Neuro

Displaying 21 - 25 of 25

Antibody design opens door for brain treatments

Antibody design opens door for brain treatments
Immunotherapy has proven to be effective against many serious diseases. But to treat diseases in the brain, the antibodies must first get past the obstacle of the blood-brain barrier. In a new study, a research group at Uppsala University describes their development of a new antibody design that increases brain uptake of antibodies almost 100-fold. Immunotherapy entails treatment with antibodies; it is the fastest growing field in pharmaceutical development.
17th January 2017

Understanding the purpose of inhibitory neurons

Understanding the purpose of inhibitory neurons
Researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory have developed a computational model of a neural circuit in the brain, which could shed light on the biological role of inhibitory neurons — neurons that keep other neurons from firing. The model describes a neural circuit consisting of an array of input neurons and an equivalent number of output neurons.
9th January 2017

Tissue in the brain may underlie better face recognition

Tissue in the brain may underlie better face recognition
People are born with brains riddled with excess neural connections. Those are slowly pruned back until early childhood when, scientists thought, the brain’s structure becomes relatively stable. Now a pair of studies, published in the issues of Science and in Cerebral Cortex, suggest this process is more complicated than previously thought. For the first time, the group found microscopic tissue growth in the brain continues in regions that also show changes in function.
6th January 2017


A radiation-free approach to imaging molecules in the brain

A radiation-free approach to imaging molecules in the brain
Scientists hoping to get a glimpse of molecules that control brain activity have devised a probe that allows them to image these molecules without using any chemical or radioactive labels. Currently the gold standard approach to imaging molecules in the brain is to tag them with radioactive probes. However, these probes offer low resolution and they can’t easily be used to watch dynamic events, says Alan Jasanoff, an MIT professor of biological engineering and brain and cognitive sciences.
5th December 2016

Magnetic brain stimulation brings stowed memories back

Brad Postle’s lab, at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, is challenging the idea that working memory remembers things through sustained brain activity. They caught brains tucking less-important information away somewhere beyond the reach of the tools that typically monitor brain activity — and then they snapped that information back into active attention with magnets. Their latest study will be published in the journal Science.
5th December 2016


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LASER World of PHOTONICS 2017
26th June 2017
Germany Messe Munchen