Research

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AI helps detect cancer cells

AI helps detect cancer cells
Scientists at the California NanoSystems Institute at UCLA have developed a new technique for identifying cancer cells in blood samples faster and more accurately than the current standard methods. In one common approach to testing for cancer, doctors add biochemicals to blood samples. Those biochemicals attach biological "labels" to the cancer cells, and those labels enable instruments to detect and identify them.
14th April 2016

Computer-assisted approaches to combat Zika virus

Computer-assisted approaches to combat Zika virus
  The recent epidemic of Zika virus infections in South and Latin America has raised serious concerns on its ramifications for the population in the Americas and spread of the virus worldwide. The Zika virus disease is a relatively new phenomenon for which sufficient and comprehensive data and investigative reports have not been available to date.
11th April 2016

An extra layer for tumour-penetrating cancer medications

An extra layer for tumour-penetrating cancer medications
Nanoparticles are now being used to transport chemotherapy medicine through the bloodstream, to the doorstep of cancerous tumors. Drexel University researchers believe that the trick to gaining access to the pernicious cellular masses is to give the nanoparticles a new look - and that dressing to impress will be able to get them past the tumor's biological bouncers.
11th April 2016


The impact of digital medicine to the future

The impact of digital medicine to the future
Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are researching new digitally-assisted methods of treatment and approaches on how to handle big data in medicine - initial results are already being implemented in the operating theater. "Modern molecular medicine alone witnessed more data generated in 2015 than in the entire period from 1990 to 2005," explains Burkhard Rost, Professor of Bioinformatics at the TUM.
11th April 2016

Nanoparticles could treat intestinal inflammation

Nanoparticles could treat intestinal inflammation
Nanoparticles designed to block a cell-surface molecule that plays a key role in inflammation could be a safe treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University and Southwest University in China. The scientists developed nanoparticles, or microscopic particles, to reduce the expression of CD98, a glycoprotein that promotes inflammation. Their findings are published in the journal Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces.
8th April 2016

Method for textiles could help human tissue manufacturing

Method for textiles could help human tissue manufacturing
Elizabeth Loboa, dean of the MU College of Engineering, and her team recently tested methods to make the process of tissue engineering more cost effective and producible in larger quantities. Tissues could help patients suffering from wounds caused by diabetes and circulation disorders, patients in need of cartilage or bone repair and to women who have had mastectomies by replacing their breast tissue.
8th April 2016

Latest alternatives for personalised medicine

Latest alternatives for personalised medicine
Fraunhofer researchers have developed a particulary flexible additive manufacturing method that allows them to produce bone implants, dentures, surgical tools, or microreactors in almost any conceivable design. At the Medtec medical technology tradeshow in Stuttgart, the scientists from Dresden will show their research results. The small pharmaceutical plant next to the patient's bed is no bigger than a two euro coin.
7th April 2016

Helping humans realise their full regenerative potential

Helping humans realise their full regenerative potential
If you trace our evolutionary tree way back to its roots -- long before the shedding of gills or the development of opposable thumbs -- you will likely find a common ancestor with the amazing ability to regenerate lost body parts. Lucky descendants of this creature, including today’s salamanders or zebrafish, can still perform the feat, but humans lost much of their regenerative power over millions of years of evolution.
7th April 2016

The internet of vulnerable things

The internet of vulnerable things
Every year in Louisville, Kentucky, hackers and security experts gather for DerbyCon. While a get-together of hackers may sound troubling on its own, what’s truly disturbing is what came out of last year’s conference. Medical cyber crime is on the rise, and there are thousands of critical medical devices which can currently be located online and hacked directly. By Rob Phillips, sales and marketing director of Accutronics.
7th April 2016

Reducing risk factors

Reducing risk factors
All Programmable FPGAs and SoCs give medical device manufacturers the flexibility needed to satisfy stringent regulatory requirements and manage the design process efficiently. Aaron Behman, Director, Corporate Strategy & Marketing, Embedded Vision, Xilinx explains
5th April 2016


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