Neuro

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NET probes form reliable integration with the brain

NET probes form reliable integration with the brain
Engineering researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have designed ultra-flexible, nanoelectronic thread (NET) brain probes that can achieve more reliable long-term neural recording than existing probes and don't elicit scar formation when implanted. The researchers described their findings in a research article published in Science Advances.
16th February 2017

Brain model quantifies pain beyond sensory input

Brain model quantifies pain beyond sensory input
Pain is a signal of actual or potential damage to the body, so it is natural to think of it as a localised sensation: knee pain in the knee, back pain in the back and so on. However, research has demonstrated that pain is an experience constructed in the brain. A knee doesn't "feel" anything. Instead, it sends signals to the brain. Input from the body is important, but a person's pain experience also depends on the brain's interpretation of what the input signal means.
14th February 2017

How does dopamine influence brain activity?

How does dopamine influence brain activity?
MIT chemical engineers have developed an extremely sensitive detector that can track single cells’ secretion of dopamine, a brain chemical responsible for carrying messages involved in reward-motivated behavior, learning, and memory. Using arrays of up to 20,000 tiny sensors, the researchers can monitor dopamine secretion of single neurons, allowing them to explore critical questions about dopamine dynamics. Until now, that has been very difficult to do.
10th February 2017


Brain-computer interface allows locked-in people to communicate

Brain-computer interface allows locked-in people to communicate
A brain-computer interface that can decipher the thoughts of people who are unable to communicate could revolutionise the lives of those living with completely locked-in syndrome, according to a paper publishing in PLOS Biology. Counter to expectations, the participants in the study reported being "happy", despite their extreme condition. The research was conducted by a multinational team, led by Professor Niels Birbaumer, at the Wyss Center for Bio and Neuroengineering in Geneva, Switzerland.
1st February 2017

Developing tools to enhance human memory

Developing tools to enhance human memory
The EU-funded RECALL project has been exploring ways of using technology to augment human memory, for instance by feeding data from purpose-built personal memory banks onto screens and other interfaces to replay and remind people of key information from events in the recent or distant past. Four European universities came together in the three-year RECALL project to research the possibilities of using technology to augment human memory.
19th January 2017

Analysing molecular mechanisms behind cognition

Analysing molecular mechanisms behind cognition
EU-funded scientists have investigated the role of synapse dysfunction in intellectual development and shed more light on the molecular mechanisms behind cognition. The aim MASDUHID (Molecular analysis of synaptic dysfunctions underlying human intellectual disabilities) project was to understand the synaptic molecular dysfunction associated with intellectual disorders, especially non-syndromic intellectual disability (NSID).
18th January 2017

Antibody design opens door for brain treatments

Antibody design opens door for brain treatments
Immunotherapy has proven to be effective against many serious diseases. But to treat diseases in the brain, the antibodies must first get past the obstacle of the blood-brain barrier. In a new study, a research group at Uppsala University describes their development of a new antibody design that increases brain uptake of antibodies almost 100-fold. Immunotherapy entails treatment with antibodies; it is the fastest growing field in pharmaceutical development.
17th January 2017

Understanding the purpose of inhibitory neurons

Understanding the purpose of inhibitory neurons
Researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory have developed a computational model of a neural circuit in the brain, which could shed light on the biological role of inhibitory neurons — neurons that keep other neurons from firing. The model describes a neural circuit consisting of an array of input neurons and an equivalent number of output neurons.
9th January 2017

Tissue in the brain may underlie better face recognition

Tissue in the brain may underlie better face recognition
People are born with brains riddled with excess neural connections. Those are slowly pruned back until early childhood when, scientists thought, the brain’s structure becomes relatively stable. Now a pair of studies, published in the issues of Science and in Cerebral Cortex, suggest this process is more complicated than previously thought. For the first time, the group found microscopic tissue growth in the brain continues in regions that also show changes in function.
6th January 2017

A radiation-free approach to imaging molecules in the brain

A radiation-free approach to imaging molecules in the brain
Scientists hoping to get a glimpse of molecules that control brain activity have devised a probe that allows them to image these molecules without using any chemical or radioactive labels. Currently the gold standard approach to imaging molecules in the brain is to tag them with radioactive probes. However, these probes offer low resolution and they can’t easily be used to watch dynamic events, says Alan Jasanoff, an MIT professor of biological engineering and brain and cognitive sciences.
5th December 2016


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LASER World of PHOTONICS 2017
26th June 2017
Germany Messe Munchen