Optomedical

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Lowering the cost of medical laser cooling

Lowering the cost of medical laser cooling
In order to keep laser optics stable and at peak operating performance, Laird has introduced thermoelectric modules (TEMs) and thermoelectric assemblies (TEAs), which control the operating temperature of the medical laser to within defined parameters.
19th April 2017

Tissue expansion allows mapping of brain circuits

Tissue expansion allows mapping of brain circuits
MIT researchers have developed a way to make extremely high-resolution images of tissue samples, at a fraction of the cost of other techniques that offer similar resolution. The new technique relies on expanding tissue before imaging it with a conventional light microscope. Two years ago, the MIT team showed that it was possible to expand tissue volumes 100-fold, resulting in an image resolution of about 60 nanometers.
19th April 2017

Nanoscale X-ray sensor improves imaging and radiotherapy

Nanoscale X-ray sensor improves imaging and radiotherapy
Using a tiny device known as an optical antenna, researchers have created an X-ray sensor that is integrated onto the end of an optical fibre just a few tens of microns in diameter. By detecting X-rays at an extremely small spatial scale, the sensor could be combined with X-ray delivering technologies to enable high-precision medical imaging and therapeutic applications.
3rd April 2017


LED-based imaging device detects skin damage

LED-based imaging device detects skin damage
To eradicate any cancer cells that may potentially remain after surgery or chemotherapy, many breast cancer patients also undergo radiation therapy. All patients experience unfortunate side effects including skin irritation, and sometimes peeling and blistering. Patients can also develop permanent discoloration of the skin and thickening of the breast tissue months, or even years, after treatment.
3rd April 2017

Fluorescent probe could reveal cancer

Fluorescent probe could reveal cancer
A fluorescent probe developed by Michigan Tech chemist Haiying Liu illuminates the enzyme beta-galactosidase in a cell culture, which could help cancer surgeons. What if you could plaster cancer cells with glowing "Here We Are" signs, so surgeons could be confident that they'd removed every last speck of a tumor? That's what Haiying Liu has in mind for his new fluorescent probe.
29th March 2017

Low-cost method produces light-based lab-on-a-chip devices

A fabrication process could make it easier and less expensive to incorporate optical sensing onto lab-on-a-chip devices. These devices integrate laboratory functions onto a plastic or glass "chip" typically no more than a few square centimeters in size, allowing automated testing in the doctor's office or various types of chemical or biological analysis with portable instruments.
27th March 2017

Taking pictures of the brain with surgical needle and laser light

Taking pictures of the brain with surgical needle and laser light
  With just an inexpensive micro-thin surgical needle and laser light, University of Utah engineers have discovered a minimally invasive, inexpensive way to take high-resolution pictures of an animal brain, a process that also could lead to a much less invasive method for humans.
21st March 2017

Method controls cell biology with light

Method controls cell biology with light
Researchers at the University of Alberta have developed a new method of controlling biology at the cellular level using light. The tool—called a photocleavable protein—breaks into two pieces when exposed to light, allowing scientists to study and manipulate activity inside cells in new and different ways. First, scientists use the photocleavable protein to link cellular proteins to inhibitors, preventing the cellular proteins from performing their usual function. This process is known as caging.
20th March 2017

Imaging technology creates 3D bladder reconstruction

Imaging technology creates 3D bladder reconstruction
The way doctors examine the bladder for tumors or stones is like exploring the contours of a cave with a flashlight. Using cameras attached to long, flexible instruments called endoscopes, they find that it’s sometimes difficult to orient the location of masses within the bladder’s blood vessel-lined walls. This could change with a new computer vision technique developed by Stanford researchers that creates 3D bladder reconstructions out of the endoscope’s otherwise fleeting images.
17th March 2017

Towards red-light regulated optogenetic tools

Towards red-light regulated optogenetic tools
  The aim of optogenetics is to control genetically modified cells using light. A team of Graz scientists led by Andreas Winkler from the Institute of Biochemistry at TU Graz have set a milestone in the future development of novel red-light regulated optogenetic tools for targeted cell stimulation.
6th March 2017


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LASER World of PHOTONICS 2017
26th June 2017
Germany Messe Munchen