those changes can affect them in social functions. "This provides some of the first evidence that links pain perception to social function in ASD.
24th July 2017

1.2 microseconds in the life of a HIV capsid

1.2 microseconds in the life of a HIV capsid
It took two years on a supercomputer to simulate 1.2 microseconds in the life of the HIV capsid, a protein cage that shuttles the HIV virus to the nucleus of a human cell. The 64-million-atom simulation offers new insights into how the virus senses its environment and completes its infective cycle. The findings are reported in the journal Nature Communications.
19th July 2017

Independent brain activation patterns in bilingual people

Independent brain activation patterns in bilingual people
A team of researchers from China and the U.S. has found independent brain activation patterns in bilingual people when they switch between languages. In their paper published in Science Advances, the group explains how they used a two-pronged approach to learn more about how the brain allows people to speak in more than one language. Scientists have long been intrigued by the brain's ability to learn more than one language—perhaps equally intriguing is the ability of the brain to instantly switch between languages.
13th July 2017

Ensuring that medical trainers are not out on a limb

Ensuring that medical trainers are not out on a limb
Providing anatomically accurate and procedurally correct models used in training the next generation of medical practitioners, Limbs and Things has recently turned to band saw specialist Starrett for support. We all know that it takes a lot of dedication to choose a career in medicine. To become a GP takes around five years of further training on top of a medical degree, and to become a hospital consultant it can take between seven and nine years. Therefore, Limbs and Things provide vital services to this training process.
13th July 2017

Solution reverses antibiotic drug resistance

Solution reverses antibiotic drug resistance
Cancer researchers in the UK may have stumbled across a solution to reverse antibiotic drug resistance and stop infections like MRSA. Experts warn we are decades behind in the race against superbugs having already exploited naturally occurring antibiotics, with the creation of new ones requiring time, money and ingenuity. But a team of scientists at the University of Salford say they may have found a very simple way forward – even though they weren't even looking for antibiotics.
13th July 2017


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