Micros

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Quartz crystals designed for medical applications

Quartz crystals designed for medical applications
Euroquartz has announced the availability of three new ranges of ultra-miniature quartz crystals from Statek that are designed for use in medical-implantable wireless RF transceiver applications using Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) or Medical Implant Communications Service (MICS) specifications. The CX16, CX18 and CX20 series are ultra-miniature devices operating in the 16MHz and above frequency range requested by BLE transceiver ICs.
14th July 2017

Organ-on-chip senses electrical activity and cell resistance

Organ-on-chip senses electrical activity and cell resistance
Organ-on-chip technology promises to help speed up and improve research on how potential new drugs will interact with the body’s own organs. Additionally, it may alleviate the need for in-animal studies that can be difficult to perform and that too often produce misleading results. Organs-on-chip are essentially specialised microfluidic devices within which living cells are grown, supported, and experimented on.
16th June 2017

Heart rate click board adds biometrics to designs

The Heart Rate 4 click board from MikroElektronika is now in stock at Mouser Electronics. It measures the oxygen saturation in a person’s blood through pulse oximetry. The click board incorporates the Maxim MAX30101 pulse oximeter and heart-rate sensor.
15th June 2017


Lab on a chip monitors health and exposure to pollutants

Lab on a chip monitors health and exposure to pollutants
Imagine wearing a device that continuously analyses your sweat or blood for different types of biomarkers, such as proteins that show you may have breast cancer or lung cancer. Rutgers engineers have invented biosensor technology - known as a lab on a chip - that could be used in hand-held or wearable devices to monitor your health and exposure to dangerous bacteria, viruses and pollutants.
13th June 2017

Platforms implement electrophysiological cell analysis

Platforms implement electrophysiological cell analysis
MaxWell Biosystems AG’s head office is hidden away in a Basel laboratory building previously used by Syngenta, just a stone’s throw from ETH Zurich’s Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering (D-BSSE). Most rooms are still empty, but on the third floor, in a spacious laboratory at the end of a long corridor, the entrepreneurial atmosphere is already palpable.
24th May 2017

'Heart-on-a-chip' can improve drug development

'Heart-on-a-chip' can improve drug development
Through "heart-on-a-chip" technology - modeling a human heart on an engineered chip and measuring the effects of compound exposure on functions of heart tissue using microelectrodes - Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers hope to decrease the time needed for new drug trials and ensure potentially lifesaving drugs are safe and effective while reducing the need for human and animal testing.
15th May 2017

Big improvement to brain-computer interface

Big improvement to brain-computer interface
The Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering (CSNE) - a collaboration of San Diego State University with the University of Washington and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology - is working on an implantable brain chip that can record neural electrical signals and transmit them to receivers in the limb, bypassing the damage and restoring movement.
20th February 2017

inRiver PIM solution for non-invasive orthopaedics

Fast-growing digital innovation and management consultancy, Swedish Alite International will become a supplier of inRiver PIM solutions to Icelandic Össur, a global leader in non-invasive orthopaedics. The new solution will help Össur increase its presence in new markets, and facilitate an international and complex environment that handles large amounts of product information in multiple languages.
17th February 2017

'Lab on a chip' costs 1 cent to produce

'Lab on a chip' costs 1 cent to produce
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have developed a way to produce a cheap and reusable diagnostic "lab on a chip" with the help of an ordinary inkjet printer. At a production cost of as little as 1 cent per chip, the new technology could usher in a medical diagnostics revolution like the kind brought on by low-cost genome sequencing, said Ron Davis, PhD, professor of biochemistry and of genetics and director of the Stanford Genome Technology Center.
9th February 2017

Acoustofluidic chip helps detect disease

Acoustofluidic chip helps detect disease
Scientists at Duke University have developed a way of concentrating nanoparticles inside a small device using only sound waves. This achievement may help introduce portable diagnostics that rely on attaching nanoparticles to biomarkers such as proteins and measuring how many find their targets. Nanoparticles tagged with fluorescent markers to make them easier to see are concentrated in a column by a new acoustic whirlpool device.
31st January 2017


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SPE Offshore Europe 2017
5th September 2017
United Kingdom Aberdeen Exhibition & Conference Centre
EPE 2017 ECCE Europe
11th September 2017
Poland Warsaw
ON Semiconductor Power Seminars 2017
11th September 2017
United Kingdom
DSEI 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom ExCeL, London
RWM 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom NEC, Birmingham