Nanomedicine

Displaying 11 - 20 of 55

DNA computer brings 'intelligent drugs' a step closer

Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) present a new method that should enable controlled drug delivery into the bloodstream using DNA computers. In the journal Nature Communications the team, led by biomedical engineer Maarten Merkx, describes how it has developed the first DNA computer capable of detecting several antibodies in the blood and performing subsequent calculations based on this input.
20th February 2017

Nanoparticles deliver CRISPR/Cas9 safely into cells

Nanoparticles deliver CRISPR/Cas9 safely into cells
CRISPR/Cas9, a powerful gene editing technique that has already been used in a human, is thought by many as a “cut and paste” for DNA in living organisms. While in a sense that is what happens, delivering the ribonucleoprotein that does the genetic editing and the RNA that hones in on the target, into the cellular nucleus without being damaged is a challenge. That is why the efficiency of successful edits remains very low.
15th February 2017

MRI contrast agent turns on at sites of disease

MRI contrast agent turns on at sites of disease
  At the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) in South Korea, researchers have developed a type of MRI contrast agent that only lights up when near a target. It consists of two components, an “enhancer” which is the actual contrast agent that lights up and a “quencher” that controls the activation of the enhancer.
14th February 2017


DNA “barcoding” aids therapeutic delivery

DNA “barcoding” aids therapeutic delivery
Using tiny snippets of DNA as “barcodes,” researchers have developed a new technique for rapidly screening the ability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to specific organs of the body. The technique could accelerate the development and use of gene therapies for such killers as heart disease, cancer and Parkinson’s disease. Genetic therapies, such as those made from DNA or RNA, are hard to deliver into the right cells in the body.
9th February 2017

Nanoparticle screen could speed up drug development

Nanoparticle screen could speed up drug development
  Many scientists are pursuing ways to treat disease by delivering DNA or RNA that can turn a gene on or off. However, a major obstacle to progress in this field has been finding ways to safely deliver that genetic material to the correct cells. Encapsulating strands of RNA or DNA in tiny particles is one promising approach.
8th February 2017

Nanotechnology for hyperthermic cancer therapy

Nanotechnology for hyperthermic cancer therapy
Healthcare is the area where nanotechnology could bring revolutionary improvements. A European project investigated the possibility of nanotechnology applications for hyperthermic cancer therapy. Therapeutic applications based on metallic and magnetic nanoparticles already have prominent place in the development of anticancer nanotherapy. These nanoparticles generate heat, destroying cancer cells without damaging healthy tissues when excited by a remote energy source.
2nd February 2017

Nanoscience and magnetism create faster medical tests

Nanoscience and magnetism create faster medical tests
  A UCF researcher has combined cutting-edge nanoscience with a magnetic phenomenon discovered more than 170 years ago to create a method for speedy medical tests. The discovery, if commercialised, could lead to faster test results for HIV, Lyme disease, syphilis, rotavirus and other infectious conditions.
20th January 2017

Nanoparticles for drug delivery into the skin

Nanoparticles for drug delivery into the skin
Nanoparticles have emerged as important vehicles in drug delivery. Understanding the relationship between their structure and efficiency is central for maximising skin permeation. Systemic drug delivery often takes place through the skin due to its ease of use and better patient compliance. However, the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC) poses a significant barrier to drug application.
18th January 2017

Researchers develop wound-healing technology

Researchers develop wound-healing technology
  A WSU research team has successfully used a mild electric current to take on and beat drug-resistant bacterial infections, a technology that may eventually be used to treat chronic wound infections. The researchers report on their work in the online edition of npj Biofilms and Microbiomes.
29th November 2016

Nanoscale factories built to order

Nanoscale factories built to order
Performing chemical reactions inside tiny droplets can help manufacturers develop greener processes for coating drugs. A discovery led by Singapore's Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) could lead to improvements in the way drugs are delivered to the right parts of the body by uncovering the mechanisms that help oil, water, and free radicals mix in tiny droplets.
7th November 2016


Nanomedicine documents

Datasheets
Whitepapers

Sign up to view our publications

Sign up

Sign up to view our downloads

Sign up

EPE 2017 ECCE Europe
11th September 2017
Poland Warsaw
DSEI 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom ExCeL, London
RWM 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom NEC, Birmingham
Productronica India 2017
14th September 2017
India Pragati Maidan, New Delhi
Industry of Things World 2017
18th September 2017
Germany Berlin Congress Center