Genetic Eng.

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Method could revolutionise single cell analysis

Method could revolutionise single cell analysis
ETH researchers have developed a method using a nanosyringe whose tiny needle is able to penetrate single living cells and extract their content. The technology can be used for cell cultures, for example, in order to investigate the interior of the cells. This allows scientists to identify the differences between individual cells at the molecular level, as well as to identify and analyse rare cell types.
15th July 2016

Material can kill E. Coli bacteria in just 30 seconds

Material can kill E. Coli bacteria in just 30 seconds
Every day, we are exposed to millions of harmful bacteria that can cause infectious diseases, such as the E. coli bacteria. Now, researchers at the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN) of A*STAR have developed a new material that can kill the E. coli bacteria within 30 seconds. This finding has been published in the peer-reviewed journal Small.
3rd June 2016

Genetic switch could be key to increased health & lifespan

Genetic switch could be key to increased health & lifespan
Recently discovered genetic switches that increase lifespan and boost fitness in worms are also linked to increased lifespan in mammals, offering hope that drugs to flip these switches could improve human metabolic function and increase longevity. These so-called epigenetic switches, discovered by scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland, are enzymes that are ramped up after mild stress during early development and continue to affect the expression of genes throughout the animal’s life.
5th May 2016


Method for textiles could help human tissue manufacturing

Method for textiles could help human tissue manufacturing
Elizabeth Loboa, dean of the MU College of Engineering, and her team recently tested methods to make the process of tissue engineering more cost effective and producible in larger quantities. Tissues could help patients suffering from wounds caused by diabetes and circulation disorders, patients in need of cartilage or bone repair and to women who have had mastectomies by replacing their breast tissue.
8th April 2016

Helping humans realise their full regenerative potential

Helping humans realise their full regenerative potential
If you trace our evolutionary tree way back to its roots -- long before the shedding of gills or the development of opposable thumbs -- you will likely find a common ancestor with the amazing ability to regenerate lost body parts. Lucky descendants of this creature, including today’s salamanders or zebrafish, can still perform the feat, but humans lost much of their regenerative power over millions of years of evolution.
7th April 2016

'Person-on-a-chip' grows human tissues outside the body

'Person-on-a-chip' grows human tissues outside the body
Researchers have developed a way of growing realistic human tissues outside the body. Their 'person-on-a-chip' technology, called AngioChip, is a platform for discovering and testing new drugs, and could eventually be used to repair or replace damaged organs. Prof. Milica Radisic, graduate student Boyang Zhang and the rest of the team are among those research groups around the world racing to find ways to grow human tissues in the lab, under conditions that mimic a real person's body.
8th March 2016

Understanding skin cells could enhance anti-aging treatments

Understanding skin cells could enhance anti-aging treatments
A breakthrough in understanding human skin cells offers a pathway for new anti-ageing treatments. For the first time, scientists at Newcastle University have identified that the activity of a key metabolic enzyme found in the batteries of human skin cells declines with age. A study, published online in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, has found that the activity of mitochondrial complex II significantly decreases in older skin.
29th February 2016

HFEA approves 'gene editing' on human embryos

HFEA approves 'gene editing' on human embryos
The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) has approved a research application from the Francis Crick Institute to use new 'gene editing' techniques on human embryos. The aim of the research, led by Dr Kathy Niakan, a group leader at the Crick, is to understand the genes human embryos need to develop successfully.
4th February 2016

Gene-editing technology can repair blindness

Gene-editing technology can repair blindness
Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and University of Iowa scientists have used a new gene-editing technology called CRISPR to repair a genetic mutation responsible for retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited condition that causes the retina to degrade and leads to blindness in at least 1.5m cases worldwide.
29th January 2016

Using electrical signals to train the heart's muscle cells

Using electrical signals to train the heart's muscle cells
Columbia Engineering researchers have shown, for the first time, that electrical stimulation of human heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes) engineered from human stem cells aids their development and function. The team used electrical signals, designed to mimic those in a developing heart, to regulate and synchronise the beating properties of nascent cardiomyocytes, the cells that support the beating function of the heart.
20th January 2016


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EPE 2017 ECCE Europe
11th September 2017
Poland Warsaw
DSEI 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom ExCeL, London
RWM 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom NEC, Birmingham
Productronica India 2017
14th September 2017
India Pragati Maidan, New Delhi
Industry of Things World 2017
18th September 2017
Germany Berlin Congress Center