Neuro

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Electricity improves short-term memory

Electricity improves short-term memory
Scientists have uncovered a method for improving short-term working memory, by stimulating the brain with electricity to synchronise brain waves. Researchers at Imperial College London found that applying a low voltage current can bring different areas of the brain in sync with one another, enabling people to perform better on tasks involving working memory.
14th March 2017

Low-energy artificial synapse aids neural network computing

Low-energy artificial synapse aids neural network computing
For all the improvements in computer technology over the years, we still struggle to recreate the low-energy, elegant processing of the human brain. Now, researchers at Stanford University and Sandia National Laboratories have made an advance that could help computers mimic one piece of the brain’s efficient design – an artificial version of the space over which neurons communicate, called a synapse.
22nd February 2017

Brain-computer interface allows typing by people with paralysis

Brain-computer interface allows typing by people with paralysis
A clinical research publication led by Stanford University investigators has demonstrated that a brain-to-computer hookup can enable people with paralysis to type via direct brain control at the highest speeds and accuracy levels reported to date. The report involved three study participants with severe limb weakness—two from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also called Lou Gehrig's disease, and one from a spinal cord injury.
21st February 2017


Big improvement to brain-computer interface

Big improvement to brain-computer interface
The Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering (CSNE) - a collaboration of San Diego State University with the University of Washington and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology - is working on an implantable brain chip that can record neural electrical signals and transmit them to receivers in the limb, bypassing the damage and restoring movement.
20th February 2017

NET probes form reliable integration with the brain

NET probes form reliable integration with the brain
Engineering researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have designed ultra-flexible, nanoelectronic thread (NET) brain probes that can achieve more reliable long-term neural recording than existing probes and don't elicit scar formation when implanted. The researchers described their findings in a research article published in Science Advances.
16th February 2017

Brain model quantifies pain beyond sensory input

Brain model quantifies pain beyond sensory input
Pain is a signal of actual or potential damage to the body, so it is natural to think of it as a localised sensation: knee pain in the knee, back pain in the back and so on. However, research has demonstrated that pain is an experience constructed in the brain. A knee doesn't "feel" anything. Instead, it sends signals to the brain. Input from the body is important, but a person's pain experience also depends on the brain's interpretation of what the input signal means.
14th February 2017

How does dopamine influence brain activity?

How does dopamine influence brain activity?
MIT chemical engineers have developed an extremely sensitive detector that can track single cells’ secretion of dopamine, a brain chemical responsible for carrying messages involved in reward-motivated behavior, learning, and memory. Using arrays of up to 20,000 tiny sensors, the researchers can monitor dopamine secretion of single neurons, allowing them to explore critical questions about dopamine dynamics. Until now, that has been very difficult to do.
10th February 2017

Brain-computer interface allows locked-in people to communicate

Brain-computer interface allows locked-in people to communicate
A brain-computer interface that can decipher the thoughts of people who are unable to communicate could revolutionise the lives of those living with completely locked-in syndrome, according to a paper publishing in PLOS Biology. Counter to expectations, the participants in the study reported being "happy", despite their extreme condition. The research was conducted by a multinational team, led by Professor Niels Birbaumer, at the Wyss Center for Bio and Neuroengineering in Geneva, Switzerland.
1st February 2017

Developing tools to enhance human memory

Developing tools to enhance human memory
The EU-funded RECALL project has been exploring ways of using technology to augment human memory, for instance by feeding data from purpose-built personal memory banks onto screens and other interfaces to replay and remind people of key information from events in the recent or distant past. Four European universities came together in the three-year RECALL project to research the possibilities of using technology to augment human memory.
19th January 2017

Analysing molecular mechanisms behind cognition

Analysing molecular mechanisms behind cognition
EU-funded scientists have investigated the role of synapse dysfunction in intellectual development and shed more light on the molecular mechanisms behind cognition. The aim MASDUHID (Molecular analysis of synaptic dysfunctions underlying human intellectual disabilities) project was to understand the synaptic molecular dysfunction associated with intellectual disorders, especially non-syndromic intellectual disability (NSID).
18th January 2017


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LASER World of PHOTONICS 2017
26th June 2017
Germany Messe Munchen