Prophylaxis

Displaying 31 - 40 of 49

HIV sensor helps screening in poorer places

HIV sensor helps screening in poorer places
At the Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid, researchers have developed a tiny, cheap, portable sensor potentially capable of detecting HIV in people within a week of infection. These days nucleic acid amplification is the clinical standard, but it’s too expensive for many places around the world. Besides preventing early detection, not being able to screen blood for HIV hampers blood donation efforts.
22nd February 2017

The world’s first app to be approved for contraception

The world’s first app to be approved for contraception
As of today, women across Europe now have a new, regulatory approved, contraception to choose from - an app. Natural Cycles, the fertility tracking app that uses a smart algorithm to help women pinpoint their fertility, has become the world’s first app to be approved specifically for contraception. Tüv Süd, one of the leading notified bodies worldwide, approved Natural Cycles as a class IIb medical device intended to be used for contraception.
9th February 2017

Smart insulin-pen cap enables dosage data tracking

Smart insulin-pen cap enables dosage data tracking
MIT spinout Common Sensing aims to solve the nation’s diabetes-management issues by going digital. The startup’s smart insulin-pen cap logs insulin intake data on an app and in the cloud, to help patients better manage their regimen. Moreover, the cap gives doctors a detailed view into patients’ insulin habits and how they affect blood-glucose levels, for more targeted care. Invented by co-founders James White ’10, SM ’12 and Richard Whalley ’10, the Gocap is now going through clinical studies to test its viability.
17th November 2016


Preventing free radicals to help ageing

Preventing free radicals to help ageing
Researchers have found out how a particularly dangerous type of free radicals is formed, and it may lead to a better understanding of ageing. Free radicals destroy our cells, all human organisms are attacked by them and over times they contribute to us ageing. Every time we breathe we bring crucial oxygen into the body. 
4th October 2016

Putting health at the top of the agenda

Putting health at the top of the agenda
Emma Segelov, Marketing Manager for MK Electric (a Honeywell company), explains the growing importance of specifying anti-bacterial devices in hospitals to prevent the growing risk of infection.
17th August 2016

Enzyme-mapping helps target neglected diseases

Enzyme-mapping helps target neglected diseases
Scientists at MIT and the University of São Paulo in Brazil have identified the structure of an enzyme that could be a good target for drugs combating three diseases common in the developing world. The enzyme, fumarate hydratase (FH) is essential for metabolic processes of parasites that are responsible for the spread of three diseases: Leishmaniases, Chagas disease, and sleeping sickness.
16th August 2016

A way to enable rapid screening of anti-cancer compounds

A way to enable rapid screening of anti-cancer compounds
A chemistry graduate student at UChicago, Di Liu devised a way to make tiny knotted and interlocked chemical structures that have been impossible for chemists to fabricate until now, and he invented a way that those knots might be used to quickly screen hundreds of chemicals for fighting cancer. Many chemicals have knots or links as part of their structure. But synthesising new substances that tie themselves in knots at the molecular scale is prodigiously difficult.
12th August 2016

Biomarkers may predict early Alzheimer's disease

University of Wisconsin-Madison Alzheimer’s researchers have identified a scientific approach that may help predict which older adults are more likely to develop cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease well before the onset of dementia. This approach – which statistically analyses a panel of biomarkers – could help identify people most likely to benefit from drugs or other interventions to slow the progress of the disease. The study was published in the August edition of the journal Brain.
2nd August 2016

Pokémon GO could ease Type 2 diabetes burden

Pokémon GO could ease Type 2 diabetes burden
Leading diabetes researchers believe the smartphone craze Pokémon GO could be an 'innovative solution' to rising obesity levels and chronic disease. Millions of people around the world have started to play Pokémon GO, a virtual reality treasure hunt where players must walk to places within the real world and catch, train and battle monsters which appear on their mobile phone screens.
25th July 2016

3D VR Colonoscopy allows better colorectal cancer prevention

3D VR Colonoscopy allows better colorectal cancer prevention
At UCSF's 3D Imaging Lab, radiologist Judy Yee, MD, pulls up an image that looks more like a birthday party balloon animal than a patient's colon: a vibrant, color-segmented tube, torqued and twisted in on itself. Created from thin slices of a CT scan, the image appears in 3D on the flat screen. It can even morph into video "fly-through" views, enhancing polyps, lesions, and other precancerous anomalies.
6th July 2016


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SPS IPC Drives 2017
28th November 2017
Germany Nuremberg
Cyber Security - Oil, Gas, Power 2017
29th November 2017
United Kingdom London
AI Tech World
29th November 2017
United Kingdom Olymipa, London
Maker Faire 2017
1st December 2017
Italy Rome
Virtual & Augmented Reality Creative Summit 2017
5th December 2017
United Kingdom Picturehouse Central, London