Optomedical

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Scanning technique produces high-res 3D images of bones

Chemists from Trinity College Dublin, in collaboration with RCSI, have devised a revolutionary scanning technique that produces extremely high-res 3D images of bones - without exposing patients to X-ray radiation. The chemists attach luminescent compounds to tiny gold structures to form biologically safe 'nanoagents' that are attracted to calcium-rich surfaces, which appear when bones crack - even at a micro level.
9th September 2016

Ultrasound jump-starts man's brain after coma

Ultrasound jump-starts man's brain after coma
A 25-year-old man recovering from a coma has made remarkable progress following a treatment at UCLA to jump-start his brain using ultrasound. The technique uses sonic stimulation to excite the neurons in the thalamus, an egg-shaped structure that serves as the brain's central hub for processing information. "It's almost as if we were jump-starting the neurons back into function," said Martin Monti, the study's lead author and a UCLA associate professor of psychology and neurosurgery.
25th August 2016

Ultrasound increases visibility of radiation in cancerous tissue

Ultrasound increases visibility of radiation in cancerous tissue
  Using ultrasound technology, physicists from the Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics make proton radiation in cancerous tissue visible. In future, the irradiation of tumors with protons could become more precise.
23rd August 2016


Compact microscope can reduce blood poisoning deaths

Compact microscope can reduce blood poisoning deaths
Dubbed the ‘silent killer’, and more commonly known as ‘blood poisoning’, Sepsis is a whole-body inflammatory reaction that kills over 20,000 people per day worldwide, striking regardless of age, gender or fitness and killing more people than prostate cancer, breast cancer and HIV/AIDS combined. It is estimated that 44,000 people die every year from Sepsis in the UK alone.
22nd August 2016

Improving imaging resolution of the brain

Improving imaging resolution of the brain
Nowadays, characterisation of biological processes necessitates investigation at the single molecule level, and hence sensitive imaging techniques. To achieve this, a European team used nanoparticles as imaging probes for receptors in the brain. In the nervous system, neurons communicate with each other or with other cell types through specialised structures known as synapses.
18th August 2016

MRI technique enables consistent diagnoses

MRI technique enables consistent diagnoses
A technology harnesses imperfections that typically compromise MRI exams to create images resolved enough to enable consistent diagnoses across populations for the first time. These are findings of a study led by NYU Langone Medical Center and published in Nature Communications. Since its emergence in the 1970s, MRI has given physicians a better look inside tissues, helping to diagnose maladies from brain tumors to internal bleeding to torn ligaments.
16th August 2016

Handheld device captures images with cellular resolution

Handheld device captures images with cellular resolution
  Engineers and physicians at Duke University have developed a handheld device capable of capturing images of a retina with cellular resolution. The probe will allow researchers to gather detailed structural information about the eyes of infants and toddlers for the first time.
2nd August 2016

SPR devices detect molecules within a few hundred nanometres

Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) devices are the benchmark in optical sensing. They are used for detecting biomarkers of disease, discovering drugs, analysing chemicals, ensuring food quality and safety, and detecting pollutants in our environment. SPR devices can detect molecules within a few hundred nanometres of their metal surfaces.
1st August 2016

Enabling the visualisation of oxygen in tissue

Enabling the visualisation of oxygen in tissue
Learning how to look inside a body without having to cut it open is still an important part of medical research. One of the great challenges in imaging remains the visualisation of oxygen in tissue. A team led by Prof. Vasilis Ntziachristos, Chair for Biological Imaging at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Director of the Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging at the Helmholtz Centre in Munich, has developed an approach to this task.
29th July 2016

Helping the visually impaired to navigate safely

Helping the visually impaired to navigate safely
A recently launched project aimed at developing and testing a portable, electronic assistance system that will greatly extend the range of motion for the visually impaired, will receive €1.7m funding from The Federal Ministry of Education and Research.
28th July 2016


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EPE 2017 ECCE Europe
11th September 2017
Poland Warsaw
DSEI 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom ExCeL, London
RWM 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom NEC, Birmingham
Productronica India 2017
14th September 2017
India Pragati Maidan, New Delhi
Industry of Things World 2017
18th September 2017
Germany Berlin Congress Center