Diagnosis

Displaying 111 - 120 of 154

Simple saliva test to diagnose asthma

Simple saliva test to diagnose asthma
A test which can diagnose asthma from a patient's saliva has been developed by Loughborough University. Around 5.4 million people currently receive treatment for asthma in the UK, of which 1.1 million are children. To diagnose the condition doctors usually measure a person's airflow lung capacity, however lung function tests can be inaccurate and do not reflect underlying changes associated with asthma.
16th September 2016

Method speeds up detection of infectious diseases

Method speeds up detection of infectious diseases
A team of UCLA researchers has found a way to speed and simplify the detection of proteins in blood and plasma opening up the potential for diagnosing the early presence of infectious diseases or cancer during a doctor's office visit. The test takes about 10 minutes as opposed to two to four hours for current state-of-the-art tests. The approach overcame several key challenges in detecting proteins that are biomarkers of disease.
1st September 2016

Exome sequence data aids the diagnosis of rare diseases

Exome sequence data aids the diagnosis of rare diseases
  Based on the largest resource of its kind, members of the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) led by scientists at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard report scientific findings from data on the exome sequences (protein-coding portions of the genome) from 60,706 people from diverse ethnic backgrounds.
18th August 2016


Computers excel at predicting lung cancer

Computers excel at predicting lung cancer
Computers can be trained to be more accurate than pathologists in assessing slides of lung cancer tissues, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The researchers found that a machine-learning approach to identifying critical disease-related features accurately differentiated between two types of lung cancers and predicted patient survival times better than the standard approach of pathologists classifying tumors by grade and stage.
16th August 2016

MRI technique enables consistent diagnoses

MRI technique enables consistent diagnoses
A technology harnesses imperfections that typically compromise MRI exams to create images resolved enough to enable consistent diagnoses across populations for the first time. These are findings of a study led by NYU Langone Medical Center and published in Nature Communications. Since its emergence in the 1970s, MRI has given physicians a better look inside tissues, helping to diagnose maladies from brain tumors to internal bleeding to torn ligaments.
16th August 2016

Enzyme-mapping helps target neglected diseases

Enzyme-mapping helps target neglected diseases
Scientists at MIT and the University of São Paulo in Brazil have identified the structure of an enzyme that could be a good target for drugs combating three diseases common in the developing world. The enzyme, fumarate hydratase (FH) is essential for metabolic processes of parasites that are responsible for the spread of three diseases: Leishmaniases, Chagas disease, and sleeping sickness.
16th August 2016

A way to enable rapid screening of anti-cancer compounds

A way to enable rapid screening of anti-cancer compounds
A chemistry graduate student at UChicago, Di Liu devised a way to make tiny knotted and interlocked chemical structures that have been impossible for chemists to fabricate until now, and he invented a way that those knots might be used to quickly screen hundreds of chemicals for fighting cancer. Many chemicals have knots or links as part of their structure. But synthesising new substances that tie themselves in knots at the molecular scale is prodigiously difficult.
12th August 2016

Lab-on-a-chip technology helps cancer detection

Lab-on-a-chip technology helps cancer detection
IBM scientists have developed a lab-on-a-chip technology that can, for the first time, separate biological particles at the nanoscale and could enable physicians to detect diseases such as cancer before symptoms appear. As reported today in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, the IBM team's results show size-based separation of bioparticles down to 20 nm in diameter, a scale that gives access to important particles such as DNA, viruses and exosomes.
2nd August 2016

Biomarkers may predict early Alzheimer's disease

University of Wisconsin-Madison Alzheimer’s researchers have identified a scientific approach that may help predict which older adults are more likely to develop cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease well before the onset of dementia. This approach – which statistically analyses a panel of biomarkers – could help identify people most likely to benefit from drugs or other interventions to slow the progress of the disease. The study was published in the August edition of the journal Brain.
2nd August 2016

Virtual brain aids the investigation of epilepsy

Virtual brain aids the investigation of epilepsy
Researchers at CNRS, INSERM, Aix-Marseille University and AP-HM have just created a virtual brain that can reconstitute the brain of a person affected by epilepsy for the first time. From this work we understand better how the disease works and can also better prepare for surgery. These results are published in Neuroimage. Worldwide, one percent of the population suffers from epilepsy.
29th July 2016


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