Research

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Printing the human body

The global 3D bioprinting market is projected to reach $1,332m by 2021 from an estimated $411.4m in 2016, at a CAGR of 26.5%.
16th August 2017

Magnetic fields destroy bacteria on artificial joints

Magnetic fields destroy bacteria on artificial joints
A short exposure to an alternating magnetic field might someday replace multiple surgeries and weeks of IV antibiotics as treatment for stubborn infections on artificial joints, new research suggests. Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have shown that high-frequency alternating magnetic fields – the same principle used in induction cooktops – can be used to destroy bacteria that are encased in a slimy 'biofilm' growing on a metal surface.
9th August 2017

Research unveils why patients with shingles feel pain

Research unveils why patients with shingles feel pain
  Chickenpox is a typical childhood illness. In most cases, it is benign, and the symptoms disappear within ten days. However, its causative agent, Varicella zoster virus (VZV), remains in the organism forever. In some cases, the virus can be reactivated years later, causing a different disease known as herpes zoster, or shingles.
9th August 2017


Ultrafast method determines antibiotic resistance

Ultrafast method determines antibiotic resistance
Researchers at Uppsala University have developed a new method for very rapidly determining whether infection-causing bacteria are resistant or susceptible to antibiotics. The findings have now been published in the US journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Antibiotic resistance is a growing medical problem that threatens human health globally. One important contributory factor in the development of resistance is the incorrect use of antibiotics for treatment.
9th August 2017

How do you recover from a wounded heart?

How do you recover from a wounded heart?
Some people are better than others at recovering from a wounded heart, according to a USC Stem Cell study published in Nature Genetics. In the study, first author Michaela Patterson, a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Henry Sucov, and her colleagues focused on a regenerative type of heart muscle cell called a mononuclear diploid cardiomyocyte (MNDCM).
8th August 2017

Big data shows unexpected connections between diseases

Big data shows unexpected connections between diseases
Using health insurance claims data from more than 480,000 people in nearly 130,000 families, researchers at the University of Chicago have created a classification of common diseases based on how often they occur among genetically-related individuals. Researchers hope the work, published in Nature Genetics, will help physicians make better diagnoses and treat root causes instead of symptoms.
8th August 2017

Lab study prevents protein clumping

Lab study prevents protein clumping
Scientists report in a new study that by imitating a natural process of cells, they prevented the formation of protein clumps associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia. In lab cultures of human and yeast cells, the scientists stopped the harmful clumping of FUS proteins by exposing them to phosphorylation, a process that makes precise changes to the amino acid building blocks of proteins, increasing their negative electric charge.
8th August 2017

How to reprogram cells in the immune system

How to reprogram cells in the immune system
When the immune system is imbalanced, either due to overly-active cells or cells that suppress its function, it causes a wide range of diseases, from psoriasis to cancer. By manipulating the function of certain immune cells, called T cells, researchers could help restore the system's balance and create new treatments to target these diseases. Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes revealed, for the first time, a method to reprogram specific T cells.
3rd August 2017

The importance of genetic noise in cell development

The importance of genetic noise in cell development
Random differences between cells early in development could be the key to making different cells in the body, according to new research from a team co-led by Professor Wolf Reik. Different cell types - brain, blood, skin, gut etc. - all have unique and vital roles, yet they all start out the same. Cells become different as a result of a long sequence of biochemical choices made before we're born. For us to be healthy, these choices need to ensure we get the right number of each cell type.
2nd August 2017

Nervous system cells help research on degenerative diseases

Nervous system cells help research on degenerative diseases
Microglia are the primary immune cells of the central nervous system, with functions similar to those of white blood cells, especially in actively defending the brain and spinal cord. The results of collaborative research by Brazilian and Dutch scientists on the main genes expressed by human microglia have just been published in Nature Neuroscience.
2nd August 2017


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