Prophylaxis

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Protein could increase effectiveness of vaccines

Protein could increase effectiveness of vaccines
Researchers have discovered a protein they believe would help make vaccinations more effective and provide protection from other diseases such as cancer. The findings, which appear online in Scientific Reports, allows for greater understanding of how vaccine enhancers work and can best be used. Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) purified a protein found on the exterior of bacteria (neisseria meningidis) and used it as an accessary to provide a better vaccination response.
7th April 2017

Pet exposure may prevent allergy and obesity

Pet exposure may prevent allergy and obesity
  If you need a reason to become a dog lover, how about their ability to help protect kids from allergies and obesity? A new University of Alberta study showed that babies from families with pets - 70% of which were dogs - showed higher levels of two types of microbes associated with lower risks of allergic disease and obesity.
7th April 2017

Mapping pathways to protective antibodies for HIV vaccine

Mapping pathways to protective antibodies for HIV vaccine
A Duke Health-led research team has described both the pathway of HIV protective antibody development and a synthetic HIV outer envelope mimic that has the potential to induce the antibodies with vaccination. "A goal for an HIV-1 vaccine is to induce broadly neutralising antibodies," said senior author Barton F. Haynes, M.D., director of the Duke Human Vaccine Institute (DHVI).
16th March 2017


Method produces leading anti-malarial drug

Method produces leading anti-malarial drug
  Researchers at Cardiff University have devised a new way of creating a drug commonly used as the first line of defence against malaria around the world. Artemisinin is a drug recommended by the World Health Organisation for treatment of all cases of severe malaria and works by attacking all stages of the malaria parasite in the blood.
15th March 2017

Oral delivery system could make vaccinations needle-free

Oral delivery system could make vaccinations needle-free
Patients could one day self-administer vaccines using a needleless, pill-sized technology that jet-releases a stream of vaccine inside the mouth, according to a proof-of-concept study conducted at UC Berkeley. The study did not test vaccine delivery in people, but demonstrated that the technology, called MucoJet, is capable of delivering vaccine-sized molecules to immune cells in the mouths of animals.
13th March 2017

Scaffolds covered in stem cells could prevent osteomyelitis

Scaffolds covered in stem cells could prevent osteomyelitis
Bone infections are often very difficult to treat, and with the rise of MRSA this issue has become only more challenging. A team of researchers from University of Missouri, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University, and Silpakorn University in Thailand has developed a way of making tissue scaffolds that ward off MRSA while promoting natural healing at the site of their implantation.
27th February 2017

HIV sensor helps screening in poorer places

HIV sensor helps screening in poorer places
At the Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid, researchers have developed a tiny, cheap, portable sensor potentially capable of detecting HIV in people within a week of infection. These days nucleic acid amplification is the clinical standard, but it’s too expensive for many places around the world. Besides preventing early detection, not being able to screen blood for HIV hampers blood donation efforts.
22nd February 2017

The world’s first app to be approved for contraception

The world’s first app to be approved for contraception
As of today, women across Europe now have a new, regulatory approved, contraception to choose from - an app. Natural Cycles, the fertility tracking app that uses a smart algorithm to help women pinpoint their fertility, has become the world’s first app to be approved specifically for contraception. Tüv Süd, one of the leading notified bodies worldwide, approved Natural Cycles as a class IIb medical device intended to be used for contraception.
9th February 2017

Researchers solve the expensive vaccine chiller issue

Researchers solve the expensive vaccine chiller issue
  Vaccines against killer diseases from polio to hepatitis are fragile and can easily be made useless if they get too hot or too cold. The problem is particularly acute in the developing countries where nearly one in five of the world’s population – 1.3bn people – live without access to electricity.
6th July 2016

E. coli-based transport capsule enables next-gen vaccines

E. coli-based transport capsule enables next-gen vaccines
Researchers experimenting with harmless strains of E. coli are working toward developing an E. coli-based transport capsule designed to help next-gen vaccines do a more efficient and effective job than today's immunisations. The research, described in a study published in the journal Science Advances, highlights the capsule's success in fighting pneumococcal disease, an infection that can result in pneumonia, sepsis, ear infections and meningitis.
5th July 2016


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LASER World of PHOTONICS 2017
26th June 2017
Germany Messe Munchen