Neuro

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Silicon probes enable recording of brain activity

Silicon probes enable recording of brain activity
A team involving UCL scientists has developed a new device that could revolutionise our understanding of the brain by allowing researchers to map the activity of complex neural networks that control behaviour and decision making, in a way never before possible. The Neuropixels probes are described in a paper published in Nature. Neuropixels - tiny silicon probes thinner than a human hair – can simultaneously record the activity of hundreds of neurons across multiple different brain regions in mice and rats.
17th November 2017

Tiny neural probe records multiple brain regions at the same time

Tiny neural probe records multiple brain regions at the same time
Imec has designed and fabricated a breakthrough neural probe for the parallel recording of hundreds of neural signals. The Neuropixels probe was developed for an international consortium consisting of Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), the Allen Institute for Brain Science, the Gatsby Charitable Foundation and Wellcome, with funding of $5.5 million.
16th November 2017

Brain implant found to improve memory recall

Brain implant found to improve memory recall
A team of researchers with the University of Southern California and the Wake Forest School of Medicine has conducted experiments involving implanting electrodes into the brains of human volunteers to see if doing so might improve memory recall. The group gave a presentation at this year's Society for Neuroscience meeting recently outlining the study and what they found.
15th November 2017


Research links heading a football to CTE

Research links heading a football to CTE
A documentary aired on the BBC last night (12th November), has explored the link between heading a football and the onset of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a type of dementia associated with repeated blows to the head and recurrent episodes of concussion.
13th November 2017

The latest treatment for childhood epilepsy

The latest treatment for childhood epilepsy
Epilepsy is a common chronic neurologic disorder that affects 1-3 % of the population. When it comes to childhood absence epilepsy (CAE), a paediatric formulation of an antiepileptic drug is long overdue. A significant proportion of epilepsy syndromes have their onset in childhood and adolescence, and there is a great heterogeneity with respect to syndrome type, causes and prognoses.
9th November 2017

Technology provides means for studying neural circuits

Technology provides means for studying neural circuits
Finding out which neurons are connected with which others, and how they act together, is a huge challenge in neuroscience, and it’s crucial for understanding how brain circuits give rise to perception, motion, memory, and behaviour. A Brown University-developed technology called “trans-Tango" allows scientists to exploit the connections between pairs of neurons to make such discoveries in neuroscience.
6th November 2017

Technology relates brain circuits to alertness

Technology relates brain circuits to alertness
Stanford researchers have for the first time tied several brain circuits to alertness. The findings enhance scientists' understanding of the forces driving alertness, a brain state that's essential to survival, by showing that diverse cell types throughout the brain together produce this state. Problems tied to alertness deficits range from sleep deprivation to depression to brain-trauma-induced somnolence, while conditions such as anxiety, mania and post-traumatic stress disorder are often characterised by excessive alertness.
3rd November 2017

Research shows location of earliest signs of Alzheimer’s

Research shows location of earliest signs of Alzheimer’s
  Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have for the first time convincingly shown where in the brain the earliest signs of Alzheimer’s occur. The discovery could potentially become significant to future Alzheimer’s research while contributing to improved diagnostics.
2nd November 2017

Gel improves growth of neural stem cells in large quantities

Gel improves growth of neural stem cells in large quantities
In a recent paper in Nature Materials, Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering Sarah Heilshorn described a solution to the dual challenges of growing and preserving neural stem cells in a state where they are still able to mature into many different cell types. The first challenge is that growing stem cells in quantity requires space. Like traditional farming, it is a two-dimensional affair. If you want more wheat, corn or stem cells, you need more surface area.
2nd November 2017

Study shows how the brain reacts to difficult moral issues

Study shows how the brain reacts to difficult moral issues
  The family relationship between film characters clearly affects the reactions in the viewers' brain. The study has also detected a significant conflict between the reactions of the brain and the person's own account. Are we more prone to help the person that resembles us the most?
30th October 2017


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