Research

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microRNAs could protect the brain from developing epilepsy

microRNAs could protect the brain from developing epilepsy
On December 16, 1997, hundreds of Japanese children were brought to hospital suffering from epilepsy-like seizures. They all had one thing in common: they had been watching an episode of the Pokemon TV show when their symptoms began. Doctors determined that their symptoms were triggered by five seconds of intensely bright flashing lights on the popular TV program. But why did the lights affect a few hundred children while thousands of other viewers were unharmed?
6th June 2017

Scientists identify more than a hundred genes linked to memory

Scientists identify more than a hundred genes linked to memory
Scientists have identified more than 100 genes linked to memory, opening new avenues of research to better understand memory processing in the human brain. A study at the Peter O'Donnell Jr. Brain Institute includes the results of a new strategy to identify genes that underlie specific brain processes. This strategy may eventually help scientists develop treatments for patients with memory impairments.
2nd June 2017

Cholesterol is a key player at the lung surface

Cholesterol is a key player at the lung surface
The zone in the lung where the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide takes place between the body and the air we inhale are called the alveoli. Now, in a joint study, researchers in chemistry and medicine at Lund University have more closely examined the thin film of proteins and fats that stabilises and protects the alveoli. This film, known as surfactant, also affects the transport of various molecules between the air and the body’s blood vessels.
1st June 2017


Identifying the genetic cause of childhood cancer

Identifying the genetic cause of childhood cancer
Scientists have identified a genetic mutation that causes a childhood kidney cancer called Wilms' tumour. The research revealed how loss of control over the number of chromosomes in a cell can lead to cancer. Researchers looked at families with a rare genetic syndrome called mosaic variegated aneuploidy (MVA) to try to identify mutations that might be linked to Wilms' tumour.
31st May 2017

Zebrafish unveils the causes of human hearing loss

Zebrafish unveils the causes of human hearing loss
Can a fish with a malformed jaw tell us something about hearing loss in mice and humans? The answer is yes, according to a publication in Scientific Reports. In one of the fascinating twists of evolution, the structures supporting the jaws of ancestral fish gave rise to three tiny bones in the mammalian middle ear: the malleus, incus, and the stapes, which transmit sound vibrations.
31st May 2017

Stem cells yield blueprint for body’s vasculature

Stem cells yield blueprint for body’s vasculature
In the average adult human, there are an estimated 100,000 miles of capillaries, veins and arteries — the plumbing that carries life-sustaining blood to every part of the body, including vital organs such as the heart and the brain. When things go wrong with vasculature, the result can be a heart attack, stroke or other life-threatening or chronic condition.
31st May 2017

Tea consumption could lead to epigenetic changes in women

Tea consumption could lead to epigenetic changes in women
Epigenetic changes are chemical modifications that turn our genes off or on. In a new study from Uppsala University, researchers show that tea consumption in women leads to epigenetic changes in genes that are known to interact with cancer and estrogen metabolism. The results are published in the journal Human Molecular Genetics. It is well known that our environment and lifestyle factors, such as food choices, smoking and exposure to chemicals, can lead to epigenetic changes.
31st May 2017

Research project focuses on microbial communities

Research project focuses on microbial communities
Led by ETH Zurich and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), three ETH research groups are collaborating with several US universities to investigate microbial ecosystems, with a special focus on the oceans. The research project, named Theory of Microbial Ecosystems (THE-ME), is supported by the Simons Foundation, which will provide 15 million US dollars over a period of at least five years.
31st May 2017

Neurons responsible for sound localisation have unique feature

Neurons responsible for sound localisation have unique feature
To localise sounds, particularly low-frequency sounds, mammals must perceive minimal differences in the timing of signal reception between the two ears. LMU researchers now describe a unique feature of the neurons responsible for this task. In the mammalian auditory system, sound waves impinging on the tympanic membrane of the ear are transduced into electrical signals by sensory hair cells and transmitted via the auditory nerve to the brainstem.
30th May 2017

Another sleepless night? Your brain might be eating itself

Another sleepless night? Your brain might be eating itself
A new study has revealed that chronic sleep deprivation can actually cause the brain to eat itself. Michele Bellesi of the Marche Polytechnic University in Italy analysed the brains of mice who had regular sleep, spontaneous wake, sleep deprivation and chronic sleep deprivation. The results, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, found that the brain cells that destroy and digest worn-out cells and debris go into overdrive in mice that are chronically sleep-deprived. 
30th May 2017


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EPE 2017 ECCE Europe
11th September 2017
Poland Warsaw
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