Nanomedicine

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DNA “barcoding” aids therapeutic delivery

DNA “barcoding” aids therapeutic delivery
Using tiny snippets of DNA as “barcodes,” researchers have developed a new technique for rapidly screening the ability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to specific organs of the body. The technique could accelerate the development and use of gene therapies for such killers as heart disease, cancer and Parkinson’s disease. Genetic therapies, such as those made from DNA or RNA, are hard to deliver into the right cells in the body.
9th February 2017

Nanoparticle screen could speed up drug development

Nanoparticle screen could speed up drug development
  Many scientists are pursuing ways to treat disease by delivering DNA or RNA that can turn a gene on or off. However, a major obstacle to progress in this field has been finding ways to safely deliver that genetic material to the correct cells. Encapsulating strands of RNA or DNA in tiny particles is one promising approach.
8th February 2017

Nanotechnology for hyperthermic cancer therapy

Nanotechnology for hyperthermic cancer therapy
Healthcare is the area where nanotechnology could bring revolutionary improvements. A European project investigated the possibility of nanotechnology applications for hyperthermic cancer therapy. Therapeutic applications based on metallic and magnetic nanoparticles already have prominent place in the development of anticancer nanotherapy. These nanoparticles generate heat, destroying cancer cells without damaging healthy tissues when excited by a remote energy source.
2nd February 2017


Nanoscience and magnetism create faster medical tests

Nanoscience and magnetism create faster medical tests
  A UCF researcher has combined cutting-edge nanoscience with a magnetic phenomenon discovered more than 170 years ago to create a method for speedy medical tests. The discovery, if commercialised, could lead to faster test results for HIV, Lyme disease, syphilis, rotavirus and other infectious conditions.
20th January 2017

Nanoparticles for drug delivery into the skin

Nanoparticles for drug delivery into the skin
Nanoparticles have emerged as important vehicles in drug delivery. Understanding the relationship between their structure and efficiency is central for maximising skin permeation. Systemic drug delivery often takes place through the skin due to its ease of use and better patient compliance. However, the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC) poses a significant barrier to drug application.
18th January 2017

Researchers develop wound-healing technology

Researchers develop wound-healing technology
  A WSU research team has successfully used a mild electric current to take on and beat drug-resistant bacterial infections, a technology that may eventually be used to treat chronic wound infections. The researchers report on their work in the online edition of npj Biofilms and Microbiomes.
29th November 2016

"Swallowing the surgeon"

"Swallowing the surgeon"
The 2016 Nobel Prize for Chemistry has been awarded to Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Sir Fraser Stoddart and Bernard Feringa, who will share the 8m kronor (£727,000) prize for the design and synthesis of machines on a molecular scale. They were named at a press conference in Sweden. The machines conceived by today’s laureates are a thousand times thinner than a strand of hair.
6th October 2016

Cancer nanomedicine reduces pancreatic tumour growth

Cancer nanomedicine reduces pancreatic tumour growth
Australian cancer researchers have developed a technology to deliver gene-silencing drugs to treat pancreatic cancer – the most chemo-resistant and deadly cancer in Australia. When tested in mice, the new nanomedicine resulted in a 50% reduction in the growth of tumours and reduced the spread of pancreatic cancer. The UNSW-led research, published in the Biomacromolecules journal, provides hope for pancreatic cancer patients, most of whom succumb to the disease within three to six months of diagnosis.
8th August 2016

Research programme explores nanomedicine characterisation

CEA-Leti has announced the launch of the European Nano-Characterisation Laboratory (EU-NCL), funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme. Its main objective is to reach a level of international excellence in nanomedicine characterisation for medical indications of cancer, diabetes, inflammatory diseases or infections, and make this accessible to all organisations developing candidate nanomedicines prior to their submission to regulatory agencies.
6th July 2015

NanoKTN Sparks New Nanomedicine Intelligence Start-Up: NanoScientium

The Nanotechnology Knowledge Transfer Network is pleased to announce the foundation of a new start-up company, NanoScientium, resulting from a NanoKTN NanoPharm focus group meeting held last year at the Stevenage Bioscience Catalyst (SBC).
12th February 2014


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LASER World of PHOTONICS 2017
26th June 2017
Germany Messe Munchen