Genetic Eng.

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DNA and proteins help develop complex hybrid structures

DNA and proteins help develop complex hybrid structures
Florian Praetorius and Prof. Hendrik Dietz of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a new method that can be used to construct custom hybrid structures using DNA and proteins. The method opens new opportunities for fundamental research in cell biology and for applications in biotechnology and medicine. Desoxyribonucleic acid, better known by its abbreviation DNA, carries our genetic information.
27th March 2017

The genes that influence growth of prostate and breast tumours

The genes that influence growth of prostate and breast tumours
Mutations in tumour suppressor genes mean that they can no longer keep tumours from growing. In developing cancer, often several mutations come into play. Using "jumping genes," scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) together with teams from Great Britain and Spain have identified a number of genes that can influence the growth of prostate and breast tumours. They published their results in Nature Genetics.
23rd March 2017

Spinoff harnesses stem cells for medical uses

Spinoff harnesses stem cells for medical uses
Stem Pharm, a University of Wisconsin–Madison startup built on inventions related to the growth and control of stem cells, received a $290,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health. The grant will support Stem Pharm’s continued development of sophisticated biological materials that can efficiently manufacture stem cells for medical use. Stem Pharm’s custom materials support growing human cells to evaluate potential drugs or serve as replacement tissues for regenerative medicine.
23rd January 2017


Principle for epigenetic changes discovered

  In a study, researchers at Uppsala University have found evidence of a new principle for how epigenetic changes can occur. The principle is based on an enzyme, tryptase, that has epigenetic effects that cause cells to proliferate in an uncontrolled manner.
23rd January 2017

Optogenetics fine-tuned

Optogenetics fine-tuned
Currently, optogenetics is a blunt-force instrument for manipulating neural activity, which limits its usefulness in the delicate environment of the brain. Researchers have demonstrated that optogenetics can be used as a finely tempered tool to observe and manipulate neural activity. Recent reports have emerged providing the opportunity to balance out excitation and inhibition of neural circuits using optogenetic techniques.
18th January 2017

Designer switches could streamline stem cell biology

Designer switches could streamline stem cell biology
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison have developed a novel strategy to reprogram cells from one type to another in a more efficient and less biased manner than previous methods. The ability to convert cells from one type to another holds great promise for engineering cells and tissues for therapeutic application, and the new Wisconsin study could help speed research and bring the technology to the clinic faster.
6th December 2016

Engineered cells with 'built-in genetic circuit' prevent tumour growth

Engineered cells with 'built-in genetic circuit' prevent tumour growth
Researchers at the University of Southampton have engineered cells with a 'built-in genetic circuit' that produces a molecule that inhibits the ability of tumours to survive and grow in their low oxygen environment. The genetic circuit produces the machinery necessary for the production of a compound that inhibits a protein which has a significant and critical role in the growth and survival of cancer cells. This results in the cancer cells being unable to survive in the low oxygen, low nutrient tumour micro-environment.
25th November 2016

Synthetic cells can isolate genetic circuits

Synthetic cells can isolate genetic circuits
Synthetic biology allows scientists to design genetic circuits that can be placed in cells, giving them new functions such as producing drugs or other useful molecules. However, as these circuits become more complex, the genetic components can interfere with each other, making it difficult to achieve more complicated functions. MIT researchers have now demonstrated that these circuits can be isolated within individual synthetic “cells,” preventing them from disrupting each other.
15th November 2016

PET scan tracer reveals epigenetic activity in the human brain

A PET radiotracer developed at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) is able for the first time to reveal epigenetic activity - the process that determines whether or not genes are expressed - within the human brain. In their report published in Science Translational Medicine, a team of MGH/Martinos Center investigators reports how their radiochemical - called Martinostat - shows the expression levels of important epigenetics-regulating enzymes in the brains of healthy volunteers.
11th August 2016

Genetic switch could be key to increased health & lifespan

Genetic switch could be key to increased health & lifespan
Recently discovered genetic switches that increase lifespan and boost fitness in worms are also linked to increased lifespan in mammals, offering hope that drugs to flip these switches could improve human metabolic function and increase longevity. These so-called epigenetic switches, discovered by scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland, are enzymes that are ramped up after mild stress during early development and continue to affect the expression of genes throughout the animal’s life.
5th May 2016


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LASER World of PHOTONICS 2017
26th June 2017
Germany Messe Munchen