Optomedical

Displaying 1 - 10 of 93

First whole-brain map shows key to forming memories

First whole-brain map shows key to forming memories
A team of neuroscientists at the University of Pennsylvania has constructed the first whole-brain map of electrical connectivity in the brain based on data from nearly 300 neurosurgical patients with electrodes implanted directly on the brain. The researchers found that low-frequency rhythms of brain activity, when brain waves move up and down slowly, primarily drive communication between the frontal, temporal and medial temporal lobes, key brain regions that engage during memory processing.
23rd November 2017

Quantum dots light up tumours in bright technicolor

Quantum dots light up tumours in bright technicolor
A simple way to harness the incredible brightness of quantum dots—tiny fluorescent semiconductor crystals—and realise highly sensitive molecular imaging of cancer cells and other biomedical targets has been developed by researchers at RIKEN. Previous research has shown that pairing quantum dots with antibodies can turn them into molecular imaging probes. In the body’s immune system, antibodies recognise and stick to specific molecules on the surfaces of invading cells.
21st November 2017

Monitoring coolant flow to industrial and medical lasers

Monitoring coolant flow to industrial and medical lasers
Used in thousands of industrial and medical laser installations, the Titan Enterprises 800 Series turbine flowmeter is a monitoring device that ensures accurate and repeatable long-term operation. There are many applications of industrial and medical lasers. Whether used for cutting, welding, micro-machining, cosmetic or eye surgery - lasers generate a significant amount of heat.
20th November 2017


Ultrafast light pulses can trigger neuron activity

Ultrafast light pulses can trigger neuron activity
Specially tailored, ultrafast pulses of light can trigger neurons to fire and could one day help patients with light-sensitive circadian or mood problems, according to a new study in mice at the University of Illinois. Chemists have used such carefully crafted light beams, called coherent control, to regulate chemical reactions, but this study is the first demonstration of using them to control function in a living cell.
20th November 2017

LEDs light the way for optimised drug therapies

LEDs light the way for optimised drug therapies
Radioactivity may have a bad rap, but it plays a critical role in medical research. A revolutionary new technique to create radioactive molecules, pioneered in the lab of Princeton chemistry professor David MacMillan, has the potential to bring new medicines to patients much faster than before. “Your average drug takes 12 to 14 years to come to market,” said MacMillan, the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor of Chemistry.
16th November 2017

High speed video recording captures blood cell velocity

High speed video recording captures blood cell velocity
Scientists from ITMO University created a high-speed video capillaroscopy system that enables direct measurement of red blood cell velocity. Coupled with sophisticated software, the system can raise the accuracy of vascular condition assessment. Such a system can come in useful for monitoring how efficient certain therapies are. The results of the research were published in Optics and Engineering.
16th November 2017

Mirrors improve imaging of biological specimens

Mirrors improve imaging of biological specimens
  Researchers from the National Institutes of Health and the University of Chicago have improved the speed, resolution, and light efficiency of an optical microscope by switching from a conventional glass coverslip to a reflective, mirrored coverslip and applying new computer algorithms to process the resulting data.
15th November 2017

Portable spectrometer supports biological sample imaging anywhere

Portable spectrometer supports biological sample imaging anywhere
Spectral images, which contain more colour information than is obtainable with a typical camera, reveal characteristics of tissue and other biological samples that can’t be seen by the naked eye. A new smartphone-compatible device that is held like a pencil could make it practical to acquire spectral images of everyday objects and may eventually be used for point-of-care medical diagnosis in remote locations.
15th November 2017

Proteome of the human heart mapped for the first time

Proteome of the human heart mapped for the first time
A healthy heart beats about two billion times during a lifetime – thanks to the interplay of more than 10,000 proteins. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) and the German Heart Centre at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now determined which and how many individual proteins are present in each type of cell that occurs in the heart. In doing so, they compiled the first atlas of the healthy human heart, known as the cardiac proteome.
14th November 2017

Nano-CT device successfully tested

Nano-CT device successfully tested
Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht the researchers analysed the locomotory system of a velvet worm.
7th November 2017


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SPS IPC Drives 2017
28th November 2017
Germany Nuremberg
Cyber Security - Oil, Gas, Power 2017
29th November 2017
United Kingdom London
AI Tech World
29th November 2017
United Kingdom Olymipa, London
Maker Faire 2017
1st December 2017
Italy Rome
Virtual & Augmented Reality Creative Summit 2017
5th December 2017
United Kingdom Picturehouse Central, London