Micros

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'Lab on a chip' costs 1 cent to produce

'Lab on a chip' costs 1 cent to produce
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have developed a way to produce a cheap and reusable diagnostic "lab on a chip" with the help of an ordinary inkjet printer. At a production cost of as little as 1 cent per chip, the new technology could usher in a medical diagnostics revolution like the kind brought on by low-cost genome sequencing, said Ron Davis, PhD, professor of biochemistry and of genetics and director of the Stanford Genome Technology Center.
9th February 2017

Acoustofluidic chip helps detect disease

Acoustofluidic chip helps detect disease
Scientists at Duke University have developed a way of concentrating nanoparticles inside a small device using only sound waves. This achievement may help introduce portable diagnostics that rely on attaching nanoparticles to biomarkers such as proteins and measuring how many find their targets. Nanoparticles tagged with fluorescent markers to make them easier to see are concentrated in a column by a new acoustic whirlpool device.
31st January 2017

Microcontrollers target medical, fitness applications

Microcontrollers target medical, fitness applications
The MAX32625/MAX32626 microcontrollers from Maxim Integrated are in stock at Mouser Electronics . The devices are based on the 32-bit RISC ARMCortex-M4F microcontroller with a floating point unit (FPU), and are ideally suited for medical and fitness applications. Both devices include 512MBytes of flash and 160kBytes of SRAM, with the architecture combining high-efficiency signal-processing functionality with low cost and ease of use.
18th January 2017


Low-power MCU family suitable for portable medical devices

Low-power MCU family suitable for portable medical devices
A family of microcontrollers (MCU) has been released by Microchip, the PIC24 GA7. According to the company, they are the lowest-cost 256KB Flash memory 16-bit MCUs available today and as a result these PIC24 devices enable cost-effective designs for Internet of Things (IoT) sensor nodes, portable medical devices and industrial control applications.
12th December 2016

Medical grade MLCCs offer versatility

Medical grade MLCCs offer versatility
The MQ Series medical grade of MLCCs has been released by AVX Corporation. Manufactured, tested, and qualified using stringent medical design, in-process, and lot acceptance requirements, MQ Series medical grade MLCCs deliver the reliability performance required by electronic life support applications, including: pacemakers, Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators (ICDs), and neuromodulation devices.
8th December 2016

Fanless medical panel PC powered with Intel 6th Gen Core

Fanless medical panel PC powered with Intel 6th Gen Core
A fanless medical panel PC, the HID-2132, has been released by Avalue Technology in November 2016. With high computing power, credible system stability, anti-microbial finish and UL 60601-1 medical certification, HID-2132 mainly targets at medical and healthcare applications such as patient infotainment terminal, hospital information system, special care (AAC), and nursing carts.
15th November 2016

Bionic chip records brain cell activity

Bionic chip records brain cell activity
  Brain functions are controlled by millions of brain cells. However, in order to understand how the brain controls functions, such as simple reflexes or learning and memory, we must be able to record the activity of large networks and groups of neurons.
26th October 2016

USB footswitch provides control for epiCam retinal camera

USB footswitch provides control for epiCam retinal camera
Epipole, based in Scotland, is an ethical designer and innovator of medical optical equipment that is focussed on the affordable eradication of preventable blindness. Its hand-held epiCam digital retinal fundus camera provides a low-cost solution to examine, record & store images of the internal structure of the eye - particularly for patients with diabetes where the early detection and treatment of a condition known as diabetic retinopathy can prevent the onset of blindness and other vision complications.
28th September 2016

Nanomachines could aid diagnosis

Professor Eric Henderson, along with former graduate student Divita Mathur, studies how to build nanomachines that may have real-world medical applications someday soon. He and Mathur recently published an article in the peer-reviewed Scientific Reports describing his laboratory’s successful effort to design a nanomachine capable of detecting a mockup of the Ebola virus. He said such a machine would prove valuable in the developing world, where access to diagnostic medical equipment can be rare.
4th July 2016

Micro-camera can be injected with a syringe

Micro-camera can be injected with a syringe
German engineers have created a camera no bigger than a grain of salt that could change the future of health imaging—and clandestine surveillance. Using 3D printing, researchers from the University of Stuttgart built a three-lens camera, and fit it onto the end of an optical fibre the width of two hairs. Such technology could be used as minimally-intrusive endoscopes for exploring inside the human body, the engineers reported in the journal Nature Photonics.
28th June 2016


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