Optomedical

Displaying 61 - 70 of 71

Google Glass could help autistic children read emotions

Google Glass could help autistic children read emotions
Like many autistic children, Julian Brown has trouble reading emotions in people's faces, one of the challenging conditions of the neurological disorder. Now the 10-year-old San Jose boy is getting help from an experimental device that records and analyses faces in real time and alerts him to the emotions they're expressing. The facial recognition software was developed at Stanford University and runs on Google Glass, a computerised headset with a front-facing camera and a tiny display just above the right eye.
23rd June 2016

Multiphoton microscope speeds up disease diagnosis

Multiphoton microscope speeds up disease diagnosis
Two optical devices could reduce the need to take tissue samples during medical examinations and operations and to then send them for testing – potentially speeding up diagnosis and treatment and cutting healthcare costs. One is a lightweight handheld microscope designed to examine external tissue or tissue exposed during surgery. One example of its use could be to help surgeons compare normal and cancerous cells (during an operation).
24th May 2016

Components attracting attention

Components attracting attention
Imaging systems represent the largest sector of the medical electronics industry. Among the range of imaging modalities in continuing development, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners are one of the most significant, as Knowles explain.
5th April 2016


Startup develops eyeglasses that can focus themselves

Startup develops eyeglasses that can focus themselves
An Israeli startup is making glasses with lenses that can automatically adjust their optical power in real time, which may be a boom to people with age-related trouble focusing on nearby objects and could also be helpful for making VR less nauseating. Called Deep Optics, the startup has spent the last three years building lenses with a see-through liquid-crystal layer that can change its refractive index.
10th March 2016

Contact lenses slow the advancement of myopia

Contact lenses slow the advancement of myopia
Progressive contact lenses which actually slow the advancement of myopia, or near-sightedness, have been developed by Dr. Jaume Pauné of the Universitat Politècninca de Catalunya (UPC). The reduction in the onset of myopia was registered at as high as 43%, measuring a difference in increase of between three and five dioptres. The technology is unique in that the lenses are designed to influence one's peripheral vision and do not use a bifocal system, as conventional lenses do.
9th March 2016

Scanning technology benefits diabetic eye care

In a national clinical trial led by Joslin Diabetes Center's Beetham Eye Institute, ultrawide field (UWF) scanning technology significantly improved the ability of experts at a remote central location to identify diabetic retinopathy in a patient, and to judge whether the eye disease warranted referring the patient to an ophthalmologist for further care. The national trial confirms findings of earlier research on Beetham patients with UWF imaging, says Paolo Silva, M.D., staff ophthalmologist and assistant chief of telemedicine.
9th March 2016

Fibre-optic technology could heal wounds faster

Fibre-optic technology could heal wounds faster
A new technique which delivers light deeper into human tissue than previously possible has been developed by researchers at the University of St Andrews and Harvard Medical School. The new method, published in the journal Nature Communications, could help heal wounds faster and treat tumours more efficiently. Through a process called photochemical tissue bonding, light is applied to a wound to stimulate healing.
10th February 2016

Light-activated nanoparticles kill 'superbugs'

Light-activated nanoparticles kill 'superbugs'
In the ever-escalating evolutionary battle with drug-resistant bacteria, humans may soon have a leg up thanks to adaptive, light-activated nanotherapy developed by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as Salmonella, E. Coli and Staphylococcus infect some 2m people and kill at least 23,000 people in the United States each year.
21st January 2016

New developments in optical fibres for medical applications

New developments in optical fibres for medical applications
The variety of wavelengths and the high optical powers required create many of the demands in medical and industrial applications. Laser Components can provide a wide range of fibre types including sapphire for Er:YAG lasers and hollow core for infrared wavelengths, as well as a range of silica and plastic optical fibres.
4th January 2016

Xbox Kinect reduces radiation exposure from X-rays

Xbox Kinect reduces radiation exposure from X-rays
With the aim of producing high-quality X-rays with minimal radiation exposure, particularly in children, researchers have developed a new approach to imaging patients. Surprisingly, the new technology isn’t a high-tech, high-dollar piece of machinery. Rather, it’s based on the Xbox gaming system.
2nd December 2015


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