Neuro

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Neural stem cells discovered to control ageing

Neural stem cells discovered to control ageing
Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have found that stem cells in the brain's hypothalamus govern how fast aging occurs in the body. The finding, made in mice, could lead to new strategies for warding off age-related diseases and extending lifespan. The paper was published in Nature. The hypothalamus was known to regulate important processes including growth, development, reproduction and metabolism.
27th July 2017

Device may contribute to creating a neuromorphic computer

Device may contribute to creating a neuromorphic computer
Of all things that contemporary science is capable of observing in the universe, nothing outperforms the human brain or can even be compared to it in terms of functionality, plasticity and efficiency. The brain is a massively parallel processor of information, consuming an amount of energy on the order of a femtojoules (10-15 J) per synaptic event. As a comparison, an ordinary 100 W bulb consumes one hundred quadrillion times more energy per second.
19th July 2017

Neural stem cells guided by electric fields in rat brain

Neural stem cells guided by electric fields in rat brain
Electric fields can be used to guide neural stem cells transplanted into the brain towards a specific location. The research, published in the journal Stem Cell Reports, opens possibilities for effectively guiding stem cells to repair brain damage. Professor Min Zhao at the University of California, Davis School of Medicine's Institute for Regenerative Cures studies how electric fields can guide wound healing.
18th July 2017


Imaging technique to help study neuro diseases

Imaging technique to help study neuro diseases
Researchers have developed a fast and practical molecular-scale imaging technique that could let scientists view never-before-seen dynamics of biological processes involved in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and multiple sclerosis. The new technique reveals a sample’s chemical makeup as well as the orientation of molecules making up that sample, information that can be used to understand how molecules are behaving.
18th July 2017

Whole-brain imaging improves understanding of brain disease

Whole-brain imaging improves understanding of brain disease
Researchers at Osaka University develop a high-speed serial-sectioning imaging system that captures high-resolution images of a whole mouse brain and furthers our understanding of brain diseases in rodents and primates. To fully understand brain function and dysfunction, it is important to be able to visualise changes in anatomy and activity in the whole brain.
18th July 2017

Independent brain activation patterns in bilingual people

Independent brain activation patterns in bilingual people
A team of researchers from China and the U.S. has found independent brain activation patterns in bilingual people when they switch between languages. In their paper published in Science Advances, the group explains how they used a two-pronged approach to learn more about how the brain allows people to speak in more than one language. Scientists have long been intrigued by the brain's ability to learn more than one language—perhaps equally intriguing is the ability of the brain to instantly switch between languages.
13th July 2017

Million electrode array could support brain interfaces

Million electrode array could support brain interfaces
Researchers at Columbia University are working on substantially improving the abilities of brain-computer interfaces by creating a high density electrode array that can stimulate and read the brain at high precision. The research is part of DARPA’s Neural Engineering System Design (NESD) project that is working on all the different pieces necessary to build a truly advanced brain-computer systems.
13th July 2017

Optical microprobe controls deep brain regions

Optical microprobe controls deep brain regions
Researchers from the IIT in Lecce, Italy, and the Harvard Medical School in Boston, have developed a new optical microprobe able to control brain electrical activity by projecting light on wide volumes or selected portions of the central nervous system in an very controlled fashion. The study was published on Nature Neuroscience and it represents a first step toward low invasiveness devices for the diagnosis and treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases.
11th July 2017

Healing stroke damage with stem cells

Healing stroke damage with stem cells
Stroke is the leading cause of permanent disability in the U.S., striking nearly 800,000 people each year. Hemorrhagic, or bleeding, stroke is particularly devastating, says Mayo Clinic neurologist and critical care expert Dr. William D. Freeman. "About 40% of hemorrhagic stroke patients die within a month, and half of the survivors have some type of impairment," he adds.
6th July 2017

Quantum sensors herald next-gen wearable brain imaging

Quantum sensors herald next-gen wearable brain imaging
Scientists at the University of Nottingham are working with University College London (UCL) on a five year project which has the potential to revolutionise the world of human brain imaging. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a technique for mapping brain activity - it measures the magnetic fields generated by electrical currents that occur naturally in the brain.
5th July 2017


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