Research

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1.2 microseconds in the life of a HIV capsid

1.2 microseconds in the life of a HIV capsid
It took two years on a supercomputer to simulate 1.2 microseconds in the life of the HIV capsid, a protein cage that shuttles the HIV virus to the nucleus of a human cell. The 64-million-atom simulation offers new insights into how the virus senses its environment and completes its infective cycle. The findings are reported in the journal Nature Communications.
19th July 2017

Independent brain activation patterns in bilingual people

Independent brain activation patterns in bilingual people
A team of researchers from China and the U.S. has found independent brain activation patterns in bilingual people when they switch between languages. In their paper published in Science Advances, the group explains how they used a two-pronged approach to learn more about how the brain allows people to speak in more than one language. Scientists have long been intrigued by the brain's ability to learn more than one language—perhaps equally intriguing is the ability of the brain to instantly switch between languages.
13th July 2017

Ensuring that medical trainers are not out on a limb

Ensuring that medical trainers are not out on a limb
Providing anatomically accurate and procedurally correct models used in training the next generation of medical practitioners, Limbs and Things has recently turned to band saw specialist Starrett for support. We all know that it takes a lot of dedication to choose a career in medicine. To become a GP takes around five years of further training on top of a medical degree, and to become a hospital consultant it can take between seven and nine years. Therefore, Limbs and Things provide vital services to this training process.
13th July 2017


Solution reverses antibiotic drug resistance

Solution reverses antibiotic drug resistance
Cancer researchers in the UK may have stumbled across a solution to reverse antibiotic drug resistance and stop infections like MRSA. Experts warn we are decades behind in the race against superbugs having already exploited naturally occurring antibiotics, with the creation of new ones requiring time, money and ingenuity. But a team of scientists at the University of Salford say they may have found a very simple way forward – even though they weren't even looking for antibiotics.
13th July 2017

Antibody against carcinogenic substance deciphered

Antibody against carcinogenic substance deciphered
A team led by Prof. Arne Skerra from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has deciphered the binding mechanism of an antibody to benzopyrene — a discovery that could pave the way for an easier method to identify and, hence, remove the toxin. During the incomplete combustion of organic substances polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are created. The most well-known of these substances is benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) due to its high toxicity and its facile identification.
12th July 2017

Researchers establish mechanism controlling cell division

Researchers establish mechanism controlling cell division
Researchers at the Francis Crick and Gurdon Institutes have pinpointed the mechanism that activates a key point in embryonic development. This could help scientists develop treatments for diseases where the cell cycle is disrupted, such as cancer. The earliest stages of development in many animals happen very quickly. There is a rapid expansion in the number of cells that make up the embryo structure known as the blastula.
11th July 2017

Technique unveils core of tissues and tumours

Technique unveils core of tissues and tumours
Scientists from the Biotech Research & Innovation Centre (BRIC) at the University of Copenhagen have developed a method to reveal the structure of tissues and tumours with unprecedented detail, by completely dissolving away cells and leaving the delicate extracellular matrix intact. The matrix surrounds the cells in every organ of our bodies, and provides shape and structure to the organ.
28th June 2017

Radiation-exposed corals may hold insights on cancer

Radiation-exposed corals may hold insights on cancer
More than 70 years after the U.S. tested atomic bombs on a ring of sand in the Pacific Ocean called Bikini Atoll, Stanford researchers are studying how long-term radiation exposure there has affected corals that normally grow for centuries without developing cancer. The researchers’ work is featured in an episode of “Big Pacific,” a five-week PBS series about species, natural phenomena and behaviors of the Pacific Ocean.
28th June 2017

Cellular 'guillotine' helps understand how single cells heal

Cellular 'guillotine' helps understand how single cells heal
While doing research at the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts, Sindy Tang learned of a remarkable organism: Stentor coeruleus. It’s a single-celled, free-living freshwater organism, shaped like a trumpet and big enough to see with the naked eye. And, to Tang’s amazement, if cut in half it can heal itself into two healthy cells. Tang, who is an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford University, knew right away that she had to study this incredible ability.
27th June 2017

Boosting quality of patient MRIs unveil stroke outcomes

Boosting quality of patient MRIs unveil stroke outcomes
  People who suffer a stroke often undergo a brain scan at the hospital, allowing doctors to determine the location and extent of the damage. Researchers who study the effects of strokes would love to be able to analyse these images, but the resolution is often too low for many analyses.
23rd June 2017


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