Diagnosis

Displaying 11 - 20 of 96

Wearable sweat sensor can diagnose cystic fibrosis

Wearable sweat sensor can diagnose cystic fibrosis
A wristband-type wearable sweat sensor could transform diagnostics and drug evaluation for cystic fibrosis, diabetes and other diseases. The sensor collects sweat, measures its molecular constituents and then electronically transmits the results for analysis and diagnostics, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, in collaboration with the University of California-Berkeley.
20th April 2017

Advanced diagnostics added to level transmitters

Advanced diagnostics added to level transmitters
A new Heartbeat Technology has been added to Endress+Hauser’s Micropilot FMR5X free-space radar and FMP5X Levelflex guided radar level transmitters. Heartbeat Technology is an on-board diagnostics and instrument verification system that continuously monitors the status of mechanical, electromechanical and electronic components in the sensor, and sends alerts when it detects a problem.
18th April 2017

Diagnosing Alzheimer’s from cheek swab

3D Signatures have developed the TeloView system, a software platform that can analyse telomere patterns in cells to diagnose disease. The company recently announced the results of a clinical study, due for publication in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, in which the software could reportedly identify Alzheimer’s disease and predict if the disease was mild, moderate, or severe, based on analysing a cheek swab sample from patients.
30th March 2017


Test strips could detect cervical cancer earlier

Test strips could detect cervical cancer earlier
  Purdue researchers are developing technology that could lead to the early detection of cervical cancer with low-cost, easy-to-use, lateral flow test strips similar to home pregnancy tests.
30th March 2017

Detecting mutations could lead to earlier liver cancer diagnosis

Detecting mutations could lead to earlier liver cancer diagnosis
In many parts of the world, including Southeast Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, exposure to a fungal product called aflatoxin is believed to cause up to 80 percent of liver cancer cases. This fungus is often found in corn, peanuts, and other crops that are dietary staples in those regions. MIT researchers have now developed a way to determine, by sequencing DNA of liver cells, whether those cells have been exposed to aflatoxin.
28th March 2017

Improving the diagnosis of tuberculosis

Improving the diagnosis of tuberculosis
Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major health threat in human and farm animals. Novel diagnostic kits capable of differentiating between active and latent infections should improve clinical outcome. Diagnosis of human and bovine TB is extremely difficult, time-consuming and inefficient. Currently, there is no diagnostic test that can differentiate between active and latent TB.
27th March 2017

Non-invasive approach provides prostate cancer diagnosing

Non-invasive approach provides prostate cancer diagnosing
Technology being developed at Washington State University provides a non-invasive approach for diagnosing prostate cancer and tracking the disease's progression. The innovative filter-like device isolates prostate cancer indicators from other cellular information in blood and urine. It could enable doctors to determine how cancer patients are responding to different treatments without needing to perform invasive biopsies.
22nd March 2017

Bioengineers detect early signs of damage in connective tissues

Bioengineers detect early signs of damage in connective tissues
A team of researchers led by University of Utah bioengineering professors Jeffrey Weiss and Michael Yu has discovered that damage to collagen, the main building block of all human tissue, can occur much earlier at a molecular level from too much physical stress, alerting doctors and scientists that a patient is on the path to major tissue damage and pain.
22nd March 2017

Blood test may soon be able to detect cancer

Blood test may soon be able to detect cancer
Doctors may soon be able to detect and monitor a patient's cancer with a simple blood test, reducing or eliminating the need for more invasive procedures, according to Purdue University research. W. Andy Tao, a professor of biochemistry and member of the Purdue University Center for Cancer Research and colleagues identified a series of proteins in blood plasma that, when elevated, signify that the patient has cancer. Their findings were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
8th March 2017

Technique offers breakthrough imaging of melanoma

Technique offers breakthrough imaging of melanoma
  Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, with over 232,000 new cases and 55,000 deaths per year worldwide. Those with light-skin or red hair are often prone to hard-to-detect melanomas, often caused by properties of pigments within skin called melanins.
8th March 2017


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LASER World of PHOTONICS 2017
26th June 2017
Germany Messe Munchen