Research

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Research indicates market growth for BCI technology

Research indicates market growth for BCI technology
Recent analysis from Frost & Sullivan has shown that visible progress in the development of human enablement and enhancement technologies has given a huge boost to its mass adoption potential.
19th July 2016

High-resolution imaging reveals bacterial toxins

Many bacteria use specialised toxins to attack and infect other cells. Scientists at EPFL and the University of Bern have now modeled a major such toxin with unprecedented resolution, uncovering the way it works step-by-step. In order to infect other cells, many bacteria secrete a type of toxin that punctures the membrane of the target cell and form a pore; as a result, the cell dies.
13th July 2016

Juice improves the examination of the gastrointestinal tract

Juice improves the examination of the gastrointestinal tract
  The pigment that gives spinach and other plants their verdant colour may improve doctors' ability to examine the human gastrointestinal tract. That's according to a study, published in the journal Advanced Materials, which describes how chlorophyll-based nanoparticles suspended in liquid are an effective imaging agent for the gut.
12th July 2016


A new way of looking at cancer

A new way of looking at cancer
Clusters of circulating cells commonly found in the blood of cancer patients have long been the subject of research on cancer. These clusters have been regarded for more than 50 years as malignant cells that have broken off from the primary tumour, spreading cancer to other parts of the body. 
8th July 2016

3D computer model will aid the personalisation of medicine

3D computer model will aid the personalisation of medicine
Human diseases are network diseases," said Eyleen O'Rourke, an assistant professor of biology and cell biology at the University of Virginia. By that she means that our genes, cells, tissues and organs all interact and affect each other as a highly complex network of entities that, in combination with the environment – defined as our diet, health habits and other factors – determine whether our bodies are affected by disease, and how they respond to the medications used to treat various disorders.
8th July 2016

Researchers solve the expensive vaccine chiller issue

Researchers solve the expensive vaccine chiller issue
  Vaccines against killer diseases from polio to hepatitis are fragile and can easily be made useless if they get too hot or too cold. The problem is particularly acute in the developing countries where nearly one in five of the world’s population – 1.3bn people – live without access to electricity.
6th July 2016

Microfluidic device tests electric fields on cancer cells

Microfluidic device tests electric fields on cancer cells
Researchers at MIT's research centre in Singapore have developed a microfluidic device that tests the effects of electric fields on cancer cells. They observed that a range of low-intensity, middle-frequency electric fields effectively stopped breast and lung cancer cells from growing and spreading, while having no adverse effect on neighboring healthy cells. The device is designed to help scientists narrow in on safe ranges of electric fields to noninvasively treat breast, lung, and other forms of cancer.
6th July 2016

Cadherin-11 helps scientists understand how tumour cells migrate

Cadherin-11 helps scientists understand how tumour cells migrate
  Cadherins are part of the protein family of adhesion molecules. Just like mortar between the bricks in a wall, they ensure that cells stay together, preventing them from breaking away and migrating from a group of cells. 
6th July 2016

NASA technology implemented in breast cancer research

NASA technology implemented in breast cancer research
Getting spacecraft ready for launch may have more to do with medical research than you think. For a study on microbes that may be associated with a history of breast cancer, researchers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, employed the same sequencing and analysis methods used for examining bacteria in spacecraft assembly rooms. Those techniques were designed for planetary protection—ensuring that NASA spacecraft do not contaminate other worlds.
27th June 2016

Cryogel model to further prostate cancer research

Cryogel model to further prostate cancer research
A team of researchers led by Dr. Friederike J. Gruhl and Professor Andrew C. B. Cato at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) are developing a three-dimensional model for prostate cancer research based on cryogels. The model will be used to reproduce natural processes and above all to examine the development and the progression of tumors.
27th June 2016


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