Research

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Method for textiles could help human tissue manufacturing

Method for textiles could help human tissue manufacturing
Elizabeth Loboa, dean of the MU College of Engineering, and her team recently tested methods to make the process of tissue engineering more cost effective and producible in larger quantities. Tissues could help patients suffering from wounds caused by diabetes and circulation disorders, patients in need of cartilage or bone repair and to women who have had mastectomies by replacing their breast tissue.
8th April 2016

Latest alternatives for personalised medicine

Latest alternatives for personalised medicine
Fraunhofer researchers have developed a particulary flexible additive manufacturing method that allows them to produce bone implants, dentures, surgical tools, or microreactors in almost any conceivable design. At the Medtec medical technology tradeshow in Stuttgart, the scientists from Dresden will show their research results. The small pharmaceutical plant next to the patient's bed is no bigger than a two euro coin.
7th April 2016

Helping humans realise their full regenerative potential

Helping humans realise their full regenerative potential
If you trace our evolutionary tree way back to its roots -- long before the shedding of gills or the development of opposable thumbs -- you will likely find a common ancestor with the amazing ability to regenerate lost body parts. Lucky descendants of this creature, including today’s salamanders or zebrafish, can still perform the feat, but humans lost much of their regenerative power over millions of years of evolution.
7th April 2016


The internet of vulnerable things

The internet of vulnerable things
Every year in Louisville, Kentucky, hackers and security experts gather for DerbyCon. While a get-together of hackers may sound troubling on its own, what’s truly disturbing is what came out of last year’s conference. Medical cyber crime is on the rise, and there are thousands of critical medical devices which can currently be located online and hacked directly. By Rob Phillips, sales and marketing director of Accutronics.
7th April 2016

Reducing risk factors

Reducing risk factors
All Programmable FPGAs and SoCs give medical device manufacturers the flexibility needed to satisfy stringent regulatory requirements and manage the design process efficiently. Aaron Behman, Director, Corporate Strategy & Marketing, Embedded Vision, Xilinx explains
5th April 2016

What are the risks in medical device design?

What are the risks in medical device design?
Jean-Louis Evans, Managing Director at TÜV SÜD Product Service, explains how legislation can keep pace with the fast evolution of medical technology. While medical technology evolves at a fast rate, traditionally test standards develop much more slowly. 
5th April 2016

How is the IoT improving healthcare?

How is the IoT improving healthcare?
The Internet of Things (IoT) has applications that range all the way from automated manufacturing, to controlling the temperature of residential air conditioners. One particular area where IoT is hugely beneficial is in the medical equipment industry.
5th April 2016

Illuminating the inner 'machines' of bacteria

Illuminating the inner 'machines' of bacteria
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have tracked how microscopic organisms called cyanobacteria make use of internal protein 'machines' to boost their ability to convert carbon dioxide into sugar during photosynthesis. With global food and energy security one of the greatest challenges of the 21st century, the new findings could help inform the design and engineering of new nanotechnologies to improve crop yields and biomass production.
31st March 2016

A way to improve effectiveness of antibiotics

Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, have discovered that antibiotics can continue to be effective if bacteria's cell-to-cell communication and ability to latch on to each other are disrupted. This research breakthrough is a major step forward in tackling the growing concern of antibiotic resistance, opening up new treatment options for doctors to help patients fight against chronic and persistent bacterial infections.
31st March 2016

Insights into tears could lead to comfortable contact lenses

Insights into tears could lead to comfortable contact lenses
When contact lenses work really well, you forget they are on your eyes. You might not feel the same at the end of a long day staring at a computer screen. After too many hours of wear, the lenses and your eyes dry out, causing irritation that might outweigh the convenience of contacts. Stanford researchers hope to alleviate this pain by both advancing the understanding of how natural tears keep our eyes comfortable, and developing a machine for designing better contact lenses.
23rd March 2016


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