Research

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Why the FDA should increase regulations on 'filtered' cigarettes

Why the FDA should increase regulations on 'filtered' cigarettes
A study shows that so-called 'light' cigarettes have no health benefits to smokers and have likely contributed to the rise of a certain form of lung cancer that occurs deep in the lungs. For this new study, researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute and five other universities/cancer centers examined why the most common type of lung cancer, called adenocarcinoma, has increased over the last 50 years.
22nd May 2017

Mislocalised calcium channel causes insulin secretion defect

Researchers from Uppsala University have studied beta cells of type-2 diabetic donors, and find that a mislocalised calcium channel contributes to the failed insulin secretion associated with the disease. After a meal, the blood sugar rises. To counteract this and to make the sugar available to the body, specialised cells in the pancreas get activated to secrete insulin. In people with diabetes this mechanism fails, which leads to elevated blood sugar and a host of other diabetes related complications.
19th May 2017

Resistance to malaria linked to human red blood cell receptors

Resistance to malaria linked to human red blood cell receptors
Researchers have discovered that protection from the most severe form of malaria is linked with natural variation in human red blood cell genes. A study from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics and their collaborators has identified a genetic rearrangement of red blood cell glycophorin receptors that confers a 40 per cent reduced risk from severe malaria.
19th May 2017


Brain network offers clues to social cognition

Brain network offers clues to social cognition
Scientists call our ability to understand another person's thoughts - to intuit their desires, read their intentions, and predict their behaviour - theory of mind. It's an essential human trait, one that is crucial to effective social interaction. But where did it come from? Working with rhesus macaque monkeys, researchers in Winrich Freiwald's Laboratory of Neural Systems at The Rockefeller University have discovered tantalising clues about the origins of our ability to understand what other people are thinking.
19th May 2017

Replicating the patient's blood-brain barrier in the lab dish

Replicating the patient's blood-brain barrier in the lab dish
  The blood-brain barrier is biology's proverbial double-edged sword. An impermeable shield of endothelial cells that protects our brains from toxins and other threats that may lurk in circulating blood, the barrier can also exclude therapeutic drugs and, at times, essential biomolecules required for healthy brain development.
17th May 2017

Levels of biomarker linked to increased stroke risk for women

Women with elevated levels of a protein in their blood may be at a higher risk of ischemic stroke, according to a study published in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The new research comes in time for Stroke Awareness Month in May. The study found that an elevated level of beta-2 microglobulin, a protein found on the surface of many cells, was linked to an increased risk of ischemic stroke among women.
15th May 2017

Cell Atlas study reveals insights into human biology

Cell Atlas study reveals insights into human biology
The first analysis of the physical arrangement of proteins in cells was published in Science, revealing that a large portion of human proteins can be found in more than one location in a given cell. Using the Sweden-based Cell Atlas, researchers examined the spatial distribution of the human proteome that correspond to the majority of protein-coding genes, and they described in unprecedented detail the distribution of proteins to the various organelles and substructures of the human body’s smallest unit, the cell.
12th May 2017

Cannabis can reverse aging processes in the brain

Cannabis can reverse aging processes in the brain
Memory performance decreases with increasing age. Cannabis can reverse these ageing processes in the brain. This was shown in mice by scientists at the University of Bonn with their colleagues at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Old animals were able to regress to the state of two-month-old mice with a prolonged low-dose treatment with a cannabis active ingredient. This opens up options, for instance, when it comes to treating dementia. The results are presented in the journal Nature Medicine.
10th May 2017

Malaria mechanism gives hope to pregnant women

Resistance to malaria drugs means that pregnant women are unable to overcome the anaemia caused by the malaria parasite – and their babies are born undersized. A study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Uppsala University however, exposes the effects of malaria in pregnant women and shows how the PTEF protein is central to the infection. The study opens the way for new malaria drugs.
9th May 2017

Defence mechanism against bacteria discovered

  Researchers in dermatology at Lund University in Sweden believe they have cracked the mystery of why we are able to quickly prevent an infection from spreading uncontrollably in the body during wounding. They believe this knowledge may be of clinical significance for developing new ways to counteract bacteria.
8th May 2017


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LASER World of PHOTONICS 2017
26th June 2017
Germany Messe Munchen