Genetic Eng.

Displaying 11 - 20 of 51

Hematopoietic stem cells suitable for transplantation

Hematopoietic stem cells suitable for transplantation
  Researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine have discovered a method to make an unlimited supply of healthy blood cells from the readily available cells that line blood vessels. This achievement marks the first time that any research group has generated such blood-forming stem cells.
18th May 2017

Stem cell technology is helping mankind to boldly go...

Stem cell technology is helping mankind to boldly go...
One of the UK’s leading stem cell storage and diagnostics companies has claimed that stem cell technology could mean the difference between life and death in any attempt to travel beyond the planet Earth to Mars, claiming that advanced medical techniques will be required to cope with the rigours of interplanetary space.
25th April 2017

Using CRISPR to restore visual function

Using CRISPR to restore visual function
Using the gene-editing tool CRISPR/Cas9, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Shiley Eye Institute at UC San Diego Health, with colleagues in China, have reprogrammed mutated rod photoreceptors to become functioning cone photoreceptors, reversing cellular degeneration and restoring visual function in two mouse models of retinitis pigmentosa. The findings are published in Cell Research.
24th April 2017


DNA and proteins help develop complex hybrid structures

DNA and proteins help develop complex hybrid structures
Florian Praetorius and Prof. Hendrik Dietz of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a new method that can be used to construct custom hybrid structures using DNA and proteins. The method opens new opportunities for fundamental research in cell biology and for applications in biotechnology and medicine. Desoxyribonucleic acid, better known by its abbreviation DNA, carries our genetic information.
27th March 2017

The genes that influence growth of prostate and breast tumours

The genes that influence growth of prostate and breast tumours
Mutations in tumour suppressor genes mean that they can no longer keep tumours from growing. In developing cancer, often several mutations come into play. Using "jumping genes," scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) together with teams from Great Britain and Spain have identified a number of genes that can influence the growth of prostate and breast tumours. They published their results in Nature Genetics.
23rd March 2017

Spinoff harnesses stem cells for medical uses

Spinoff harnesses stem cells for medical uses
Stem Pharm, a University of Wisconsin–Madison startup built on inventions related to the growth and control of stem cells, received a $290,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health. The grant will support Stem Pharm’s continued development of sophisticated biological materials that can efficiently manufacture stem cells for medical use. Stem Pharm’s custom materials support growing human cells to evaluate potential drugs or serve as replacement tissues for regenerative medicine.
23rd January 2017

Principle for epigenetic changes discovered

  In a study, researchers at Uppsala University have found evidence of a new principle for how epigenetic changes can occur. The principle is based on an enzyme, tryptase, that has epigenetic effects that cause cells to proliferate in an uncontrolled manner.
23rd January 2017

Optogenetics fine-tuned

Optogenetics fine-tuned
Currently, optogenetics is a blunt-force instrument for manipulating neural activity, which limits its usefulness in the delicate environment of the brain. Researchers have demonstrated that optogenetics can be used as a finely tempered tool to observe and manipulate neural activity. Recent reports have emerged providing the opportunity to balance out excitation and inhibition of neural circuits using optogenetic techniques.
18th January 2017

Designer switches could streamline stem cell biology

Designer switches could streamline stem cell biology
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison have developed a novel strategy to reprogram cells from one type to another in a more efficient and less biased manner than previous methods. The ability to convert cells from one type to another holds great promise for engineering cells and tissues for therapeutic application, and the new Wisconsin study could help speed research and bring the technology to the clinic faster.
6th December 2016

One step closer to regeneration in humans

One step closer to regeneration in humans
What if humans could regrow an amputated arm or leg, or completely restore nervous system function after a spinal cord injury? A new study of one of our closest invertebrate relatives, the acorn worm, reveals that this feat might one day be possible. Acorn worms burrow in the sand around coral reefs, but their ancestral relationship to chordates means they have a genetic makeup and body plan surprisingly similar to ours.
29th November 2016


Genetic Eng. documents

Datasheets
Whitepapers

Sign up to view our publications

Sign up

Sign up to view our downloads

Sign up

EPE 2017 ECCE Europe
11th September 2017
Poland Warsaw
DSEI 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom ExCeL, London
RWM 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom NEC, Birmingham
Productronica India 2017
14th September 2017
India Pragati Maidan, New Delhi
Industry of Things World 2017
18th September 2017
Germany Berlin Congress Center