Optomedical

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Project aiming to advance medical imaging

 Project aiming to advance medical imaging
As medical imaging is becoming increasingly important, an EU-China network has been established in order to overcome the challenge of storing and retrieving these images. Searching archives of digital images using text descriptors is like trying to find a needle in a haystack. This phenomenon also applies to medical imaging. 
3rd January 2017

Tool uses UV light to control inflammation

Tool uses UV light to control inflammation
Black light does more than make posters glow. Cornell researchers have developed a chemical tool to control inflammation that is activated by ultraviolet (UV) light. The method will allow scientists to study inflammation and the immune system, and may one day prove effective as a targeted therapy for inflammatory diseases, while minimising side effects to healthy tissues.
23rd November 2016

3D imaging technique maps migration of DNA-carrying material

3D imaging technique maps migration of DNA-carrying material
Scientists have mapped the reorganisation of genetic material that takes place when a stem cell matures into a nerve cell. Detailed 3D visualisations show an unexpected connectivity in the genetic material in a cell's nucleus, and provide a new understanding of a cell's evolving architecture. These unique 3D reconstructions of mouse olfactory cells, which govern the sense of smell, were obtained using X-ray imaging tools at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).
18th November 2016


3D video with intelligent software monitors sleep disorders

The usual method of recording periodic leg movements in sleep for people with sleep disorders is to use electromyography (EMG), an electrophysiological method used in neurological diagnosis that measures muscle activity. However, the cables that this method requires can interfere with the patient's sleep and electrodes can become detached, thereby compromising the quality of the data.
17th November 2016

Safer X-ray diagnosis created through hi-res detectors

Safer X-ray diagnosis created through hi-res detectors
The NHS recorded over 22 million X-rays in England last year, and they are a diagnostic test that most of us are familiar with. Scientists have often sought to reduce harmful ionising radiation, the high-energy particles that penetrate tissue to reveal internal organs and bone structures that can damage DNA, from single x-ray records or CT scans.
3rd November 2016

Imaging probe for fast and sensitive detection of cancer

Imaging probe for fast and sensitive detection of cancer
The ultimate goal of cancer diagnostics is to develop sensitive imaging techniques for reliable detection of tumor malignancy in the body. Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have come close to achieving this goal by developing an injectable imaging probe that can specifically detect solid tumors based on the activity of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system.
21st October 2016

4D imaging lowers risk of stroke

4D imaging lowers risk of stroke
  The most common form of cardiac arrhythmia is atrial fibrillation, which affects 33.5 million patients worldwide. As if having an irregular heartbeat wasn't troubling enough, patients with atrial fibrillation are also much more likely to have a stroke.
10th October 2016

Imaging technique in Alzheimer’s disease

Imaging technique in Alzheimer’s disease
  Tau PET is a promising imaging method for Alzheimer’s disease. A case study from Lund University in Sweden now confirms that tau PET images correspond to a higher degree to actual changes in the brain. According to the researchers behind the study, this increases opportunities for developing effective drugs.
28th September 2016

Scanning technique produces high-res 3D images of bones

Chemists from Trinity College Dublin, in collaboration with RCSI, have devised a revolutionary scanning technique that produces extremely high-res 3D images of bones - without exposing patients to X-ray radiation. The chemists attach luminescent compounds to tiny gold structures to form biologically safe 'nanoagents' that are attracted to calcium-rich surfaces, which appear when bones crack - even at a micro level.
9th September 2016

Ultrasound jump-starts man's brain after coma

Ultrasound jump-starts man's brain after coma
A 25-year-old man recovering from a coma has made remarkable progress following a treatment at UCLA to jump-start his brain using ultrasound. The technique uses sonic stimulation to excite the neurons in the thalamus, an egg-shaped structure that serves as the brain's central hub for processing information. "It's almost as if we were jump-starting the neurons back into function," said Martin Monti, the study's lead author and a UCLA associate professor of psychology and neurosurgery.
25th August 2016


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