Nanomedicine

Displaying 11 - 20 of 60

A nanofibre matrix for healing

A nanofibre matrix for healing
A matrix made of gelatin nanofibers on a synthetic polymer microfiber mesh may provide a better way to culture large quantities of healthy human stem cells. Developed by a team of researchers led by Ken-ichiro Kamei of Kyoto University’s Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), the ‘fibre-on-fibre’ (FF) matrix improves on currently available stem cell culturing techniques.
16th March 2017

Nano-implant could help restore sight

Nano-implant could help restore sight
A team of engineers at the University of California San Diego and La Jolla-based startup Nanovision Biosciences have developed the nanotechnology and wireless electronics for a new type of retinal prosthesis that brings research a step closer to restoring the ability of neurons in the retina to respond to light. The researchers demonstrated this response to light in a rat retina interfacing with a prototype of the device in vitro.
14th March 2017

A bright 'glow stick' marker for cells

A bright 'glow stick' marker for cells
Any child who has played with a glowstick or captured a firefly understands the wonder of chemiluminescence, or chemical light. This process is already used to detect blood at crime scenes and to determine the concentrations of different components of biological samples. In ACS Central Science, researchers introduced a chemiluminescent probe that is better for use in water and up to 3,000 times brighter than previous probes.
8th March 2017


Steroid releasing implant receives FDA approval

Steroid releasing implant receives FDA approval
Intersect ENT announced that the company has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its PROPEL Contour steroid releasing sinus implant. PROPEL Contour features an innovative hourglass design that facilitates treatment of patients with chronic sinusitis in the frontal (behind the forehead) and maxillary (behind the cheeks) sinuses.
27th February 2017

Switched-on DNA could aid nano-electronic applications

Switched-on DNA could aid nano-electronic applications
DNA may very well also pack quite the jolt for engineers trying to advance the development of tiny, low-cost electronic devices. Much like flipping your light switch at home—-only on a scale 1,000 times smaller than a human hair—-an ASU-led team has now developed the first controllable DNA switch to regulate the flow of electricity within a single, atomic-sized molecule. The new study, led by ASU Biodesign Institute researcher Nongjian Tao, was published in the journal Nature Communications.
20th February 2017

DNA computer brings 'intelligent drugs' a step closer

Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) present a new method that should enable controlled drug delivery into the bloodstream using DNA computers. In the journal Nature Communications the team, led by biomedical engineer Maarten Merkx, describes how it has developed the first DNA computer capable of detecting several antibodies in the blood and performing subsequent calculations based on this input.
20th February 2017

Nanoparticles deliver CRISPR/Cas9 safely into cells

Nanoparticles deliver CRISPR/Cas9 safely into cells
CRISPR/Cas9, a powerful gene editing technique that has already been used in a human, is thought by many as a “cut and paste” for DNA in living organisms. While in a sense that is what happens, delivering the ribonucleoprotein that does the genetic editing and the RNA that hones in on the target, into the cellular nucleus without being damaged is a challenge. That is why the efficiency of successful edits remains very low.
15th February 2017

MRI contrast agent turns on at sites of disease

MRI contrast agent turns on at sites of disease
  At the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) in South Korea, researchers have developed a type of MRI contrast agent that only lights up when near a target. It consists of two components, an “enhancer” which is the actual contrast agent that lights up and a “quencher” that controls the activation of the enhancer.
14th February 2017

DNA “barcoding” aids therapeutic delivery

DNA “barcoding” aids therapeutic delivery
Using tiny snippets of DNA as “barcodes,” researchers have developed a new technique for rapidly screening the ability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to specific organs of the body. The technique could accelerate the development and use of gene therapies for such killers as heart disease, cancer and Parkinson’s disease. Genetic therapies, such as those made from DNA or RNA, are hard to deliver into the right cells in the body.
9th February 2017

Nanoparticle screen could speed up drug development

Nanoparticle screen could speed up drug development
  Many scientists are pursuing ways to treat disease by delivering DNA or RNA that can turn a gene on or off. However, a major obstacle to progress in this field has been finding ways to safely deliver that genetic material to the correct cells. Encapsulating strands of RNA or DNA in tiny particles is one promising approach.
8th February 2017


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